weave

1 of 3

verb (1)

wove ˈwōv How to pronounce weave (audio) or weaved; woven ˈwō-vən How to pronounce weave (audio) or weaved; weaving

transitive verb

1
a
: to form (cloth) by interlacing strands (as of yarn)
specifically : to make (cloth) on a loom by interlacing warp and filling threads
b
: to interlace (threads) into cloth
c
: to make (something, such as a basket) by intertwining
2
: spin sense 2
used of spiders and insects
3
: to interlace especially to form a texture, fabric, or design
4
a
: to produce by elaborately combining elements : contrive
b
: to unite in a coherent whole
c
: to introduce as an appropriate element : work in
usually used with in or into
5
: to direct (something, such as the body) in a winding or zigzag course especially to avoid obstacles

intransitive verb

1
: to work at weaving : make cloth
2
: to move in a devious, winding, or zigzag course especially to avoid obstacles

weave

2 of 3

noun

1
: something woven
especially : woven cloth
2
: any of the patterns or methods for interlacing the threads of woven fabrics
3
: a hair extension (see extension sense 7d)
specifically : a length of natural or synthetic hair that is sewn into one's natural hair after it has been braided into cornrows

weave

3 of 3

verb (2)

weaved; weaving

intransitive verb

: to move waveringly from side to side : sway

Examples of weave in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
The practice of exchanging information through IM apps has seamlessly woven itself into the fabric of our daily lives. David Balaban, Forbes, 18 Feb. 2024 Director Anthony Philipson weaves dramatic scenes of Einstein (capably played by a twinkle-eyed Aidan McArdle) with documentary footage; the screenplay uses only words spoken or written by Einstein himself. Chris Vognar, Rolling Stone, 17 Feb. 2024 Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu vowed again Wednesday to attack Rafah, saying that Hamas has woven its remaining brigades, weapons and smuggling routes throughout the city. Miriam Berger, Washington Post, 15 Feb. 2024 The designer has excelled in her objective, creating playful pieces that weave the energy of her Indian Nigerian background into each seam. Alexis Bennett Parker, Vogue, 15 Feb. 2024 Sliding back into her chair, Angi watches as a group of holiday travelers—headphones wrapped around their necks, skis tucked snugly inside tailored bags—weave their way through the room. Seyward Darby, Longreads, 14 Feb. 2024 Instead of having to weave them through slots, there’s a security lock that pops up and closes when the straps are in, which is a convenient feature. Jessica Booth, Parents, 14 Feb. 2024 His work is inspired by a mix of art history, science and personal mythology, woven together in an attempt to understand the mysteries of reality. The San Diego Union-Tribune Staff, San Diego Union-Tribune, 14 Feb. 2024 If this connection to the war wasn’t evident to anyone watching, one only needed to see the myriad veterans in their old military uniforms woven through the ranks of Truthers. Elliot Ackerman, WIRED, 12 Feb. 2024
Noun
Roll the sausage toward you, this time with the bacon weave, until completely wrapped. Tim Engle, Kansas City Star, 24 Jan. 2024 Months have been spent tracking the aspirants' bobs and weaves, this tick up or down in polling, that endorsement or defection. TIME, 14 Jan. 2024 While there are a few snags, the weave of the fabric easily hides them. Kristina McGuirk, Better Homes & Gardens, 29 Oct. 2023 Separate front edge of sausage layer from the bacon weave and roll away from you. Tim Engle, Kansas City Star, 24 Jan. 2024 They’re also equipped with a 210-thread count sateen weave that provides additional silkiness and a luxe-looking sheen to the sheets. Clara McMahon, Peoplemag, 6 Jan. 2024 Ciriaco Sayoc, an artist based in San Francisco, has crafted his own parol style using interlocking wooden pieces inspired by traditional wooden boats and featuring the sunburst rattan weave. Hannah Dormido, Washington Post, 20 Dec. 2023 Additionally, the fabric has a thickness of 22 momme, resulting in a strong, dense weave, which holds up extremely well. Dobrina Zhekova, Travel + Leisure, 13 Nov. 2023 The country holds a special place in Scott's heart and he and his famous twin weave in their culture whenever possible — for Drew Scott’s 2018 wedding, both brothers wore kilts. Angel Saunders, Peoplemag, 23 Aug. 2023
Verb
The second act began to weave The Record together with the group’s debut EP boygenius. Larisha Paul, Rolling Stone, 13 Apr. 2023 The caddy is offered in either brown or gray and is made with a steel frame and resin wicker weave for a stylish touch. Jamie Weissman, Better Homes & Gardens, 11 Apr. 2023 LLMs have an incredible ability to generate unique text, cracking jokes and weaving narratives about imaginary characters. IEEE Spectrum, 10 Apr. 2023 Residents line their irrigation ditches with shells, hang blue bottles from trees to ward off evil spirits and weave intricate baskets with seagrass found along the coast. Sara Novak, Scientific American, 6 Apr. 2023 Remove brittle plastic, then weave on new vinyl strapping. Jeanne Huber, Washington Post, 31 Mar. 2023 The Emiratis signed on, and Alp operatives began weaving webs of associations linking Islamic Relief officials to the Muslim Brotherhood or to violent extremists. David D. Kirkpatrick, The New Yorker, 27 Mar. 2023 John Stocco, not the most nimble of runners, got outstanding blocking and weaved his way through traffic for the game-winning touchdown with 24 seconds left. Jeff Potrykus, Journal Sentinel, 25 Mar. 2023 At a carpet factory in Kabul, women who were former government employees or high school and university students now spend their days weaving carpets. Rahim Faiez, ajc, 9 Mar. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'weave.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb (1)

Middle English weven, from Old English wefan; akin to Old High German weban to weave, Greek hyphainein to weave, hyphos web

Verb (2)

Middle English weven to move to and fro, wave; akin to Old Norse veifa to be in movement — more at wipe

First Known Use

Verb (1)

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1581, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (2)

1596, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of weave was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near weave

Cite this Entry

“Weave.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/weave. Accessed 24 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

weave

1 of 2 verb
wove ˈwōv How to pronounce weave (audio) or weaved; woven ˈwō-vən How to pronounce weave (audio) or weaved; weaving
1
a
: to form by lacing together strands of material
especially : to make on a loom by lacing together threads going lengthwise with threads going crosswise
weave cloth
b
: to form into a fabric
weave wool into tweeds
2
: spin entry 1 sense 2b
a caterpillar weaves a cocoon
3
a
: to make by or as if by lacing together parts
wove an exciting adventure tale
b
: to insert as a part : work in
weave a moral into a tale
4
: to move back and forth or from side to side
weaving his way through a crowd of holiday shoppers

weave

2 of 2 noun
: a pattern or method of weaving

More from Merriam-Webster on weave

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