working

noun
work·​ing | \ ˈwər-kiŋ How to pronounce working (audio) \

Definition of working

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the manner of functioning or operating : operation usually used in pluralthe inner workings of the government
2 : an excavation or group of excavations made in mining, quarrying, or tunneling usually used in plural

working

adjective

Definition of working (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : engaged in work especially for wages or a salary a working journalist a working mother
2 : adequate to permit work to be done a working majority
3 : assumed or adopted to permit or facilitate further work or activity a working draft
4 : spent at work working life
5 : being in use or operation a working farm

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Examples of working in a Sentence

Adjective There is a good working relationship between the departments. the working parts of the machine
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In angling to extract Britain from the European Union by Oct. 31, with or without a deal, Johnson has lost his working majority in Parliament, exiled veteran Conservative lawmakers, and failed twice to secure an early election. BostonGlobe.com, "LONDON — A Scottish court ruled Wednesday that Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s decision to suspend Parliament was unlawful, a remarkable rebuke of the government’s hard-line tactics in trying to pull Britain out of the European Union.," 12 Sep. 2019 Some residents are concerned about noise created by dredging and pile-driving, said Kalmick, who’s been assured the latter will only be conducted during regular working hours. Daniel Langhorne, Daily Pilot, "Navy awards $154 million construction contract to modernize Seal Beach base," 5 Sep. 2019 Using census data, the investment company the Blackstone Group estimates that without immigration, the working-age population between 25 and 64 years old would drop by 17 million by 2035. Patricia Cohen, New York Times, "Economic Antidote for a Shrinking America: Immigrants," 22 Aug. 2019 People ages 65 and older spent an average of $18,424 on medical care in 2010 – five times the spending per child and three times the spending per working-age person, a report from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services says. Marisa Iati, Twin Cities, "Washington State couple dead in apparent murder-suicide left notes saying they couldn’t afford medical care, police say," 11 Aug. 2019 People ages 65 and older spent an average of $18,424 on medical care in 2010 — five times the spending per child and three times the spending per working-age person, a report from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services says. Marisa Iati, Washington Post, "Couple dead in apparent murder-suicide left notes saying they couldn’t afford medical care, police say," 10 Aug. 2019 People ages 65 and older spent an average of $18,424 on medical care in 2010 - five times the spending per child and three times the spending per working-age person, a report from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services says. The Washington Post, oregonlive.com, "Washington couple dead in apparent murder-suicide left notes saying they couldn’t afford medical care, police say," 10 Aug. 2019 The ratio of workers over 65 to the working-age population has been rising since 1998, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Orla Mccaffrey, Dallas News, "Plano is America's second hardest-working city. Here's where other North Texas workaholics live," 30 July 2019 By 2060, the working-age population of Japan, South Korea and Europe is projected to shrink by almost a quarter—by roughly 140 million people—and Germany and Japan will have more people over 70 than under 20, according to United Nations data. George P. Shultz And Pedro Aspe, WSJ, "Make Central America Great Again," 10 July 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective After her children started school, Priscilla Tainter made preliminary forays into the working world, doing office work for her first husband (a semiconductor sales manager) and in a local brokerage firm. Baltimore Sun Staff, baltimoresun.com, "Priscilla M. Tainter-Scherr, former public relations official at Sheppard Pratt, dies," 2 Sep. 2019 Kids are still on summer break and the working world is finally using their vacation time to soak up the late summer rays before fall settles in. Sarah Madaus, Town & Country, "Calling All Travelers: These Are the Official TSA Liquid Rules," 31 July 2019 But does the Democratic base — a diverse coalition of affluent liberals and more working-class voters — see it the same way? Kabir Khanna, CBS News, "Analysis: How financially concerned and comfortable Democrats differ on economy and 2020 candidates," 25 July 2019 Dear college graduate: Welcome to the working world! Lauren Weber And Chip Cutter, WSJ, "A Wake-Up Call for Grads: Entry-Level Jobs Aren’t So Entry Level Any More," 10 May 2019 The Chairo is associated with being poorer or more working class — and darker-skinned. Alejandro Maciel, Los Angeles Times, "For Mexicans in the U.S., the president of their homeland makes for spirited debate and begrudging silence," 14 Sep. 2019 Workers took an unpaid day to protest against working conditions that regularly included 10-hour days and six day work weeks. Merrie Monteagudo, San Diego Union-Tribune, "From the Archives: Labor Day became a national holiday in 1894," 2 Sep. 2019 The group also claimed that O’Neill has failed to adequately address the working conditions of police officers, including quality-of-life issues and mental health support. NBC News, "NYC police union votes 'no confidence' in Mayor Bill de Blasio," 28 Aug. 2019 The matter is complicated by the fact that the working conditions of the men and women are collectively bargained separately. Peter Schmuck, baltimoresun.com, "Schmuck: U.S. Women's World Cup journey has even captured the imagination of this non-soccer fan," 7 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'working.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of working

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1708, in the meaning defined at sense 2

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Statistics for working

Last Updated

6 Nov 2019

Time Traveler for working

The first known use of working was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for working

working

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of working

: having a job
: of or relating to a person's job
: suitable to be worn while working

working

adjective
work·​ing | \ ˈwər-kiŋ How to pronounce working (audio) \

Kids Definition of working

1 : doing work especially for a living working people
2 : relating to work working hours
3 : good enough to allow work or further work to be done a working agreement

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More from Merriam-Webster on working

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for working

Spanish Central: Translation of working

Nglish: Translation of working for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of working for Arabic Speakers

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not being in agreement or harmony

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