wince

verb
\ ˈwin(t)s How to pronounce wince (audio) \
winced; wincing

Definition of wince

intransitive verb

: to shrink back involuntarily (as from pain) : flinch

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Other Words from wince

wince noun

Choose the Right Synonym for wince

recoil, shrink, flinch, wince, blench, quail mean to draw back in fear or distaste. recoil implies a start or movement away through shock, fear, or disgust. recoiled at the suggestion of stealing shrink suggests an instinctive recoil through sensitiveness, scrupulousness, or cowardice. shrank from the unpleasant truth flinch implies a failure to endure pain or face something dangerous or frightening with resolution. faced her accusers without flinching wince suggests a slight involuntary physical reaction (such as a start or recoiling). winced in pain blench implies fainthearted flinching. stood their ground without blenching quail suggests shrinking and cowering in fear. quailed before the apparition

Examples of wince in a Sentence

winced at the movie's graphic depiction of combat injuries
Recent Examples on the Web Some goaltenders wince when the shootout is mentioned. Joe Reedy, Star Tribune, "Comtois, Terry lead Ducks to 2-1 shootout win over Ducks," 7 Feb. 2021 Whenever President Trump tweets something controversial or without merit, many Republican lawmakers seemingly wince, but eventually find a way to move past it. TheWeek, "Marco Rubio's former chief of staff lays out how conservatives get over Trump's worst tweets," 9 June 2020 Different By Design The deal also embraces a level of Socialist-style central planning that would have made past American presidents wince. Justin Sink, Bloomberg.com, "Trump to Sign Trade Deal With China While Leaving Tariffs in Place," 10 May 2020 Who was being absurd: the person going out for a drink in Lower Manhattan on a Saturday night or the reporter standing six feet away, wearing gloves, wincing at every tiny fleck of spit arcing out of his subjects’ mouths? Anastasia Edel, The New York Review of Books, "Pandemic Journal, March 17–22," 22 Mar. 2020 Who was being absurd: the person going out for a drink in Lower Manhattan on a Saturday night or the reporter standing six feet away, wearing gloves, wincing at every tiny fleck of spit arcing out of his subjects’ mouths? Anastasia Edel, The New York Review of Books, "Pandemic Journal," 21 Mar. 2020 The fish winces at the feeling of a 3/0 stinger sinking into its jaw, bursts like a torpedo straight at me, makes a last-second course correction, and sends water exploding into the air, just inches from my feet. Ben Romans, Outdoor Life, "Want to Catch a Muskie on a Fly Rod? Never Give Up," 13 Mar. 2020 Different By Design The deal also embraces a level of Socialist-style central planning that would have made past American presidents wince. Fortune, "Trump prepares to sign ‘beautiful monster’ Phase One trade deal with China," 15 Jan. 2020 The Scot picks up his mic, and everyone in the crowd winces as this loud, chewing sound echoes around the room. SI.com, "90min's Premier League Hall of Fame: Class of 2017," 30 Oct. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'wince.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of wince

circa 1748, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for wince

Middle English wynsen to kick out, start, from Anglo-French *wincer, *guincer to shift direction, dodge, by-form of guenchir, probably of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German wenken, wankōn to totter — more at wench

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Time Traveler for wince

Time Traveler

The first known use of wince was circa 1748

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Statistics for wince

Last Updated

16 Feb 2021

Cite this Entry

“Wince.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/wince. Accessed 1 Mar. 2021.

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More Definitions for wince

wince

verb

English Language Learners Definition of wince

: to have an expression on your face for a very short time which shows that you are embarrassed or in pain

wince

verb
\ ˈwins How to pronounce wince (audio) \
winced; wincing

Kids Definition of wince

: to draw back (as from pain)

More from Merriam-Webster on wince

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for wince

Nglish: Translation of wince for Spanish Speakers

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