weather

1 of 3

noun

weath·​er ˈwe-t͟hər How to pronounce weather (audio)
1
: the state of the atmosphere with respect to heat or cold, wetness or dryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness
2
: state or vicissitude of life or fortune
3
: disagreeable atmospheric conditions: such as
a
: rain, storm
b
: cold air with dampness
4

weather

2 of 3

verb

weathered; weathering
ˈwet͟h-riŋ,
ˈwe-t͟hə- How to pronounce weather (audio)

transitive verb

1
: to expose to the open air : subject to the action of the elements
2
: to bear up against and come safely through
weather a storm
weather a crisis

intransitive verb

: to undergo or endure the action of the elements

weather

3 of 3

adjective

: of or relating to the side facing the wind compare lee
Phrases
to weather
: in the direction from which the wind is blowing
under the weather

Examples of weather in a Sentence

Noun The weather today will be hot and dry. The hikers sought protection from the weather under an overhang. It looks like we're in for some weather tomorrow. We'll take a look at the weather right after this commercial break. Check the weather before you make plans. Verb The wood on the porch has weathered over the years. They weathered a terrible storm while at sea. He has weathered the criticism well. See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
After a weekend of sunshine and clear blue skies, cold weather and rain are set to hit the Bay Area again later this week. Kate Talerico, The Mercury News, 25 Feb. 2024 Orange County and the Inland Empire will see partly cloudy skies and cooler weather with highs in the upper 60s to low 70s across the weekend. Mona Darwish, Orange County Register, 25 Feb. 2024 By maintaining positive cash flow, startups can avoid cash crunches, take advantage of growth opportunities, and weather financial challenges during periods of uncertainty. Abdo Riani, Forbes, 24 Feb. 2024 The latter says this new test was a rude awakening for their real counterparts, fraught with harsh weather, tough living conditions and, as the show will depict, the threat of not knowing what’s happening on the frontlines or back home. Hunter Ingram, Variety, 23 Feb. 2024 McAuley says senior centers are where elders can get information about programs through their local governments, and adds that church youth groups often provide assistance in inclement weather and during the winter season. Carley Thornell, The Enquirer, 23 Feb. 2024 Many cities in south and coastal Orange County have a long history of landslides, particularly during wet weather. Hannah Fry, Los Angeles Times, 14 Feb. 2024 Winter is often a comforting time of year—cozy clothes, roaring fireplaces, simmering soups—but the cold, dry weather can wreak havoc on your skin. Korin Miller, Health, 14 Feb. 2024 These can shift based on humidity, barometric pressure, or other metrics, which are also tracked by weather scientists. Jules Struck, The Christian Science Monitor, 13 Feb. 2024
Verb
Innovation and creativity: Older workers are often more comfortable with certain types of change, having weathered it in the past. Meridith Alexander, Forbes, 23 Feb. 2024 Amid the epidemics the country has weathered through the years, chronic pain has gotten nowhere close to being resolved. Brianna Kamienski, The Arizona Republic, 23 Feb. 2024 Millions of Palestinians in the West Bank live without the same political and civil rights as their Israeli neighbors, while Gaza has weathered years of economic blockade. Ishaan Tharoor, Washington Post, 21 Feb. 2024 The Parker Solar Probe draws so near to the star that researchers have occasionally worried about the spacecraft's health—but so far the probe has weathered whatever the sun has thrown its way. Rebecca Boyle, Scientific American, 20 Feb. 2024 Center lines and crosswalks have weathered away on many city streets. USA TODAY, 20 Feb. 2024 The Smith’s, both natives of New Orleans, have weathered life’s storms hand in hand, demonstrating a love that has only deepened over the years, that is visible even through the screen of a short video on social media. Shelby Stewart, Essence, 15 Feb. 2024 Traveling across time, with super powers to accompany their journeys, the now-adult siblings have been responsible for solving mysteries and weathering global turmoil. Kelly Wynne, Peoplemag, 15 Feb. 2024 These areas around creeks are typically green, shady, and great places to weather a heatwave, but when a big, atmospheric river comes, especially a series of atmospheric rivers where rainfall saturates the ground, can cause these little creeks to swell into raging rivers. Lisa Deaderick, San Diego Union-Tribune, 11 Feb. 2024
Adjective
According to Stephen Clark, this was SpaceX's first non-weather, non-range terminal countdown abort since NROL-108 in December 2020. Eric Berger, Ars Technica, 22 July 2022 And now people with a non-weather background reference it, too. Jennifer Sangalang, USA TODAY, 31 Jan. 2022 These breakfasts are particularly popular in Asia and the Pacific, especially at warm-weather private villa resorts in places like Thailand, Fiji and the Maldives. Lilit Marcus, CNN, 21 June 2021 Current laws allow non-weather water loss claims up to five years after the incident that caused the damage. Ron Hurtibise, sun-sentinel.com, 14 Nov. 2020 Sun Country’s business consists of commercial flights between the United States and warm-weather international vacation destinations, transporting cargo for Amazon, and charter flights. Washington Post, 21 Oct. 2020 That chapter has not stopped the media personality from sharing his non-weather opinions on social media. Neal Justin, Star Tribune, 12 Aug. 2020 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'weather.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English weder, from Old English; akin to Old High German wetar weather, Old Church Slavonic vetrŭ wind

First Known Use

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Adjective

1582, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of weather was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near weather

Cite this Entry

“Weather.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/weather. Accessed 4 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

weather

1 of 3 noun
weath·​er ˈwet͟h-ər How to pronounce weather (audio)
1
: the state of the atmosphere in regard to heat or cold, wetness or dryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness
2
: disagreeable atmospheric conditions
stormy weather

weather

2 of 3 verb
weathered; weathering ˈwet͟h-(ə-)riŋ How to pronounce weather (audio)
1
: to change by exposure to the weather
shingles weathered to a silvery gray
2
: to bear up against and come safely through
weather a storm

weather

3 of 3 adjective

More from Merriam-Webster on weather

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