weather

noun
weath·​er | \ ˈwe-t͟hər How to pronounce weather (audio) \

Definition of weather

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : the state of the atmosphere with respect to heat or cold, wetness or dryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness
2 : state or vicissitude of life or fortune
3 : disagreeable atmospheric conditions: such as
a : rain, storm
b : cold air with dampness
to weather
: in the direction from which the wind is blowing
under the weather

weather

verb
weathered; weathering\ ˈwet͟h-​riŋ How to pronounce weathering (audio) , ˈwe-​t͟hə-​ \

Definition of weather (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to expose to the open air : subject to the action of the elements
2 : to bear up against and come safely through weather a storm weather a crisis

intransitive verb

: to undergo or endure the action of the elements

weather

adjective

Definition of weather (Entry 3 of 3)

: of or relating to the side facing the wind — compare lee

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Synonyms for weather

Synonyms: Verb

ride (out), survive

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Examples of weather in a Sentence

Noun

The weather today will be hot and dry. The hikers sought protection from the weather under an overhang. It looks like we're in for some weather tomorrow. We'll take a look at the weather right after this commercial break. Check the weather before you make plans.

Verb

The wood on the porch has weathered over the years. They weathered a terrible storm while at sea. He has weathered the criticism well.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The weather was perfection—truly the perfect New York spring day! Kate Young, Vogue, "Inside Stylist Kate Young’s Star-Studded Met Gala Prep," 10 May 2019 Libra — Storm With a fixation on creating equilibrium around them, Libras have all too much in common with the X-Men team member Storm, whose ability to control the weather is without limits. Marilyn La Jeunesse, Teen Vogue, "Which Superhero You Are According to Your Zodiac Sign," 26 Apr. 2019 Now that the weather is (hopefully) warming up in your neck of the woods, the concept of exercising outdoors is finally appealing again. Jenny Mccoy, SELF, "This 4-Move Workout Works Your Whole Body—and All You Need Is a Step," 19 Apr. 2019 Among the most striking pieces were the pink and yellow Pop Medusa Chairs made of all-weather polyethylene, with a cast of Versace’s Medusa head adorning their backs. Max Maeckler, Vogue, "The Most Mesmerizing Design Moments of Salone del Mobile," 18 Apr. 2019 As evidenced by Hurricane Michael and Hurricane Florence, 2018 saw its fair share of severe weather, racking in 15 storms and eight hurricanes. Blair Donovan, Country Living, "AccuWeather's 2019 Hurricane Forecast Predicts as Many as 14 Tropical Storms This Year," 17 Apr. 2019 Gardeners have been making the most of the milder weather, planting trees and shrubs, mainly spring flowering Rhododendrons and Camellias. Sara Rodrigues, House Beautiful, "Buckingham Palace Is In Bloom: How The Royals Are Celebrating Spring," 21 Mar. 2019 Tunnels are also immune to inclement weather, and several dozen feet underground sound is undetectable from the surface. Megan Geuss, Ars Technica, "Ars takes a first tour of the length of The Boring Company’s test tunnel," 19 Dec. 2018 Currently, the two ships have a traditional flight deck designed to provide a non-skid, weather-resistant surface for launching and recovering helicopters. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "Japan Clears Way for First Aircraft Carriers in 70 Years," 28 Nov. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

When weathered into soil, this shale is perfect for growing cotton, a cash crop planted at a time... Robert M. Thorson, WSJ, "‘Origins’ Review: The Earth and Us," 9 May 2019 Video: Clément Bürge Mr. Bechar believes that only the biggest crypto companies will be able to weather the volatile industry. Paul Vigna, WSJ, "Bitcoin Is in the Dumps, Spreading Gloom Over Crypto World," 19 Mar. 2019 By taking Dell private, the company was able to weather the downturn in the PC industry and expand into other growing IT sectors including artificial intelligence and Internet of Things devices. Mike Snider, USA TODAY, "Dell set to become a public company with tracking stock buyout," 2 July 2018 This is why Republicans have been able to weather these demographic changes, entirely on the backs of white noncollege voters. Sabrina Tavernise, BostonGlobe.com, "Fewer births than deaths among whites in majority of US states," 20 June 2018 Wealthier families will also struggle but are better able to weather the storm, drawing on savings and sourcing some scarce goods — such as medication — from overseas, Batmanghelidj said. Ramin Mostaghim, latimes.com, "The return of U.S. sanctions is expected to sow misery in Iran. But for those with money, there's a haven: dollars," 29 May 2018 Will Snapchat be able to weather losing the support of Kylie Jenner and Rih? Amanda Arnold, The Cut, "Snapchat’s Offensive Rihanna Ad Cost the App $800 Million," 17 Mar. 2018 Multiple other officials remain in place but are weathering scandals of their own, including Scott Pruitt at the Environmental Protection Agency and Ben Carson at Housing and Urban Development. Brian Bennett, Time, "President Trump's Knack for Winging It Caught Up With Him This Week," 27 Apr. 2018 Much of the country is weathering frigid temperatures this weekend, but Britney Spears is all about spending a day warm on the sand. Ashley Iasimone, Billboard, "Britney Spears Frolics on the Shore in a Bikini in Playful Beach Video," 6 Jan. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'weather.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of weather

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Adjective

1582, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for weather

Noun

Middle English weder, from Old English; akin to Old High German wetar weather, Old Church Slavonic vetrŭ wind

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Statistics for weather

Last Updated

14 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for weather

The first known use of weather was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for weather

weather

noun

English Language Learners Definition of weather

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the state of the air and atmosphere at a particular time and place : the temperature and other outside conditions (such as rain, cloudiness, etc.) at a particular time and place
: bad or stormy weather
: a report or forecast about the weather

weather

verb

English Language Learners Definition of weather (Entry 2 of 2)

: to change in color, condition, etc., because of the effects of the sun, wind, rain, etc., over a long period of time
: to deal with or experience (something dangerous or unpleasant) without being harmed or damaged too much

weather

noun
weath·​er | \ ˈwe-t͟hər How to pronounce weather (audio) \

Kids Definition of weather

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the state of the air and atmosphere in regard to how warm or cold, wet or dry, or clear or stormy it is

weather

verb
weathered; weathering

Kids Definition of weather (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to change (as in color or structure) by the action of the weather
2 : to be able to last or come safely through They weathered a storm.

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Comments on weather

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