vote

verb
\ ˈvōt \
voted; voting

Definition of vote 

(Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to express one's views in response to a poll especially : to exercise a political franchise
2 : to express an opinion consumers … vote with their dollars— Lucia Mouat

transitive verb

1 : to choose, endorse, decide the disposition of, defeat, or authorize by vote he was voted out of office
2a : to adjudge by general agreement : declare
b : to offer as a suggestion : propose I vote we all go home
3a : to cause to vote in a given way
b : to cause to be cast for or against a proposal
4 : to vote in accordance with or in the interest of vote your conscience voted their pocketbooks
vote with one's feet
: to express one's disapproval or dissatisfaction by leaving

vote

noun

Definition of vote (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : a usually formal expression of opinion or will in response to a proposed decision especially : one given as an indication of approval or disapproval of a proposal, motion, or candidate for office
b : the total number of such expressions of opinion made known at a single time (as at an election)
c : an expression of opinion or preference that resembles a vote
2 : the collective opinion or verdict of a body of persons expressed by voting
3 : the right to cast a vote specifically : the right of suffrage : franchise
4a : the act or process of voting brought the question to a vote
b : a method of voting
5 : a formal expression of a wish, will, or choice voted by a meeting
6a : voter
b : a group of voters with some common and identifying characteristics the labor vote

7 chiefly British

a : a proposition to be voted on especially : a legislative money item

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Synonyms & Antonyms for vote

Synonyms: Verb

advance, bounce, offer, pose, proffer, propose, propound, suggest

Synonyms: Noun

ballot, enfranchisement, franchise, suffrage

Antonyms: Noun

disenfranchisement

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Examples of vote in a Sentence

Verb

Citizens will vote today for their new governor. Did you vote in the last election? The committee hasn't yet voted on the matter. Congress voted 121 to 16 to pass the bill. He voted against the proposal. They voted the referendum into law. Senators voted themselves a pay raise despite the budget shortfall. We have to decide what to do about dinner. I vote that we get a pizza.

Noun

They are counting the votes now. There are 20 votes in favor and 12 against. He got 56 percent of the votes. She's campaigning hard to raise money and win votes. People waited in line to cast their votes. I cast my vote for the Republican candidate. The vote was in her favor. She won by a vote of 206 to 57. In 1920, American women won the vote. The candidate won only 10 percent of the vote.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

World condemnation was swift: The U.N. General Assembly voted 104-18 to deplore the Soviet intervention in Afghanistan. Hope Yen, The Seattle Times, "AP FACT CHECK: Trump claims innocence in probe; wall myths," 7 Jan. 2019 Since being voted off the variety show in 2010, the 32-year-old musician has gone on to become a worldwide success. Kayla Keegan, Good Housekeeping, "Why 'America's Got Talent' Violinist Lindsey Stirling Will "Never" Be on 'Champions'," 20 Dec. 2018 Trump was elected by the same people who generally vote Republican. Jennifer Wright, Harper's BAZAAR, "What Will Actually Happen to Trump?," 19 Dec. 2018 But the report also found that the IRA specifically targeted its message to African American voters and encouraged more liberal voters to avoid voting altogether. Kurt Wagner, Recode, "Instagram posts from Russian meddlers played a much bigger role in the 2016 election than we thought," 17 Dec. 2018 Sure enough, the sprinkling of royal fairy dust helped Quinn to being voted British Emerging Talent Womenswear of the year by a panel of 2,000 international editors, buyers, and industry businesspeople. Sarah Mower, Vogue, "Meghan Markle, Kate Moss, Richard Quinn, and More From Inside the 2018 Fashion Awards," 11 Dec. 2018 Fast Company reports that answers will be moderated through users voting up or down responses by accuracy and usefulness. Dami Lee, The Verge, "Amazon Alexa is beta testing crowdsourced answers," 6 Dec. 2018 The House is scheduled to vote on a partial spending bill Thursday, after the Senate passed it late Wednesday night. Ella Nilsen, Vox, "Republicans are trying to figure out what Trump wants to avoid a shutdown.," 20 Dec. 2018 The 2016 election was a wake-up call, with the majority of white women either voting for Trump or not at all. Zoey Grossman; Fashion Editor: Cassie Anderson, Harper's BAZAAR, "Uzo Aduba, Katie Holmes & Ieshia Evans Reenact Iconic Images of Social Change," 20 Nov. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The top three vote-getters would likely become the next school board members. Jackie Fielder, Teen Vogue, "Gabriela López Just Became the Youngest Elected Official in San Francisco," 11 Jan. 2019 And Pelosi's granddaughter was over the moon for the new speaker's votes. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "17 Amazing Moments You Missed from the First Session of 116th Congress and Swearing-In Ceremony," 4 Jan. 2019 But here's the plot twist: With 11% of votes each, the Dunpheys of Modern Family tied with the Simpsons for second-best hypothetical neighbors. Hadley Mendelsohn, House Beautiful, "These Are The Most Desirable Neighbors On TV, According To Zillow," 14 Dec. 2018 For years now, Republicans have been using tools like voter ID laws and gerrymandering to rig the electoral system in their favor by suppressing minority votes and packing minority voters into a handful of districts. Zack Beauchamp, Vox, "The 9 thinkers who made sense of 2018’s chaos," 27 Dec. 2018 Potomac Watch Podcast With legislative supermajorities, liberals in California can raise taxes without GOP votes and in Illinois place a progressive tax on the ballot as unions have long wanted. The Editorial Board, WSJ, "The Blue State Challenge," 24 Dec. 2018 Parliament’s vote is expected to begin around 1:00 p.m. EST. Michelle Ruiz, Vogue, "What Exactly Is Going On With Theresa May Today in the U.K.?," 12 Dec. 2018 The judge's scores and audience votes combined is what ultimately led to their victory. Kayla Keegan, Good Housekeeping, "Sky Brown and J.T. Church Won 'Dancing With the Stars Juniors'," 10 Dec. 2018 In November, Lovato officially broke her social media silence to tell people to go vote. Katherine J. Igoe, Marie Claire, "Demi Lovato Shows Fans How She's Fighting for Recovery With a Jiu-Jistsu Selfie," 5 Dec. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'vote.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of vote

Verb

1552, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for vote

Noun

Middle English (Scots), from Latin votum vow, wish — more at vow

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Statistics for vote

Last Updated

13 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for vote

The first known use of vote was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for vote

vote

noun

English Language Learners Definition of vote

: the official choice that you make in an election, meeting, etc., by casting a ballot, raising your hand, speaking your choice aloud, etc.

: the result of voting

the vote : the legal right to vote

vote

noun
\ ˈvōt \

Kids Definition of vote

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a formal expression of opinion or choice (as by ballot in an election)
2 : the decision reached by voting The vote is in favor of the amendment.
3 : the right to vote In 1920, American women won the vote.
4 : the act or process of voting The question came to a vote.
5 : a group of voters with some common interest or quality the farm vote

vote

verb
voted; voting

Kids Definition of vote (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to express a wish or choice by a vote We voted by raising our hands.
2 : to elect, decide, pass, defeat, grant, or make legal by a vote The group voted down the proposal.
3 : to declare by general agreement She was voted student of the month.
4 : to offer as a suggestion I vote we go home.

vote

noun

Legal Definition of vote 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a usually formal expression of opinion or will in response to a proposed decision especially : one given as an indication of approval or disapproval of a proposal, motion, or candidate for office
b : the total number of such votes made known at a single time got half the vote
2 : the collective opinion or preference of a body of persons expressed by voting
3 : the right to cast a vote specifically : the right of suffrage
4a : the act or process of voting brought the question to a vote
b : a method of voting

vote

verb
voted; voting

Legal Definition of vote (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a : to cast or conduct a vote vote for acquittal
b : to exercise a political franchise encourage people to vote

transitive verb

1 : to choose, endorse, decide the disposition of, defeat, or authorize by vote vote an appropriation
2 : to cast votes on a corporate matter on the basis of voted their shares against the proposed merger

History and Etymology for vote

Noun

Latin votum vow, hope, wish

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More from Merriam-Webster on vote

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with vote

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for vote

Spanish Central: Translation of vote

Nglish: Translation of vote for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of vote for Arabic Speakers

Comments on vote

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