veto

noun
ve·​to | \ ˈvē-(ˌ)tō How to pronounce veto (audio) \
plural vetoes

Definition of veto

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an authoritative prohibition : interdiction
2a : a power of one department or branch of a government to forbid or prohibit finally or provisionally the carrying out of projects attempted by another department especially : a power vested in a chief executive to prevent permanently or temporarily the enactment of measures passed by a legislature
b(1) : the exercise of such authority
(2) : a message communicating the reasons of an executive and especially the president of the U.S. for vetoing a proposed law

veto

verb
vetoed; vetoing

Definition of veto (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to refuse to admit or approve : prohibit also : to refuse assent to (a legislative bill) so as to prevent enactment or cause reconsideration

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Other Words from veto

Verb

vetoer \ ˈvē-​(ˌ)tō-​ər How to pronounce vetoer (audio) \ noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for veto

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of veto in a Sentence

Noun a veto of a bill Are there enough votes in Congress to override the President's veto? The President has the veto over new legislation. The President may choose to exercise his veto. Verb The President vetoed the bill. We wanted to do a cross-country trip, but our parents vetoed it. She vetoed several restaurants before we could agree on one.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In the majority opinion, Roggesack determined Department of Health Services Secretary Andrea Palm should have issued such statew restrictions through a process known as rule making, which gives lawmakers veto power over agency policies. Molly Beck, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Wisconsin Supreme Court strikes down Tony Evers' stay-at-home order that closed businesses, schools to limit spread of coronavirus," 13 May 2020 Under the plan, native communities would be consulted about projects — but would not be given veto power. New York Times, "As Bolsonaro Keeps Amazon Vows, Brazil’s Indigenous Fear ‘Ethnocide’," 19 Apr. 2020 With Russia wielding a veto power on the United Nations Security Council, the institution responsible for addressing threats to international peace and security has been unable to effectively intervene to halt the conflict and protect civilians. Shelley Inglis, The Conversation, "The worst humanitarian crisis of the 21st century: 5 questions on Syria answered," 2 Mar. 2020 But the Security Council has been paralyzed throughout the war to deadly effect because of Moscow's veto power in support of Assad, sinking at least 14 draft resolutions over the years, according to the Associated Press. Conor Finnegan, ABC News, "Despite growing risk of refugee crisis, humanitarian disaster in Syria, UN Security Council, US not taking action," 27 Feb. 2020 The British Museum’s appointment of classicist Mary Beard as a trustee, overriding Downing Street’s veto, is now official. Fortune, "What kids think about working at home alongside their parents," 30 Mar. 2020 In 1988, both houses of Congress overrode President Ronald Reagan’s veto of the Civil Rights Restoration Act. BostonGlobe.com, "This day in history," 22 Mar. 2020 Cooper’s veto of the state’s 2019-2020 fiscal budget has left him open to months of criticism from Republican lawmakers. Nyamekye Daniel, Washington Examiner, "Cooper, Forest win primaries for North Carolina governor," 4 Mar. 2020 The state House on Tuesday voted to override Republican Gov. Phil Scott’s veto of a bill that would increase the minimum wage. USA TODAY, "In vitro cheetahs, Devils Tower, ‘SMART Marina’: News from around our 50 states," 26 Feb. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The president pledged last week to partly veto a bill approved by Congress that excluded some public servants such as teachers and health workers from temporary salary freezes sought by Economy Minister Paulo Guedes. Simone Preissler Iglesias, Bloomberg.com, "Bolsonaro Tries to Keep Veto Promise Without Angering Supporters," 13 May 2020 In Pennsylvania, Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf has tangled with GOP critics, vowing to veto a bill passed by the GOP legislature to ease restrictions, for example. Deirdre Shesgreen, USA TODAY, "'A no-win situation': Swing state governors on political tightrope amid coronavirus, Trump pressure," 23 Apr. 2020 In the first book, Warren tells a compelling story about urging Hillary Clinton to persuade her husband to veto a bankruptcy bill. Harper's Magazine, "Letters," 30 Mar. 2020 In the first book, Warren tells a compelling story about urging Hillary Clinton to persuade her husband to veto a bankruptcy bill. Andrew J. Bacevich, Harper's magazine, "Letters," 2 Mar. 2020 In the waiting period, groups including Black Lives Matter heightened campaigns to convince the Democratic governor to veto the bill. Olivia Krauth, The Courier-Journal, "Gov. Andy Beshear signs bill requiring school resource officers to carry guns," 21 Feb. 2020 Representatives from the Sunrise Movement on climate change and the presidential campaign of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders also urged the council to veto the permit. Dakota Smith, latimes.com, "City deals blow to automation plan at the Port of L.A. The robots could still be coming," 28 June 2019 Keisling was the Secretary of State at the time and had just seen a fellow Democrat, Gov. John Kitzhaber, veto a bill passed by the Legislature that would have instituted vote by mail for statewide elections. oregonlive, "‘A 20-year history of success’: GOP Secretary of State says Oregon shows mail-in voting is secure, effective," 17 Apr. 2020 Beshear's communications staff also did not respond about whether the governor might veto the bill. Deborah Yetter, The Courier-Journal, "Kentucky abortion bill shifts power to attorney general, setting up veto showdown for Beshear," 16 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'veto.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of veto

Noun

1629, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1706, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for veto

Noun

Latin, I forbid, from vetare to forbid

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Statistics for veto

Last Updated

17 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Veto.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/veto. Accessed 26 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for veto

veto

noun
How to pronounce veto (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of veto

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a decision by a person in authority to not allow or approve something (such as a new law)
: the right or power of a person in authority to decide that something (such as a new law) will not be approved

veto

verb

English Language Learners Definition of veto (Entry 2 of 2)

: to reject (a proposed law) officially : to refuse to allow (a bill) to become a law
: to refuse to allow or accept (something, such as a plan or suggestion)

veto

noun
ve·​to | \ ˈvē-tō How to pronounce veto (audio) \
plural vetoes

Kids Definition of veto

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the act of forbidding something by a person in authority
2 : the power of a president, governor, or mayor to prevent something from becoming law

veto

verb
vetoed; vetoing

Kids Definition of veto (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : forbid, prohibit We wanted to stay up, but Dad vetoed the idea.
2 : to prevent from becoming law by use of the power to do so

veto

noun
ve·​to | \ ˈvē-tō How to pronounce veto (audio) \
plural vetoes

Legal Definition of veto

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an authoritative prohibition
2a : a power vested in a chief executive to prevent permanently or temporarily the enactment of measures passed by a legislature
b : the exercise of such authority — see also pocket veto — compare legislative veto
vetoed; vetoing

Legal Definition of veto (Entry 2 of 2)

: to refuse to admit or approve specifically : to refuse assent to (a legislative bill) so as to prevent enactment or cause reconsideration — see also override

History and Etymology for veto

Noun

Latin, I forbid, refuse assent to

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More from Merriam-Webster on veto

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for veto

Spanish Central: Translation of veto

Nglish: Translation of veto for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of veto for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about veto

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