tuition

noun

tu·​ition tə-ˈwi-shən How to pronounce tuition (audio)
tyu̇-
1
: the price of or payment for instruction
2
: the act or profession of teaching : instruction
pursued his studies under private tuition
3
archaic : custody, guardianship
tuitional
tə-ˈwish-nəl How to pronounce tuition (audio)
-ˈwi-shə-nᵊl
tyu̇-
adjective

Examples of tuition in a Sentence

Her uncle agreed to pay part of her tuition. There's going to be a tuition increase next year. Before the company transferred her to Mexico, they offered her private tuition in Spanish.
Recent Examples on the Web Costs exceed the revenue Concordia is bringing in, which is heavily dependent on tuition. Journal Sentinel, 2 Apr. 2024 In 2021, the legislature passed a bill creating a program that would have provided dollar-for-dollar tax credits for those donating nonpublic money for non school tuition. Hannah Pinski, The Courier-Journal, 29 Mar. 2024 Yet despite numerous discussions on how traditional tuition can be more harmful than productive for young learners in the long run, tuition remains a billion-dollar industry in tiny Singapore. Emil Lim, Forbes, 29 Mar. 2024 And that doesn't include the cost of college tuition, now averaging $54,880 a year at private schools and $26,820 at in-state public ones. Becky Batcha and Hiranmayi Srinivasan, Parents, 29 Mar. 2024 Yale University, Tufts University, Boston University (BU), and Wellesley College are among a few private institutions that will top this year’s costs for tuition, housing and other expenses, according to the schools’ websites. Zenebou Sylla, CNN, 27 Mar. 2024 The task force also proposed denying federal loans and grants to students at universities that allow undocumented migrants to pay in-state tuition, a rule that would affect UC and the Cal State systems. Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times, 25 Mar. 2024 Qualifying expenses can include tuition, books and supplies, plus room and board if she’s enrolled at least half time. Liz Weston, San Diego Union-Tribune, 24 Mar. 2024 The school costs $24,000 to attend but tuition ($18,000 in 2024) is covered through the Arizona Department of Education's Empowerment Scholarship Account program and internal school scholarships, according to the school's website. Dina Kaur, The Arizona Republic, 22 Mar. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'tuition.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English tuicioun protection, from Anglo-French, from Latin tuition-, tuitio, from tueri to look at, look after

First Known Use

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3

Time Traveler
The first known use of tuition was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near tuition

Cite this Entry

“Tuition.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tuition. Accessed 20 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

tuition

noun
tu·​ition t(y)u̇-ˈish-ən How to pronounce tuition (audio)
: money paid for instruction (as at a college)

More from Merriam-Webster on tuition

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