torrid

adjective
tor·​rid | \ ˈtȯr-əd How to pronounce torrid (audio) , ˈtär- \

Definition of torrid

1a : parched with heat especially of the sun : hot torrid sands
b : giving off intense heat : scorching
2 : ardent, passionate torrid love letters

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Other Words from torrid

torridity \ tȯ-​ˈri-​də-​tē How to pronounce torrid (audio) \ noun
torridly \ ˈtȯr-​əd-​lē How to pronounce torrid (audio) , ˈtär-​ \ adverb
torridness noun

What Do torrid and Toast Have in Common?

Torrid derives from the Latin verb torrēre, which means "to burn" or "to parch" and is an ancestor of our word toast. Despite the dry implications of this root, it is also an ancestor of "torrent," which can refer to a violent stream of liquid (as in "a torrent of rain"). "Torrid" first appeared in English in the 16th century, and was originally used to describe something burned or scorched by exposure to the sun. The term "torrid zone" later came about to refer to tropical regions of the Earth. By the end of that century the word had taken on the extended meaning that we know today - suggesting fiery passion.

Examples of torrid in a Sentence

The team had a torrid time trying to score. the dry, torrid summers in southern Arizona
Recent Examples on the Web Devin Booker continued his torrid pace this week, averaging 30.7 points on 38 percent 3-point shooting, while Chris Paul put up 18.5 points and 8.3 assists, including some big plays down the stretch in the win over Utah. Jeremy Cluff, The Arizona Republic, "NBA power rankings: Are the Phoenix Suns the best team after win over Utah Jazz?," 12 Apr. 2021 Carraway was on a torrid pace then with 34 points in six games including a hat trick in all of those games. Mike Preston, baltimoresun.com, "Mike Preston: Jake Carraway leaves his own lacrosse legacy at Georgetown | COMMENTARY," 10 Apr. 2021 In addition to the torrid, historic offensive pace of Tatis, working with fielding guru Bobby Dickerson and others completely flipped the script on defensive inconsistency in 2019. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Column: Baseball ’21: San Diego can bury concerns, celebrate surging Padres," 27 Mar. 2021 The Federal Reserve boosted its economic growth projection to 6.5% for this year, a torrid pace not matched for decades. Los Angeles Times, "Essential Politics: A Senate showdown builds as Biden takes a stand on filibusters and taxes," 19 Mar. 2021 Corey Seager hit a solo home run in the first inning to continue his torrid stretch. Los Angeles Times, "Julio Urías and Dodgers run into trouble fast in exhibition loss to Royals," 14 Mar. 2021 The problem is at the other end, where the Rebels rank 179th in defensive efficiency because opponents are shooting a torrid 37.9 percent behind the arc. Mark Zeigler, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Mountain West preview: experience plays big part for Aztecs, competitors," 31 Dec. 2020 Watson had 16 points before the 17:00 mark of the second half as Tulane beat Grambling 77-65, following his torrid display from long range with a pull-up on in traffic on a fast break. G Smith, NOLA.com, "No space required: Tulane guard Gabe Watson a master of tough shots," 21 Dec. 2020 Depicting Wilde and Styles as having some kind of torrid affair is a subtle—or not so subtle—form of shaming. Michelle Ruiz, Vogue, "Can We Please Let Olivia Wilde Live?," 25 Jan. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'torrid.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of torrid

1545, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for torrid

borrowed from French & Latin; French torride, going back to Middle French, borrowed from Latin torridus "dried by exposure to heat, parched, scorched," adjective derivative from the stem of torreō, torrēre "to heat so as to dry, scorch, parch" — more at thirst entry 1

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Last Updated

14 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Torrid.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/torrid. Accessed 20 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for torrid

torrid

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of torrid

: very hot and usually dry
: showing or expressing very strong feelings especially of sexual or romantic desire
British : very difficult, uncomfortable, or unpleasant

torrid

adjective
tor·​rid | \ ˈtȯr-əd How to pronounce torrid (audio) \

Kids Definition of torrid

: very hot and usually dry

More from Merriam-Webster on torrid

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for torrid

Nglish: Translation of torrid for Spanish Speakers

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