throb

verb
\ ˈthräb How to pronounce throb (audio) \
throbbed; throbbing

Definition of throb

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to pulsate or pound with abnormal force or rapidity
2 : to beat or vibrate rhythmically

throb

noun

Definition of throb (Entry 2 of 2)

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Other Words from throb

Verb

throbber noun

Examples of throb in a Sentence

Verb Her finger throbbed with pain. The music throbs with a Caribbean beat. drums throbbing in the distance Noun the throb of the drums The pain has changed to a dull throb.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The air throbs with the noise and vibration of this industrial moonshine operation, which distills nature’s harvest into a cleaner-burning fuel. Washington Post, "Farm-state fury creates pressure for Trump as trade, energy pain collide," 1 Oct. 2019 Here's the thing: All piercings will probably sting, maybe bleed, and then throb for a few hours. Samantha Sasso, refinery29.com, "These Are The Most (& Least) Painful Places To Get A Piercing," 3 July 2019 Their engines throbbing, C-47 transporters dropped group after group of parachutists. Washington Post, "The Latest: Plane fly-over wraps up D-Day ceremony," 6 June 2019 The 26-year-old heart throb has been a busy man since getting passed over for the final rose in the most recent season of the hit ABC show — from being spotted hanging out with Gigi Hadid to apartment hunting in N.Y.C. Hannah Chubb, PEOPLE.com, "How Tyler Cameron Is Using His Bachelorette Fame to Give Fine Dining Experiences to N.Y.C. Children," 21 Aug. 2019 And, when the Saint Martin métro station opened in 1913, Paris throbbed with artistic invention. Edward Carr, 1843, "We apologise for the decay," 29 Aug. 2019 Monterey Road, the main street, throbs with taquerias and carnicerias. Steve Rubenstein, SFChronicle.com, "One thing seems sure in Gilroy, the festival — and the city — will go on," 4 Aug. 2019 In my imagination, cities like Los Angeles are filled with kids who cruise across the evenings with their dashboards glowing and soft bedroom pop throbbing through their speakers. Nathan Heller, The New Yorker, "Was the Automotive Era a Terrible Mistake?," 22 July 2019 By midday Friday in New Orleans, gusty winds grew more intense, blowing debris along the ground and causing the city’s famous live oaks to pulse and throb along its streets and boulevards. Jennifer Calfas, WSJ, "Barry to Test New Orleans’ Levees, Pumps and Gates," 12 July 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In one of the oldest souks stands Bakdash, a shop more than a century old, where booza (Arabic for ice cream) is beaten in buckets with giant wooden mallets, up and down in an inexorable throb. Ligaya Mishan, New York Times, "Celebrating America, Scoop by Frosty Scoop," 2 July 2019 From now on, the days shorten, football intrudes, the dull throb of daily obligation gets in the way. Los Angeles Times, "‘Burning Man in the South Bay’: A crazy beach party aglow with bonfires and tradition," 29 Aug. 2019 The malice with which Queen Marguerite spits out her lines, the throb of anguish in Queen Marie’s voice and the Doctor’s affected sneer all start to feel stale after a while. Margaret Gray, latimes.com, "Review: At City Garage in Santa Monica, a king who won't accept the ultimate exit," 19 June 2019 An aura of dread and violence is summoned by the off-center images, the syncopations of the editing and the relentless hum and throb of Jonny Greenwood’s score. A. O. Scott, New York Times, "Review: Joaquin Phoenix Is a Melancholy Avenger in ‘You Were Never Really Here’," 4 Apr. 2018 Justin Bieber, then a wholesome teen heart-throb, meets Baldwin backstage at the Today show. Sarah Spellings, The Cut, "A Comprehensive Timeline Of Hailey Baldwin and Justin Bieber’s Relationship," 9 July 2018 Set in 1929 and ’30, the show captures the jittery throb of Germany’s fragile, fractious but richly creative Weimar era as its brief existence got crushed in the Great Depression and indignant nationalism congealed into Nazism. Daryl H. Miller, latimes.com, "The world is ending, so come to the 'Cabaret'," 15 June 2018 The trauma sticks to my ribs; sometimes a dull ache, sometimes a sudden pinch, and sometimes a painful throb. Danielle Campoamor, Harper's BAZAAR, "I'm Not a Sexual Assault "Survivor"—I'm a Victim," 21 May 2018 Guitarist Brent Smith, bass player Garrett Ney and drummer Tom Lageveen are angular assassins — clinically precise as their sound throbs, rumbles and resembles an air-raid siren. David Lindquist, Indianapolis Star, "Record Store Day acts set off musical fireworks at Indianapolis shops," 22 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'throb.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of throb

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1578, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for throb

Verb

Middle English throbben

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Statistics for throb

Last Updated

14 Nov 2019

Time Traveler for throb

The first known use of throb was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for throb

throb

verb
How to pronounce throb (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of throb

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to feel a pain that starts and stops quickly and repeatedly
: to beat with a strong, steady rhythm

throb

noun

English Language Learners Definition of throb (Entry 2 of 2)

: a strong, steady beat
: pain that starts and stops quickly and repeatedly

throb

verb
\ ˈthräb How to pronounce throb (audio) \
throbbed; throbbing

Kids Definition of throb

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to feel repeated pangs of pain My head is throbbing.
2 : to beat hard or fast Our hearts throbbed from fright.
3 : to beat or rotate in a normal way The motor throbbed quietly.

throb

noun

Kids Definition of throb (Entry 2 of 2)

2 : pain that comes in repeated pangs
\ ˈthräb How to pronounce throb (audio) \
throbbed; throbbing

Medical Definition of throb

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to pulsate or pound especially with abnormal force or rapidity a finger throbbing from an infected cut

throb

noun

Medical Definition of throb (Entry 2 of 2)

: a single pulse of a pulsating movement or sensation a sudden throb of pain

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More from Merriam-Webster on throb

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for throb

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with throb

Spanish Central: Translation of throb

Nglish: Translation of throb for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of throb for Arabic Speakers

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