supersede

verb
su·​per·​sede | \ ˌsü-pər-ˈsēd How to pronounce supersede (audio) \
superseded; superseding

Definition of supersede

transitive verb

1a : to cause to be set aside
b : to force out of use as inferior
2 : to take the place or position of
3 : to displace in favor of another

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Other Words from supersede

superseder noun

Choose the Right Synonym for supersede

replace, displace, supplant, supersede mean to put out of a usual or proper place or into the place of another. replace implies a filling of a place once occupied by something lost, destroyed, or no longer usable or adequate. replaced the broken window displace implies an ousting or dislodging. war had displaced thousands supplant implies either a dispossessing or usurping of another's place, possessions, or privileges or an uprooting of something and its replacement with something else. was abruptly supplanted in her affections by another supersede implies replacing a person or thing that has become superannuated, obsolete, or otherwise inferior. the new edition supersedes all previous ones

Examples of supersede in a Sentence

Fortunately, the scientific enterprise has its own self-correcting mechanisms that eventually sort things out. Studies that are wrong will be superseded by better studies with different results. Studies that are right will be corroborated by other good studies. — Harriet Hall, Skeptic, 2007 The ancient human carriers of information and understanding—elders, priests, bards, teachers, and community members—are superseded by a more durable and efficient medium, the printed word. — M. Rex Miller, The Millennium Matrix, 2004 Upgrading America's too-old, too-slow telephone network, which took about a century to build, is a massive task. But if you believe predictions that the Internet will one day supersede the telephone as the world's primary means of communications, these companies will be road kill if they simply sit by the wayside. — Bethany McLean, Fortune, 6 Dec. 1999 This edition supersedes the previous one. Former stars were being superseded by younger actors.
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Recent Examples on the Web Linda Morrow, 67, was deported by Israel in July and faces a 2016 superseding indictment in connection with the scheme, as well as new contempt of court charges for fleeing while free on bond, prosecutors said. Dennis Romero, NBC News, "Former doctor extradited from Israel after plastic surgery scam," 24 Jan. 2020 Under the resolution, the city government will not use its resources to prosecute anti-gun laws, even though any state laws limiting gun use would supersede the local government's authority. Brandi Kellam, CBS News, "Virginia Beach passes resolution to make itself a Second Amendment sanctuary," 7 Jan. 2020 The new paperwork was filed as an information, meaning Pearson is expected to plead guilty, and supersedes the previous complaint. Eric D. Lawrence, Detroit Free Press, "Vance Pearson, who led UAW Region 5, expected to plead guilty in corruption probe," 6 Jan. 2020 Decades of tradition should not supersede bold changes to scientific discourse attainable by relatively recent innovations like social media, video conferencing, and other relevant technology. Esther Ngumbi, Wired, "Science Conferences Are Stuck in the Dark Ages," 3 Jan. 2020 Apparently their supposedly superior ancestries, pedigrees, and education should supersede the foreign-policy prerogatives of the president of the United States. Victor Davis Hanson, National Review, "The Impeachment Clock," 19 Nov. 2019 The history of how an English company superseded a great empire in India is really about the corrupting power of government. Iain Murray, National Review, "The Rise of the East India Company Is Not a Cautionary Tale about Corporate Power," 2 Nov. 2019 The new, or superseding, indictment said Luevano prescribed hydrocodone to the two patients outside the usual course of medical practice and not for a legitimate medical purpose. Guillermo Contreras, ExpressNews.com, "South Texas doctor charged with wrongly prescribing drugs that killed two patients," 28 Oct. 2019 Mulder accused Vizcarra of superseding his executive powers by dissolving congress even though lawmakers were carrying out their constitutional right to select judges and voted in favor of his administration soon after. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Peru president dissolves congress amid anti-corruption push," 30 Sep. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'supersede.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of supersede

1654, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for supersede

Middle English (Scots) superceden to defer, from Middle French superceder, from Latin supersedēre to sit on top, refrain from, from super- + sedēre to sit — more at sit

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Time Traveler for supersede

Time Traveler

The first known use of supersede was in 1654

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Statistics for supersede

Last Updated

27 Jan 2020

Cite this Entry

“Supersede.” The Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Inc., https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/superseding. Accessed 28 January 2020.

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More Definitions for supersede

supersede

verb
How to pronounce supersede (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of supersede

: to take the place of (someone or something that is old, no longer useful, etc.) : to replace (someone or something)

supersede

verb
su·​per·​sede | \ ˌsü-pər-ˈsēd How to pronounce supersede (audio) \
superseded; superseding

Kids Definition of supersede

: to take the place or position of These instructions supersede those you received earlier.

supersede

transitive verb
su·​per·​sede | \ ˌsü-pər-ˈsēd How to pronounce supersede (audio) \
superseded; superseding

Legal Definition of supersede

1 : to subject to postponement or suspension especially : to suspend the operation of (a judgment or order) by means of a supersedeas
2 : to take the place of in authority : preempt, override
3 : to take the place of and render null or ineffective

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