intercede

verb
in·​ter·​cede | \ ˌin-tər-ˈsēd How to pronounce intercede (audio) \
interceded; interceding

Definition of intercede

intransitive verb

: to intervene between parties with a view to reconciling differences : mediate

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Other Words from intercede

interceder noun

Choose the Right Synonym for intercede

interpose, interfere, intervene, mediate, intercede mean to come or go between. interpose often implies no more than this. interposed herself between him and the door interfere implies hindering. noise interfered with my concentration intervene may imply an occurring in space or time between two things or a stepping in to stop a conflict. quarreled until the manager intervened mediate implies intervening between hostile factions. mediated between the parties intercede implies acting for an offender in begging mercy or forgiveness. interceded on our behalf

Did You Know?

The Latin cedere means "to go", so "go between" is the most literal meaning of intercede. (The same -cede root can also be seen in such words as precede and secede.) If you've been blamed unfairly for something, a friend may intercede on your behalf with your coach or teacher. More often, it will be the coach or teacher who has to intercede in a student dispute. The intercession of foreign governments has sometimes prevented conflicts from becoming worse than they otherwise would have.

Examples of intercede in a Sentence

Their argument probably would have become violent if I hadn't interceded. When the boss accused her of lying, several other employees interceded on her behalf.
Recent Examples on the Web While the government stopped short Tuesday of asking for specific remedies, the prominence of the Apple arrangement in the lawsuit leaves little doubt that the Justice Department will seek to intercede. Rob Copeland, WSJ, "Google’s Exclusive Search Deals With Apple at Heart of U.S. Lawsuit," 20 Oct. 2020 Mayor Tom Barrett did not intercede when the commission was trying to oust him. Ashley Luthern, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "'I'm not going to back down': Former Milwaukee Police Chief Alfonso Morales talks Barrett, ouster in radio interview," 20 Oct. 2020 Based on their investigation, police believe at least one shot was fired when Nunnally tried to intercede in a confrontation and ran into the street. Steve Sadin, chicagotribune.com, "Suspect in fatal Waukegan party shooting where North Chicago woman was shot turns himself in," 8 Sep. 2020 Some shipping companies and freight customers were already beginning to reroute goods to other ports, and provincial government officials were calling on the federal government to intercede. Paul Page, WSJ, "Today’s Logistics Report: Fighting for a Port; Strife on Docks; Accelerating Technology," 21 Aug. 2020 Doncic and Morris got chest-to-chest and Porzingis tried to intercede. Dallas News, "Mavs knew series vs. Clippers would be a battle. Even in Game 1 loss, Dallas looks ready to fight.," 18 Aug. 2020 That incident started just after midnight Saturday when team of customs agents and Coast Guard members spotted the boat off the San Diego coast, headed north, and launched a small boat to intercede. Teri Figueroa, San Diego Union-Tribune, "In three busts, federal agents seize 530 pounds meth, 940 pounds marijuana," 11 Aug. 2020 Doctors, nurses, social workers, friends and acquaintances are writing to President Clinton and the chief of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, begging them to intercede on Alireza's behalf. oregonlive, "A story in The Oregonian changed his family’s life forever, and set his career choice," 30 June 2020 This will increase the already high rates of foreclosures and cause displacement before floodwaters even hit, unless the city is able to intercede. Willa Glickman, The New York Review of Books, "New York’s Rising Tides: Climate Inequality and Sandy’s Legacy," 19 Mar. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'intercede.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of intercede

1597, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for intercede

Latin intercedere, from inter- + cedere to go

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Time Traveler for intercede

Time Traveler

The first known use of intercede was in 1597

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Statistics for intercede

Last Updated

26 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Intercede.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/intercede. Accessed 27 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for intercede

intercede

verb
How to pronounce intercede (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of intercede

formal : to try to help settle an argument or disagreement between two or more people or groups : to speak to someone in order to defend or help another person

intercede

verb
in·​ter·​cede | \ ˌin-tər-ˈsēd How to pronounce intercede (audio) \
interceded; interceding

Kids Definition of intercede

1 : to try to help settle differences between unfriendly individuals or groups I interceded to stop the argument.
2 : to plead for the needs of someone else Atkins fell upon his knees to beg the captain to intercede with the governor for his life …— Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe

More from Merriam-Webster on intercede

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for intercede

Nglish: Translation of intercede for Spanish Speakers

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