subside

verb
sub·​side | \ səb-ˈsīd How to pronounce subside (audio) \
subsided; subsiding

Definition of subside

intransitive verb

1 : to sink or fall to the bottom : settle
2 : to tend downward : descend especially : to flatten out so as to form a depression
3 : to let oneself settle down : sink subsided into a chair
4 : to become quiet or less as the fever subsides my anger subsided

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Other Words from subside

subsidence \ səb-​ˈsī-​dᵊn(t)s How to pronounce subside (audio) , ˈsəb-​sə-​dən(t)s \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for subside

abate, subside, wane, ebb mean to die down in force or intensity. abate stresses the idea of progressive diminishing. the storm abated subside implies the ceasing of turbulence or agitation. the protests subsided after a few days wane suggests the fading or weakening of something good or impressive. waning enthusiasm ebb suggests the receding of something (such as the tide) that commonly comes and goes. the ebbing of daylight

Examples of subside in a Sentence

The pain will subside in a couple of hours. After his anger had subsided, he was able to look at things rationally. We'll have to wait until the wind subsides. The road will remain closed until the water subsides.
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Recent Examples on the Web In other posts, the smoke seemed to subside, and observers noted that the blaze was apparently under control. Adam Elmahrek, Los Angeles Times, "Westwood fire in Simi Valley grows to 25 acres; no orders to evacuate," 4 Apr. 2021 In essence, effects which resemble flu-like symptoms but tend to subside pretty quickly. Sy Mukherjee, Fortune, "All of the weird side effects you might get from the COVID-19 vaccines," 31 Mar. 2021 This was their norm, and long after the pandemic’s effects subside, flexibility will normalize once again. Chase Garbarino, Forbes, "We Need To Measure Office Metrics In Terms Of Employee Engagement, Not Just Time Spent," 26 Feb. 2021 The 2022 campaigns have barely begun, but with Senate, secretary of state and gubernatorial elections on the ballot in Georgia next cycle, the focus on voting -- much of it coming from potential candidates for those races -- is unlikely to subside. Rick Klein, ABC News, "Trump's role in Jan. 6 siege looms over business of Washington: The Note," 24 Feb. 2021 For days and then weeks, Farshad kept to his routine and eventually the phantom itching in his missing leg began to subside. Elliot Ackerman, Wired, "2034, Part IV: The Spratly Islands Ambush," 16 Feb. 2021 The network’s competitive position has improved in the last two weeks as the number of casual viewers that CNN often attracts in intense news cycles has begun to subside. Author: Stephen Battaglio, Anchorage Daily News, "Fox News cancels Lou Dobbs’ show and is expected to part ways with the pro-Trump host," 6 Feb. 2021 Wind burn, while uncomfortable, is temporary, and the discomfort will slowly start to subside over a few days. Emily Shiffer, SELF, "How to Treat Wind Burn on Your Face After a Cold, Wintery Outdoor Workout," 27 Jan. 2021 On Monday, Newsom abruptly lifted stay-home orders in place in the Bay Area and across much of the state as the post-holiday rise in new coronavirus cases began to subside. Gregory Thomas, SFChronicle.com, "You're still not supposed to travel more than 120 miles from home in the Bay Area," 25 Jan. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'subside.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of subside

1607, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for subside

Latin subsidere, from sub- + sidere to sit down, sink; akin to Latin sedēre to sit — more at sit

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Time Traveler for subside

Time Traveler

The first known use of subside was in 1607

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Statistics for subside

Last Updated

7 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Subside.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/subside. Accessed 10 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for subside

subside

verb

English Language Learners Definition of subside

: to become less strong or intense
: to move down to a lower level

subside

verb
sub·​side | \ səb-ˈsīd How to pronounce subside (audio) \
subsided; subsiding

Kids Definition of subside

1 : to become less strong or intense The pain subsided. The storm is beginning to subside.
2 : to become lower : sink The flood subsided.
sub·​side | \ səb-ˈsīd How to pronounce subside (audio) \
subsided; subsiding

Medical Definition of subside

: to lessen in severity : become diminished the fever subsided

Other Words from subside

subsidence \ səb-​ˈsīd-​ᵊn(t)s How to pronounce subside (audio) , ˈsəb-​səd-​ən(t)s How to pronounce subside (audio) \ noun

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Comments on subside

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