sterling

noun
ster·​ling | \ ˈstər-liŋ How to pronounce sterling (audio) \

Definition of sterling

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : British money
2 : sterling silver or articles of it

sterling

adjective

Definition of sterling (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : of, relating to, or calculated in terms of British sterling
b : payable in sterling
2a of silver : having a fixed standard of purity usually defined legally as represented by an alloy of 925 parts of silver with 75 parts of copper
b : made of sterling silver
3 : conforming to the highest standard sterling character a sterling record of achievement

Other Words from sterling

Adjective

sterlingly adverb
sterlingness noun

Examples of sterling in a Sentence

Noun a drop in the value of sterling Adjective a sterling example of democracy at work credited the win to the pitcher's sterling performance on the mound
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun With safeties and linebackers often flummoxed, an easier way to challenge a sterling tight end, coaches across the country said, can be to focus more on thwarting the quarterback and disrupting that half of the equation. New York Times, 10 Jan. 2022 Rutland was to be paid 6,200 pounds sterling for his first year of service, the equivalent of $465,000 in 2021. Seth Abramovitch, The Hollywood Reporter, 6 Jan. 2022 Like Rodriguez, Bonds and Clemens have sterling baseball resumes that may have been padded by the use of performance-enhancing substances. Dan Schlossberg, Forbes, 3 Jan. 2022 With his sterling reputation as a local athlete, choirboy, Boy Scout and honor student with no prior arrests, Mr. Artis also drew the support of celebrities, journalists, civil liberties figures and others. Sam Roberts, New York Times, 11 Nov. 2021 To this day, Lincoln Hills still maintains a sterling reputation. Morgan Jerkins, Harper's BAZAAR, 17 Aug. 2021 So not long after being sworn in, Huntsman had a meeting with his general counsel, a young attorney with a sterling pedigree named Mike Lee, and the state’s new lobbyist, Bill Simmons, to map out a strategy. Robert Gehrke, The Salt Lake Tribune, 28 Dec. 2021 Originally designed in the 1960s for an Italian industrialist’s private yacht, this sterling silver and bamboo is somewhat exotic, and inspired by Paul Gauguin’s Polynesian artworks. Lana Bortolot, Forbes, 13 Dec. 2021 Reputations in the enthusiast gaming hardware space don't get more sterling. Sam Machkovech, Ars Technica, 13 Dec. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Designed and made in California with the lost wax casting method, this design is also available in sterling silver. Kyle Roderick, Forbes, 21 Dec. 2021 The ensemble cast does a sterling job with the energetic and fast-paced work that contains a few showstopping performances. Simon Thompson, Forbes, 13 Dec. 2021 Against the Giants, Miami held the rushing game to 91 yards, and that (slightly) increased their average run yards allowed the past eight games to a still-sterling 85.3. Steve Svekis, sun-sentinel.com, 5 Dec. 2021 That happened, of course, when coach Bob Stoops was still in the midst of his sterling 18-year run. Nick Moyle, San Antonio Express-News, 2 Dec. 2021 Langer shot under his age for the first time in the third round, a sterling bogey-free 63 with bookend eagles that moved him within six shots of Furyk's 16-under lead. John Marshall, ajc, 14 Nov. 2021 Lynn was a sterling 11-6 with a 2.69 ERA in 28 starts. Larry Fleisher, Forbes, 9 Nov. 2021 Undoubtedly, Lee Scratch Perry will always be remembered for his sterling contribution to the music fraternity. Vanessa Etienne, PEOPLE.com, 30 Aug. 2021 Undoubtedly, Lee Scratch Perry will always be remembered for his sterling contribution to the music fraternity. Daniel Kreps, Rolling Stone, 29 Aug. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'sterling.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of sterling

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for sterling

Noun

Middle English, silver penny, probably from Old English *steorling, from Old English steorra star + -ling entry 1 — more at star

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Time Traveler for sterling

Time Traveler

The first known use of sterling was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near sterling

sterlet

sterling

sterling area

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Statistics for sterling

Last Updated

18 Jan 2022

Cite this Entry

“Sterling.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sterling. Accessed 18 Jan. 2022.

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More Definitions for sterling

sterling

noun

English Language Learners Definition of sterling

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: silver that is 92 percent pure
: British money

sterling

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of sterling (Entry 2 of 2)

: made of silver that is 92 percent pure
: very good : excellent

sterling

noun
ster·​ling | \ ˈstər-liŋ How to pronounce sterling (audio) \

Kids Definition of sterling

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : British money
2 : sterling silver : articles made from sterling silver

sterling

adjective

Kids Definition of sterling (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : of or relating to British sterling
2 : being or made of a specific alloy that is mostly silver with a little copper sterling silver
3 : excellent a sterling example

More from Merriam-Webster on sterling

Nglish: Translation of sterling for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of sterling for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about sterling

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