spook

noun
\ ˈspük How to pronounce spook (audio) \

Definition of spook

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : ghost, specter
2 : an undercover agent : spy

spook

verb
spooked; spooking; spooks

Definition of spook (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

2 : to make frightened or frantic : scare especially : to startle into violent activity (such as stampeding)

intransitive verb

: to become spooked cattle spooking at shadows

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Other Words from spook

Noun

spookish \ ˈspü-​kish How to pronounce spook (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for spook

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of spook in a Sentence

Noun Russia recalled its spooks after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Halloween is the night when spooks and goblins are said to roam abroad. Verb The noise spooked the cat. The little girl was spooked by scary masks.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Add in artifacts and sounds, like hearing a funeral march played on the Reginaphone, and your evening will have some spook. Domenica Bongiovanni, The Indianapolis Star, 14 Oct. 2021 Below, four not-houses of horror: For 25 years, spook enthusiasts have viewed Cincinnati’s Dent Schoolhouse as one of the scariest spots in the country. Matthew Kronsberg, WSJ, 1 Oct. 2021 There’s even a haunted attraction near Sleepy Hollow called Headless Horseman Hayrides and Haunted Houses, which derives its name from the story’s chief spook. Patrick Connolly, orlandosentinel.com, 1 Oct. 2021 And for those truly looking for a spook, stay overnight at the Tarrytown House Estate, believed to have rooms haunted by ghosts. Rachel Chang, Travel + Leisure, 14 Sep. 2021 Wish your friends and family a spook-tacular October with these Halloween wishes! Katarina Avendano, Good Housekeeping, 6 Aug. 2021 Interviewing some former spies, including former Israeli spook Ari Ben-Menashe, whose reliability has been questioned in the past, Epstein’s Shadow takes a cautious dip into the conspiratorial shadows. Jacob Silverman, The New Republic, 23 June 2021 Early-morning light on a field blind can cast a 20-foot shadow and spook birds from a hundred yards. T. Edward Nickens, Field & Stream, 11 Oct. 2017 There’s still time to get your spook on, or snag that perfect pumpkin. oregonlive, 21 Oct. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb China tends to spook the crypto world, giving traders a reason to sell. Kenneth Rapoza, Forbes, 11 Oct. 2021 Inflation has been the boogeyman for Wall Street this year and higher prices are also beginning to spook some consumers. Cnn Business, CNN, 6 Oct. 2021 Each latex figure is 4½ feet tall, foam-filled and precision-painted to spook during even the closest encounters. Matthew Kronsberg, WSJ, 1 Oct. 2021 The writing here proves that Flanagan isn’t just out to shock or spook you but to move you, to spark something deeper inside you than an involuntary scream (kudos to this episode’s cowriter, Dani Parker, as well). David Fear, Rolling Stone, 5 Oct. 2021 On September 18, a group of locals worked together to spook the monkey, which caused the animal to drop the puppy. Kelli Bender, PEOPLE.com, 24 Sep. 2021 Those attacks could spook moderate Democrats and force party leaders to scale back or abandon their efforts. New York Times, 6 Aug. 2021 Anytime a decent herd of caribou came along, a few women and children would spook them down between the fences until they were led to the lake, where the caribou would attempt to swim to freedom. Wyatt Williams, Harper's Magazine, 17 Aug. 2021 DeSantis' executive order appeared to spook some districts, at least temporarily. Will Mcduffie, ABC News, 9 Aug. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'spook.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of spook

Noun

1801, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1883, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for spook

Noun

Dutch; akin to Middle Low German spōk ghost

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Learn More About spook

Dictionary Entries Near spook

spoofer

spook

spookery

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Statistics for spook

Last Updated

19 Oct 2021

Cite this Entry

“Spook.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/spook. Accessed 26 Oct. 2021.

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More Definitions for spook

spook

noun

English Language Learners Definition of spook

 (Entry 1 of 2)

spook

verb

English Language Learners Definition of spook (Entry 2 of 2)

: to scare or frighten (a person or animal)
: to become frightened

spook

verb
\ ˈspük How to pronounce spook (audio) \
spooked; spooking

Kids Definition of spook

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make or become frightened

spook

noun

Kids Definition of spook (Entry 2 of 2)

More from Merriam-Webster on spook

Nglish: Translation of spook for Spanish Speakers

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