sickle

noun
sick·​le | \ ˈsi-kəl How to pronounce sickle (audio) \

Definition of sickle

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : an agricultural implement consisting of a curved metal blade with a short handle fitted on a tang
2 : the cutting mechanism (as of a reaper, combine, or mower) consisting of a bar with a series of cutting elements

sickle

adjective

Definition of sickle (Entry 2 of 3)

: having the form of a sickle blade : having a curve similar to that of a sickle blade the sickle moon

sickle

verb
sickled; sickling\ ˈsi-​k(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce sickle (audio) \

Definition of sickle (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to mow or reap with a sickle
2 : to change (a red blood cell) into a sickle cell

intransitive verb

: to change into a sickle cell the ability of red blood cells to sickle

Illustration of sickle

Illustration of sickle

Noun

sickle 1

In the meaning defined above

Examples of sickle in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun He is often depicted with a sickle, his worship and festivals connected to the harvest. Josh St. Clair, Men's Health, 16 Apr. 2022 One poignant picture shows the bloody silhouette of Russian President Vladimir Putin, a hammer cleaving his head and a sickle plunged into his eye. Phil Mccausland, NBC News, 14 Apr. 2022 Bluebird approached her to help design its sickle-cell trial. Dhruv Khullar, The New Yorker, 22 Mar. 2022 Speaking of the Soviet Union, Russian tanks have been flying hammer-and-sickle flags. Nr Editors, National Review, 17 Mar. 2022 But there was a hammer-and-sickle flag under the golden arches and an international theme inside, featuring a model of London's Big Ben in the dining room. Anneken Tappe, CNN, 13 Mar. 2022 Unlike healthy red blood cells, which a body replaces every 120 days, sickle cells usually die in 10 or 20 days, leaving the body anemic and sometimes necessitating a blood transfusion. Nancy Clanton, ajc, 1 Feb. 2022 These sickle cells die off sooner than healthy red blood cells, causing anemia. Ted W. Love, STAT, 17 July 2021 Healthy red blood cells are round and move through small blood vessels to carry oxygen, whereas sickle cells die earlier and transport less oxygen. Washington Post, 23 Nov. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Montefiore Medical Center is a hospital system in New York that cares for large numbers of patients with sickle-cell disease. Dhruv Khullar, The New Yorker, 22 Mar. 2022 For some patients, a coronavirus infection can aggravate a seemingly unrelated condition—a COVID fever tips an elderly woman with a urinary-tract infection into delirium; a bout of diarrhea dehydrates a man admitted with sickle-cell disease. Dhruv Khullar, The New Yorker, 16 Jan. 2022 Now, Vertex will take over that role for the sickle-cell treatment, on a global basis — a decision made in large part because the company already has a large-scale manufacturing and sales network in place. BostonGlobe.com, 20 Apr. 2021 On Thursday, Nesbitt said the city’s scientific advisory committee decided not to sort this group by age, in part because many patients with HIV and sickle-cell anemia do not live to 50. Washington Post, 18 Feb. 2021 And anything that puts strain on your body can cause a sickle-cell pain crisis. Health.com, 1 July 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The result is hemoglobin S—a misshapen version that causes red blood cells to sickle. Dhruv Khullar, The New Yorker, 22 Mar. 2022 Blood cells filled with fetal hemoglobin do not sickle. Gina Kolata, BostonGlobe.com, 11 Jan. 2020 Blood cells filled with fetal hemoglobin do not sickle. New York Times, 11 Jan. 2020 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'sickle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of sickle

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1688, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1922, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for sickle

Noun

Middle English sikel, from Old English sicol, from Latin secula sickle, from secare to cut — more at saw

Learn More About sickle

Time Traveler for sickle

Time Traveler

The first known use of sickle was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near sickle

sickish

sickle

sickle alfalfa

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for sickle

Last Updated

25 Apr 2022

Cite this Entry

“Sickle.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sickle. Accessed 17 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for sickle

sickle

noun
sick·​le | \ ˈsi-kəl How to pronounce sickle (audio) \

Kids Definition of sickle

: a tool with a sharp curved blade and a short handle used especially to cut grass and grain

sickle

noun
sick·​le | \ ˈsik-əl How to pronounce sickle (audio) \

Medical Definition of sickle

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: a dental scaler with a curved 3-sided point

sickle

adjective

Medical Definition of sickle (Entry 2 of 3)

: of, relating to, or characteristic of sickle cell anemia or sickle-cell trait sickle hemoglobin

sickle

verb
sickled; sickling\ ˈsik-​(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce sickle (audio) \

Medical Definition of sickle (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

: to change (a red blood cell) into a sickle cell

intransitive verb

: to undergo change into a sickle cell the ability of red blood cells to sickle

More from Merriam-Webster on sickle

Nglish: Translation of sickle for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of sickle for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about sickle

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