trickle

verb
trick·​le | \ ˈtri-kəl How to pronounce trickle (audio) \
trickled; trickling\ ˈtri-​k(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce trickling (audio) \

Definition of trickle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a : to issue or fall in drops
b : to flow in a thin gentle stream
2a : to move or go one by one or little by little customers began to trickle in
b : to dissipate slowly his enthusiasm trickled away

trickle

noun

Definition of trickle (Entry 2 of 2)

: a thin, slow, or intermittent stream or movement

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Synonyms for trickle

Synonyms: Verb

distill (also distil), dribble, drip, drop

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Examples of trickle in a Sentence

Verb

Tears trickled down her cheeks. Water was trickling out of the gutter. People trickled into the theater. Donations have been trickling in.

Noun

We heard the trickle of water from the roof. The flow of water slowed to a trickle. Sales have slowed to a trickle in recent weeks. A slow trickle of customers came into the store throughout the day.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Those are the two largest ones, the remaining positions are trickled throughout the departments. Anchorage Daily News, "Full text and video of Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s June 28 news conference announcing more than $400 million in budget vetoes," 13 July 2019 Once his volley winner found the net tape and trickled over to cap the third set — turnabout was fair play, in this instance, after the way the previous set ended — the outcome seemed inevitable. Howard Fendrich, Houston Chronicle, "Novak Djokovic gets by Roberto Bautista Agut to reach sixth Wimbledon final," 12 July 2019 The Pentagon has repeatedly defended its bidding process, though the concerns have trickled into Congress and onto prime-time TV. Washington Post, "Amazon, Microsoft wage war over the Pentagon’s ‘war cloud’," 9 July 2019 The Pentagon has repeatedly defended its bidding process, though the concerns have trickled into Congress and onto prime-time TV. Matt O'brien, The Denver Post, "Amazon, Microsoft wage war over the Pentagon’s “war cloud”," 9 July 2019 While the pipe repair project was budgeted for this year, the pond began losing water rapidly June 19, when water levels in the pond trickled to a few inches within hours. Brian Lisik, cleveland.com, "Nothing fishy -- just a pipe leak -- at Plum Creek’s south pond in Brunswick," 9 July 2019 The owners are hammering the theme that labor peace is good for both sides — that with 10 years of labor peace locked in, the NFL can negotiate for more money in the next round of TV contracts, which will trickle down and enrich the players. Ben Volin, BostonGlobe.com, "NFL offseason often a time for bad news," 6 July 2019 Free agency still works at a fast pace, albeit news now trickles out immediately via social media. The Si Staff, SI.com, "The First NBA Free Agent to Sign Never Expected This Kind of Movement," 5 July 2019 The reports kept trickling in to Austin Pfenninger’s family home in Carmel, a steady stream of good news coming out of a rookie minicamp in progress 300 miles away in Berea, Ohio. Joel A. Erickson, Indianapolis Star, "Carmel's Austin Pfenninger has already bucked the odds in his first year as an NFL agent," 5 July 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Teams and players alike will be waiting for the marquee players to make their decisions, and the trickle-down effect from those moves will take a while to develop. Nick Talbot, ExpressNews.com, "Writers’ Roundtable: How is NBA Free Agency going to play out?," 29 June 2019 Modern humans first left Africa some 200,000 years ago, first as a trickle and then in waves. National Geographic, "Mysterious ancient human found on the ‘roof of the world’," 1 May 2019 The New York Times clearly thinks of its famous election needle, the speedometer-like readout that predicts the results of the midterm elections as vote totals trickle in, as a scientific instrument. Dara Lind, Vox, "America’s love-hate relationship with the New York Times election needle, explained," 6 Nov. 2018 The trickle down effect will reach the Homegrown Game as well, with Liga MX U-20 teams featuring as the opponent to take on MLS's young homegrown talent. Avi Creditor, SI.com, "MLS, Liga MX Join Forces for Campeones Cup, Future All-Star Game," 13 Mar. 2018 There are 2,165 names on the waitlist in Matamoros, while processing has slowed to a trickle: two people one day, a family the day before, nobody at all the two days before that. Washington Post, "Widow, mother of drowning victims returns to El Salvador," 29 June 2019 The Galápagos was annexed by Ecuador from Spain in 1832, which led to a trickle of settlements and penal colonies. National Geographic, "EXPLORE THE WORLD WITH NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC," 7 June 2019 Particularly since the 2008 recession, the generation of tenure-track jobs has slowed to a trickle. Chloe Watlington, The New Republic, "The Labor Movement’s Newest Warriors: Grad Students," 6 June 2019 As is the case so often with trickle-down claims, the reality has been much different. Chris Lu For Cnn Business Perspectives, CNN, "Congress hasn't raised the minimum wage in 3,614 days. It's time to put hard-working Americans first," 16 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'trickle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of trickle

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

1580, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for trickle

Verb

Middle English trikelen, of imitative origin

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Learn More about trickle

Statistics for trickle

Last Updated

18 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for trickle

The first known use of trickle was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for trickle

trickle

verb

English Language Learners Definition of trickle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to flow or fall in drops
: to move or go slowly in small numbers or amounts

trickle

noun

English Language Learners Definition of trickle (Entry 2 of 2)

: a slow, thin flow of water
: a slow movement of people or things in small numbers or amounts

trickle

verb
trick·​le | \ ˈtri-kəl How to pronounce trickle (audio) \
trickled; trickling

Kids Definition of trickle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to run or fall in drops
2 : to flow in a thin slow stream
3 : to move slowly or in small numbers Customers trickled in.

trickle

noun

Kids Definition of trickle (Entry 2 of 2)

: a thin slow stream

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More from Merriam-Webster on trickle

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with trickle

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for trickle

Spanish Central: Translation of trickle

Nglish: Translation of trickle for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of trickle for Arabic Speakers

Comments on trickle

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