trickle

verb
trick·​le | \ ˈtri-kəl How to pronounce trickle (audio) \
trickled; trickling\ ˈtri-​k(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce trickle (audio) \

Definition of trickle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a : to issue or fall in drops
b : to flow in a thin gentle stream
2a : to move or go one by one or little by little customers began to trickle in
b : to dissipate slowly his enthusiasm trickled away

trickle

noun

Definition of trickle (Entry 2 of 2)

: a thin, slow, or intermittent stream or movement

Synonyms for trickle

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of trickle in a Sentence

Verb Tears trickled down her cheeks. Water was trickling out of the gutter. People trickled into the theater. Donations have been trickling in. Noun We heard the trickle of water from the roof. The flow of water slowed to a trickle. Sales have slowed to a trickle in recent weeks. A slow trickle of customers came into the store throughout the day. See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In the hierarchy on board a yacht, the most delicate duties tend to trickle down to the least powerful. Evan Osnos, The New Yorker, 18 July 2022 Around noon, the lunch crowd starts to trickle in -- a group of folks visiting from Texas, two college students from nearby Livingston, and a couple of guys from Tuscaloosa out on their Friday drive. Bob Carlton | Bcarlton@al.com, al, 14 July 2022 The Fenway crowd of 29,783 had already begun to trickle out, confident their team would end up in the win column. Globe Staff, BostonGlobe.com, 19 May 2022 The contracts have begun to trickle down to the high school level after the NCAA’s decision last year to allow college athletes to monetize their stardom. The Salt Lake Tribune, 10 May 2022 The contracts have begun to trickle down to the high school level after the NCAA’s decision last year to allow college athletes to monetize their stardom. Mark Gillispie, The Christian Science Monitor, 9 May 2022 The contracts have begun to trickle down to the high school level after the NCAA’s decision last year to allow college athletes to monetize their stardom. Mark Gillispie, Chicago Tribune, 9 May 2022 That’s inspiring hope that public transit, stores and restaurants will see the trickle-down effects of people physically being in the office. Gwendolyn Wu, San Francisco Chronicle, 16 Mar. 2022 The trickle-down effects of tension at sea can also be felt on the shore, 15 miles east of Mariupol. Washington Post, 25 Dec. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Imports have shrunk to a trickle since the global diesel market tightened. Clifford Krauss, BostonGlobe.com, 13 July 2022 But as the revenue flow turned to a relative trickle, the debt load remained. Milton Ezrati, Forbes, 27 Sep. 2021 But the program was understaffed and underfunded, and admitted a relative trickle of applicants. Los Angeles Times, 18 Apr. 2021 MKM Partners managing director Eric Handler observed in a July 8 note that the Richard Gelfond-run Imax may be uniquely positioned to flourish this year, despite the slate of potential U.S. blockbusters slowing to a trickle. Alex Weprin, The Hollywood Reporter, 21 July 2022 Meanwhile, the recruiting pipeline has dwindled to a trickle. Patrik Jonsson, The Christian Science Monitor, 20 July 2022 This year, a persistent drought has dried the river to a trickle. Rachel Monroe, The New Yorker, 19 July 2022 Imports to the United States have shrunk to a trickle since the global diesel market tightened. New York Times, 13 July 2022 Currently, global health is too reliant on the ‘trickle-down’ approach and products take a long time to reach people in LMICs. Madhukar Pai, Forbes, 25 Jan. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'trickle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of trickle

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

1580, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for trickle

Verb

Middle English trikelen, of imitative origin

Learn More About trickle

Time Traveler for trickle

Time Traveler

The first known use of trickle was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near trickle

trickish

trickle

trickle charge

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Statistics for trickle

Last Updated

13 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Trickle.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/trickle. Accessed 15 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for trickle

trickle

verb
trick·​le | \ ˈtri-kəl How to pronounce trickle (audio) \
trickled; trickling

Kids Definition of trickle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to run or fall in drops
2 : to flow in a thin slow stream
3 : to move slowly or in small numbers Customers trickled in.

trickle

noun

Kids Definition of trickle (Entry 2 of 2)

: a thin slow stream

More from Merriam-Webster on trickle

Nglish: Translation of trickle for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of trickle for Arabic Speakers

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