shout

verb
\ ˈshau̇t How to pronounce shout (audio) \
shouted; shouting; shouts

Definition of shout

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to utter a sudden loud cry
2 : to command attention as if by shouting a quality that shouts from good novels— John Gardner

transitive verb

1 : to utter in a loud voice
2 : to cause to be, come, or stop by or as if by shouting shouted himself hoarse the proponents shouted down the opposition

shout

noun

Definition of shout (Entry 2 of 2)

: a loud cry or call

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from shout

Verb

shouter noun

Synonyms for shout

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

Visit the Thesaurus for More 

Examples of shout in a Sentence

Verb There's no need to shout at me. well-wishers shouted to departing passengers from the dock Noun I gave a sudden shout of surprise when the shower abruptly turned ice-cold.
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Its activists could shout down members of Congress at town halls and scare establishment Republicans with the threat of a primary challenge from the right flank. Gilbert Garcia, ExpressNews.com, "Garcia: Capitol riot culminated 12 years of Tea Party resentment," 7 Jan. 2021 And the next time a quarterback in Ohio Stadium takes a snap and rolls out while looking toward the end zone, the voices of a hundred thousand spectators will shout as one. New York Times, "Was the College Football Season Worth It?," 30 Dec. 2020 Guidance also recommends keeping music low so people can hear each other more easily and don’t have to shout. Chase Difeliciantonio, SFChronicle.com, "Dozens defy county and court dictates, worshipping inside at San Jose’s Calvary Chapel," 13 Dec. 2020 Almost deaf and nearly blind, Harry played opera so loudly that Montiel had to shout in order to be heard. Dallas News, "With SilverStone Hospice, no one dies alone," 23 Dec. 2020 When election officials came out to explain the situation, the crowd would shout over them. Freep.com, "Americans decided their own truth this election season," 2 Dec. 2020 When a policy succeeds, shout it from the rooftops. Doyle Mcmanus Los Angeles Times (tns), Star Tribune, "Joe Biden should read his former boss's new memoir," 19 Nov. 2020 When a policy succeeds, shout it from the rooftops. Doyle Mcmanus Washington Columnist, Los Angeles Times, "Column: Why Joe Biden should read his former boss’ new memoir," 18 Nov. 2020 Also shout [out] to @mindyweiss for putting this all together. Emily Tannenbaum, Glamour, "Kim Kardashian Had a Wild 40th Birthday Party, and the Pics Are Everything," 23 Oct. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Another shout-out to every easily pun-able plant name. Los Angeles Times, "The L.A. Times pays me to make plant memes. Here are my favorites from 2020," 22 Dec. 2020 Trump gave Byrne a shout-out during his post-impeachment acquittal speech at the White House in February. al, "What awaits Bradley Byrne after Congress? He’s mulling ideas," 21 Dec. 2020 Big shout-out to Taylor Swift, who not only dropped two excellent and unexpected albums (including the year's bestseller) but spoke out louder than ever about voting, women's rights and artists' rights. Jon Bream Star Tribune, Star Tribune, "Best music of the worst year: Our music critics' favorite albums and songs of 2020," 17 Dec. 2020 The shout-out over the public address as Dalton led the Cowboys onto the field was nice, but what seemed more than gracious was not one, not two but three turnovers. Kevin Sherrington, Dallas News, "What’s going on with Ezekiel Elliott? Cowboys need to figure out what to do about their star RB," 13 Dec. 2020 The Chicks got wind of the similarities and gave Swift and HAIM a shout-out on their own Twitter account. Abigail Rosenthal, Chron, "Taylor Swift and The Chicks bond over murdering fake terrible husbands," 11 Dec. 2020 Queen Bey giving a clever shout-out to TikTok, singling out each of her butt-cheeks and shouting-out her mom, while her line about jumping to put jeans on earns an instant chef’s kiss from the female population. Billboard Staff, Billboard, "The 100 Best Songs of 2020: Staff List," 8 Dec. 2020 The first Christmas cards date back to Victorian times, dreamed up in 1843 by British civil servant Henry Cole, who wanted a quick yuletide shout-out for friends. Maria Ricapito, Marie Claire, "Season’s (and Other...) Greetings," 7 Dec. 2020 Shout-out: Passing along this shout-out from city officials from Facebook. cleveland, "Time to submit entries for the Avon Lake snowman contest: Short Takes on Avon, Avon Lake and North Ridgeville," 5 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'shout.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of shout

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for shout

Verb

Middle English

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about shout

Time Traveler for shout

Time Traveler

The first known use of shout was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Statistics for shout

Last Updated

15 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Shout.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/shout. Accessed 18 Jan. 2021.

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for shout

shout

verb
How to pronounce shout (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of shout

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to say (something) very loudly
: to make a sudden, loud cry

shout

noun

English Language Learners Definition of shout (Entry 2 of 2)

: a sudden, loud cry
British, informal : a person's turn to buy drinks

shout

verb
\ ˈshau̇t How to pronounce shout (audio) \
shouted; shouting

Kids Definition of shout

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to make a sudden loud cry We shouted with joy.
2 : to say in a loud voice I shouted a warning.

shout

noun

Kids Definition of shout (Entry 2 of 2)

: a sudden loud cry a shout of surprise

Choose the Right Synonym for shout

Verb

shout, shriek, and screech mean to utter a loud cry. shout means any kind of loud cry meant to be heard either far away or above other noise. We shouted to them across the river. shriek means a high-pitched cry that is a sign of strong feeling. The children shrieked with excitement. screech means an extended shriek that is usually without words and very harsh and unpleasant. The cats fought and screeched.

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on shout

What made you want to look up shout? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Words of Snow and Ice Quiz

  • image1037863653
  • Which of the following refers to thin, bending ice, or to the act of running over such ice?
True or False

Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Typeshift

Anagram puzzles meet word search.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!