sequester

verb
se·​ques·​ter | \ si-ˈkwe-stər How to pronounce sequester (audio) \
sequestered; sequestering\ si-​ˈkwe-​st(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce sequestering (audio) \

Definition of sequester

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to set apart : segregate sequester a jury
b : seclude, withdraw widely spaced homes are forbiddingly grand and sequestered— Don Asher
2a : to seize especially by a writ of sequestration
b : to place (property) in custody especially in sequestration
3 : to bind (a metal or metal ion) in the form of a soluble complex or chelate by adding a suitable reagent for the purpose of preventing precipitation in water solution by chemical agents that would normally bring it about, of solubilizing precipitates already formed, or of otherwise suppressing undesired chemical or biological activity sequester calcium and magnesium ions in the softening of hard water also : to bind or absorb (carbon dioxide) as part of a larger chemical process or compound … half of the starting material will be used up and half will be char. That can then be put back on the fields, where it will sequester carbon and help grow the next crop. — Emma Marris

sequester

noun

Definition of sequester (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the imposition of automatic government spending reductions in accordance with sequestration
2 obsolete : separation, isolation

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Synonyms & Antonyms for sequester

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of sequester in a Sentence

Verb The jury was sequestered until a verdict was reached. He was sequestered in his room.
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb For three weeks my family has been sequestered in our home. Kyle Whitmire, al, "Finding meaning in the ruins of coronavirus and Legos," 10 Apr. 2020 So, for the next 14 days, the Kortans were sequestered in a two-bedroom apartment at the Hangout Beach Resort. The unit has air conditioning, WiFi, cable TV, and a kitchen with hot and drinking water. cleveland, "Cleveland TV news couple travels the world as ex-pats in the age of coronavirus," 2 Apr. 2020 Under the new rules, sick passengers would be sequestered indefinitely on board. Freida Frisaro, Anchorage Daily News, "Cruise ships waiting in US waters must stay at sea indefinitely with sick onboard, Coast Guard says," 1 Apr. 2020 Dozens of Consumers Energy employees will be sequestered in campers and hotels for several days starting Wednesday to protect them from contracting coronavirus — and help keep the electricity on. Frank Witsil, Detroit Free Press, "Critical DTE, Consumers Energy workers stay in campers to prevent contracting coronavirus," 31 Mar. 2020 Units that are needed for rapid deployment to hot spots around the globe are being sequestered to keep them from becoming infected. Sarah Brookbank, Cincinnati.com, "Coronavirus in Ohio, Kentucky: Travel ban, schools, testing, numbers, furloughs," 31 Mar. 2020 Families are sequestered in their homes, and people are anxious. Amy Dickinson, oregonlive, "Ask Amy: Life in the time of Covid-19 might reveal some blessings," 30 Mar. 2020 This is the seventh day of our self-sequestering in Florida. Anastasia Edel, The New York Review of Books, "Pandemic Journal, March 17–22," 22 Mar. 2020 The committee and the officers involved in the shooting were sequestered and ordered not to speak to anyone. Farnaz Fassihi, BostonGlobe.com, "Anatomy of a lie: How Iran covered up the downing of an airliner," 26 Jan. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun During the 14-day sequester period directed by Wikoff, sailors are not allowed to leave their rooms, according to the documents. John Ismay, New York Times, "U.S. Sailors’ New Reality: Confinement on Land and at Sea," 22 Apr. 2020 The latest news reports suggest MLB is considering a plan to start spring training as early as May, play all games in Arizona and sequester players, coaches and staff at hotels for 4 ½ months. John Shea, SFChronicle.com, "As MLB mulls drastic options, imagine a Giants game with social distancing," 7 Apr. 2020 Communities with the healthiest intergenerational relationships seem to be at greater risk than those that sequester older people in nursing homes. Adam Gopnik, The New Yorker, "The Coronavirus Crisis Reveals New York at Its Best and Worst," 23 Mar. 2020 And scientists have found that whale poop is a feast for phytoplankton near the ocean surface, which suck multiple forests’-worth of CO2 from the air and sequester it in the deep. Tim Mcdonnell, Quartz, "How much is an ecosystem worth?," 29 Jan. 2020 The trees themselves need seven to ten years to become substantial enough to slow storm surges, shrink waves, and sequester enough carbon in their roots to make a difference. Jessica Wapner, Quartz, "Vietnamese women are hit harder by climate change—but they’re starting to fight back," 1 Dec. 2019 Chefs are exploring how to cook cover crops like peas and buckwheat, which regenerative farmers plant between harvests as a way to improve soil, control weeds and sequester carbon. Kim Severson, New York Times, "What Will We Eat in 2020? Something Toasted, Something Blue," 30 Dec. 2019 In his remarks, Karsner cited the value of mangroves, which not only sequester carbon but also mitigate coastal flooding. Liam Denning | Bloomberg, Washington Post, "Edison Figured Out Climate Action 100 Years Ago," 31 Oct. 2019 These practices have been shown to boost soil health, prevent erosion and sequester carbon in the soil. London Gibson, Indianapolis Star, "Small farms are dying. This plow-free plan could help save them.," 12 Dec. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'sequester.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of sequester

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

1604, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for sequester

Verb

Middle English sequestren, from Anglo-French sequestrer, from Latin sequestrare to hand over to a trustee, from sequester third party to whom disputed property is entrusted, agent, from secus beside, otherwise; akin to Latin sequi to follow

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Time Traveler for sequester

Time Traveler

The first known use of sequester was in the 14th century

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Last Updated

15 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Sequester.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sequester. Accessed 5 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for sequester

sequester

verb
How to pronounce sequester (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of sequester

formal : to keep (a person or group) apart from other people
law : to take (property) until a debt has been paid

sequester

transitive verb
se·​ques·​ter | \ si-ˈkwes-tər How to pronounce sequester (audio) \

Medical Definition of sequester

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to hold (as a metallic ion) in solution especially for the purpose of suppressing undesired chemical or biological activity

sequester

noun

Medical Definition of sequester (Entry 2 of 2)

sequester

transitive verb
se·​ques·​ter | \ si-ˈkwes-tər How to pronounce sequester (audio) \
sequestered; sequestering

Legal Definition of sequester

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to place (as a jury or witness) in seclusion or isolation

Note: Juries are sequestered in order to preserve their impartiality. Witnesses are sequestered so that their testimony is not influenced by the testimony of prior witnesses.

2a : to seize especially by a writ of sequestration
b : to deposit (property) in sequestration

sequester

noun

Legal Definition of sequester (Entry 2 of 2)

History and Etymology for sequester

Transitive verb

Anglo-French sequestrer, from Middle French, from Latin sequestrare to hand over to a trustee, from sequester third party to whom disputed property is entrusted, agent, from secus beside, otherwise

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