sequester

verb
se·​ques·​ter | \ si-ˈkwe-stər How to pronounce sequester (audio) \
sequestered; sequestering\ si-​ˈkwe-​st(ə-​)riŋ How to pronounce sequester (audio) \

Definition of sequester

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to set apart : segregate sequester a jury
b : seclude, withdraw widely spaced homes are forbiddingly grand and sequestered— Don Asher
2a : to seize especially by a writ of sequestration
b : to place (property) in custody especially in sequestration
3 : to bind (a metal or metal ion) in the form of a soluble complex or chelate by adding a suitable reagent for the purpose of preventing precipitation in water solution by chemical agents that would normally bring it about, of solubilizing precipitates already formed, or of otherwise suppressing undesired chemical or biological activity sequester calcium and magnesium ions in the softening of hard water also : to bind or absorb (carbon dioxide) as part of a larger chemical process or compound … half of the starting material will be used up and half will be char. That can then be put back on the fields, where it will sequester carbon and help grow the next crop. — Emma Marris

sequester

noun

Definition of sequester (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : the imposition of automatic government spending reductions in accordance with sequestration
2 obsolete : separation, isolation

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Synonyms & Antonyms for sequester

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of sequester in a Sentence

Verb The jury was sequestered until a verdict was reached. He was sequestered in his room.
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The firm uses satellite photos, forest surveys and computer programs to size up timber, calculate how much carbon the trees can sequester and determine how many offsets their owners can sell. Ryan Dezember, WSJ, "New Carbon Market Pays Southern Pine-Growers Not to Cut," 20 Apr. 2021 Earlier Monday, Judge Peter Cahill rejected a defense request to immediately sequester the jury, the morning after the killing of a Black man during a traffic stop triggered unrest in a suburb just outside Minneapolis. Amy Forliti, Anchorage Daily News, "Expert witness in George Floyd murder trial: ‘No reasonable officer’ would have acted as Derek Chauvin did," 13 Apr. 2021 The element is relatively rare in fresh water, but Wilde says that hydrilla seems to sequester it. Sarah Zhang, The Atlantic, "Humans Accidentally Created a Death Trap for Bald Eagles," 25 Mar. 2021 On Monday, Cahill denied the defense's request to sequester the jury after the killing of Daunte Wright by a police officer in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis. Joseph Simonson, Washington Examiner, "Judge denies request to acquit Derek Chauvin," 14 Apr. 2021 Earlier Monday, Judge Peter Cahill rejected a defense request to immediately sequester the jury, the morning after the killing of a Black man during a traffic stop triggered unrest in a suburb just outside Minneapolis. Amy Forliti, Anchorage Daily News, "Expert witness in George Floyd murder trial: ‘No reasonable officer’ would have acted as Derek Chauvin did," 13 Apr. 2021 The judge refused a defense request to sequester the jury earlier Monday, the morning after a 20-year-old Black man was killed during a traffic stop sparked unrest in Brooklyn Center, a suburb of Minneapolis. NBC News, "George Floyd's brother Philonise testifies in Derek Chauvin's trial," 13 Apr. 2021 Earlier Monday, Judge Peter Cahill rejected a defense request to immediately sequester the jury, the morning after the killing of a Black man during a traffic stop triggered unrest in a suburb just outside Minneapolis. chicagotribune.com, "Derek Chauvin trial: Defense for former cop set to start making its case," 13 Apr. 2021 Earlier Monday, Judge Peter Cahill rejected a defense request to immediately sequester the jury, the morning after the killing of a Black man during a traffic stop triggered unrest in a suburb just outside Minneapolis. Amy Forliti, Star Tribune, "Expert: Chauvin did not take actions of 'reasonable officer'," 12 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The department is also creating a new Climate-Smart Practice Incentive to promote strategies that sequester carbon and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Lisa Schulte Moore, The Conversation, "Climate-friendly farming strategies can improve the land and generate income for farmers," 28 Apr. 2021 Repairing our natural climate—reversing deforestation, for example, or conserving ecosystems to sequester and store carbon—addresses both these crises. Paul Polman, Time, "Our Planet Faces Twin Climate and Nature Crises. Here’s How We Can Tackle Both," 14 Apr. 2021 Her research led her to discover regenerative agriculture and its potential to sequester carbon from the atmosphere. Meimei Fox, Forbes, "How To Make The Ultimate Vegan Charcuterie Board," 8 Apr. 2021 Sarah Bowman and London Gibson report for the Indianapolis Star on the potential to tap into regenerative farming to sequester carbon and otherwise lower greenhouse gas output via agriculture. Mark Olalde, USA TODAY, "Climate Point: Biden takes office with ambitious climate plans but minimal details," 21 Jan. 2021 Agricultural regenerative practices take time to unfold yet are urgent, affordable and scalable to sequester greenhouse gases and contribute to remaining below the 2 degrees Celcius threshold. Frank Van Gansbeke, Forbes, "Sustainability And The Downfall Of Danone CEO Faber (2/2)," 20 Mar. 2021 If students do travel, the school asked those living off campus to self-sequester in their room for 10 days after their return, and take advantage of campus testing facilities. Annie Vainshtein, San Francisco Chronicle, "Will spring break in the Bay Area set off another coronavirus surge?," 18 Mar. 2021 This virtuous cycle is important to us because soil with happy microbes and high levels of organic matter can store more water and sequester more carbon than can poor soil. Erik Kobayashi-solomon, Forbes, "Climate Catalysts: What’s A Planet Worth?," 9 Mar. 2021 Meanwhile, the weekly testing positivity rate in surrounding Prince George’s County rose the week leading up to the sequester order at the University. Lillian Reed, baltimoresun.com, "University of Maryland, College Park’s quarantine, isolation dorms fill with students as officials work to curb COVID-19 spread on campus," 26 Feb. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'sequester.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of sequester

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

1604, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for sequester

Verb

Middle English sequestren, from Anglo-French sequestrer, from Latin sequestrare to hand over to a trustee, from sequester third party to whom disputed property is entrusted, agent, from secus beside, otherwise; akin to Latin sequi to follow

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Time Traveler for sequester

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The first known use of sequester was in the 14th century

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Last Updated

30 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Sequester.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sequester. Accessed 11 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for sequester

sequester

verb

English Language Learners Definition of sequester

formal : to keep (a person or group) apart from other people
law : to take (property) until a debt has been paid

sequester

transitive verb
se·​ques·​ter | \ si-ˈkwes-tər How to pronounce sequester (audio) \

Medical Definition of sequester

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to hold (as a metallic ion) in solution especially for the purpose of suppressing undesired chemical or biological activity

sequester

noun

Medical Definition of sequester (Entry 2 of 2)

sequester

transitive verb
se·​ques·​ter | \ si-ˈkwes-tər How to pronounce sequester (audio) \
sequestered; sequestering

Legal Definition of sequester

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to place (as a jury or witness) in seclusion or isolation

Note: Juries are sequestered in order to preserve their impartiality. Witnesses are sequestered so that their testimony is not influenced by the testimony of prior witnesses.

2a : to seize especially by a writ of sequestration
b : to deposit (property) in sequestration

sequester

noun

Legal Definition of sequester (Entry 2 of 2)

History and Etymology for sequester

Transitive verb

Anglo-French sequestrer, from Middle French, from Latin sequestrare to hand over to a trustee, from sequester third party to whom disputed property is entrusted, agent, from secus beside, otherwise

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