scorn

noun
\ ˈskȯrn How to pronounce scorn (audio) \

Definition of scorn

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : open dislike and disrespect or mockery often mixed with indignation
2 : an expression of contempt or derision
3 : an object of extreme disdain, contempt, or derision : something contemptible

scorn

verb
\ ˈskȯrn How to pronounce scorn (audio) \
scorned; scorning; scorns

Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to treat with scorn : reject or dismiss as contemptible or unworthy scorned local traditions scorned to reply to the charge

intransitive verb

: to show disdain or derision : scoff

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Other Words from scorn

Verb

scorner noun

Choose the Right Synonym for scorn

Verb

despise, contemn, scorn, disdain mean to regard as unworthy of one's notice or consideration. despise may suggest an emotional response ranging from strong dislike to loathing. despises cowards contemn implies a vehement condemnation of a person or thing as low, vile, feeble, or ignominious. contemns the image of women promoted by advertisers scorn implies a ready or indignant contempt. scorns the very thought of retirement disdain implies an arrogant or supercilious aversion to what is regarded as unworthy. disdained popular music

Examples of scorn in a Sentence

Noun Unlike government censorship, this corruption eats at one of China's more beleaguered professions from within its ranks. The trading of favors for cash is so prevalent that, like the honest cop in a corrupt police unit, an ethical journalist risks the scorn of colleagues. — Gady A. Epstein, Forbes, 21 July 2008 He burns with generous indignation at the scorn with which many literary critics have treated Tolkien, and his subtitle, "author of the Century," is meant to provoke. But provocation is only one of his purposes. — Richard Jenkyns, New Republic, 28 Jan. 2002 Claiming their inalienable rights as teenagers, the two exercise an unmitigated scorn for all adults in the immediate vicinity … — B. Ruby Rich, Nation, 3 & 10 Sept. 2001 They treated his suggestion with scorn. an expression full of scorn Her political rivals have poured scorn on her ideas for improving the tax system. Verb My parents scorned packaged and ready-made foods. It did not matter that, at the time, our hometown was a test-market capital for these sorts of food products; my father still thought that convenience food was a Communist plot, and my mother insisted that only trashy people failed to practice a separation of food groups. — Molly O'Neill, Vogue, January 2007 A union member and activist since age 15, bound for an academic career at Cornell and NYU, Fitch, now past 65, writes like a lover scorned. — Rob Long, National Review, 13 Feb. 2006 Stung by attacks on his new Excursion—a 12.5-m.p.g. guzzler dubbed "Ford Valdez" by critics—he has expressed fears that auto companies could be scorned like tobacco companies if they don't clean up their act. Similarly, GM has sought to position itself as the greenest car company, beginning in 1996 when it launched the nation's first modern, mass-produced electric car, the EV-1. — Margot Roosevelt, Time, 14 Aug. 2000 He scorns anyone who earns less money than he does. Her actions were scorned by many people. They were scorned as fanatics.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Another possibility is that norms of social scorn will weaken, and confusion will reign for a while. Tyler Cowen Bloomberg Opinion (tns), Star Tribune, "Vaccines may have social side effects," 16 Nov. 2020 Another possibility is that norms of social scorn will weaken, and confusion will reign for a while. Arkansas Online, "Vaccine creates new issues," 14 Nov. 2020 Florida has about 425,000 state employees, so it’s not every day that an entry-level, $40,000-a-year hire draws statewide media attention and scorn. John Haughey, Washington Examiner, "Blogger’s hiring as Florida coronavirus data analyst draws rebuke," 13 Nov. 2020 Arizona — for all the scorn heaped upon it by, ahem, car-despising coastal elites in professions like journalism — is actually a magnet for housing innovation. Conor Dougherty, New York Times, "The Capital of Sprawl Gets a Radically Car-Free Neighborhood," 31 Oct. 2020 Instead of answering the second and third questions verbally, Troy has drawn a self-portrait with one eyebrow raised, his lips pursed in scorn. Curtis Sittenfeld, The New Yorker, "A for Alone," 26 Oct. 2020 This playoff free-for-all will forever be looked upon with scorn by Giants fans — and with a wry, knowing smile by the 49er Faithful. Michael Lerseth, SFChronicle.com, "Most memorable 49er games of the decades," 16 Oct. 2020 Nor is that scorn confined to the national administration and its response to the crisis. Washington Post, "As Trump blundered, Cuomo stepped into the coronavirus spotlight," 16 Oct. 2020 The public’s scorn has taken a toll on the stock and prompted longtime CEO John Stumpf to resign. Hannah Levitt, Bloomberg.com, "Buffett Inches Toward Wells Fargo Exit as Scharf Sets Course," 16 Oct. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The patient folks who undertake granular debates with those Trumpists who scorn science and who believe fiction over fact. Andrew Cohen, The New Republic, "What Do We Do About All These Trump Supporters?," 3 Nov. 2020 In today’s America, there is scorn for authority and skepticism for tradition. Tod Worner, National Review, "A Dangerous Imbalance: Restoring Order to a Republic in Crisis," 25 Oct. 2020 Ballot harvesting by California Democrats — the legal process of third parties collecting and delivering ballots for others — had drawn suspicion and scorn from Republicans. Michael Smolens Columnist, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Column: Loss of safeguard for poll monitoring further heightens election anxiety," 16 Oct. 2020 That moment transformed Graham's political arc, drawing praise from Trump, plaudits from conservatives and scorn from liberals now donating in droves to stop his reelection bid. Meg Kinnard, Star Tribune, "Sen. Graham's challenge: Fill a court seat and save his own," 20 Sep. 2020 Images of packed beaches, lakes and bars have made the rounds on traditional and social media for much of the summer, drawing scorn from those concerned about the COVID-19 outbreak. Jessica Flores, USA TODAY, "Coronavirus live updates: US nears 6M confirmed cases; US Open without fans starts Monday; India reports 78K new infections in 24 hours," 31 Aug. 2020 Trump's comments about the court vacancy have invited scorn. David Jackson, USA TODAY, "'Honor her wish': Trump jeered as he pays his respects to Ruth Bader Ginsburg at Supreme Court," 24 Sep. 2020 Yet as tornado deaths shift to the Southeast, some scientists scorn efforts to understand the reasons for their redistribution. Thomas Frank, Scientific American, "Migrating Tornadoes Bring Heightened Danger to the Southeast," 24 Sep. 2020 That has drawn scorn from federal officials, who have aggressively pursued charges in federal court. The Oregonian/oregonlive, oregonlive, "Federal, local police respond to overnight Portland protest Friday, 1st demonstration in days," 19 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scorn.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of scorn

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for scorn

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French escharne, escar, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German scern jest

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Time Traveler for scorn

Time Traveler

The first known use of scorn was in the 13th century

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Statistics for scorn

Last Updated

19 Nov 2020

Cite this Entry

“Scorn.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scorn. Accessed 28 Nov. 2020.

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More Definitions for scorn

scorn

noun
How to pronounce scorn (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of scorn

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a feeling that someone or something is not worthy of any respect or approval
: harsh criticism that shows a lack of respect or approval for someone or something

scorn

verb
How to pronounce scorn (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

: to show that you think (someone or something) is not worthy of respect or approval : to feel or express scorn for (someone or something)
formal : to refuse or reject (someone or something that you do not think is worthy of respect or approval)

scorn

noun
\ ˈskȯrn How to pronounce scorn (audio) \

Kids Definition of scorn

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a strong feeling of disgust and anger I have nothing but scorn for cheaters.
2 : an expression of disgust and anger They poured scorn on the idea.

scorn

verb
scorned; scorning

Kids Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

: to show disgust and anger for

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Comments on scorn

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