scorn

noun
\ ˈskȯrn How to pronounce scorn (audio) \

Definition of scorn

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : open dislike and disrespect or mockery often mixed with indignation
2 : an expression of contempt or derision
3 : an object of extreme disdain, contempt, or derision : something contemptible

scorn

verb
\ ˈskȯrn How to pronounce scorn (audio) \
scorned; scorning; scorns

Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to treat with scorn : reject or dismiss as contemptible or unworthy scorned local traditions scorned to reply to the charge

intransitive verb

: to show disdain or derision : scoff

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Other Words from scorn

Verb

scorner noun

Choose the Right Synonym for scorn

Verb

despise, contemn, scorn, disdain mean to regard as unworthy of one's notice or consideration. despise may suggest an emotional response ranging from strong dislike to loathing. despises cowards contemn implies a vehement condemnation of a person or thing as low, vile, feeble, or ignominious. contemns the image of women promoted by advertisers scorn implies a ready or indignant contempt. scorns the very thought of retirement disdain implies an arrogant or supercilious aversion to what is regarded as unworthy. disdained popular music

Examples of scorn in a Sentence

Noun Unlike government censorship, this corruption eats at one of China's more beleaguered professions from within its ranks. The trading of favors for cash is so prevalent that, like the honest cop in a corrupt police unit, an ethical journalist risks the scorn of colleagues. — Gady A. Epstein, Forbes, 21 July 2008 He burns with generous indignation at the scorn with which many literary critics have treated Tolkien, and his subtitle, "author of the Century," is meant to provoke. But provocation is only one of his purposes. — Richard Jenkyns, New Republic, 28 Jan. 2002 Claiming their inalienable rights as teenagers, the two exercise an unmitigated scorn for all adults in the immediate vicinity … — B. Ruby Rich, Nation, 3 & 10 Sept. 2001 They treated his suggestion with scorn. an expression full of scorn Her political rivals have poured scorn on her ideas for improving the tax system. Verb My parents scorned packaged and ready-made foods. It did not matter that, at the time, our hometown was a test-market capital for these sorts of food products; my father still thought that convenience food was a Communist plot, and my mother insisted that only trashy people failed to practice a separation of food groups. — Molly O'Neill, Vogue, January 2007 A union member and activist since age 15, bound for an academic career at Cornell and NYU, Fitch, now past 65, writes like a lover scorned. — Rob Long, National Review, 13 Feb. 2006 Stung by attacks on his new Excursion—a 12.5-m.p.g. guzzler dubbed "Ford Valdez" by critics—he has expressed fears that auto companies could be scorned like tobacco companies if they don't clean up their act. Similarly, GM has sought to position itself as the greenest car company, beginning in 1996 when it launched the nation's first modern, mass-produced electric car, the EV-1. — Margot Roosevelt, Time, 14 Aug. 2000 He scorns anyone who earns less money than he does. Her actions were scorned by many people. They were scorned as fanatics.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Because of the pandemic, everything will be, if not exactly spartan, scaled down and simplified—by chance, a good match for the man, whose scorn for fuss was doubtless heightened by having to sit through so much of it over the years. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker, "Prince Philip’s Death and the Last Embers of British Stoicism," 9 Apr. 2021 Few provisions of the relief package drew as much scorn from Republicans than two transportation projects in the bill – one each from the home states of the Democratic leaders in both chambers. USA Today, "No $15 minimum wage, stimulus checks for people making over $80k: What was left out of Joe Biden's COVID-19 relief bill," 11 Mar. 2021 Reports of the trip from Houston to Cancun on United Airlines went viral Thursday, earning Cruz nonstop scorn from Democratic lawmakers and other critics, including United flight attendants stuck without power in Houston. Josh Rivera, USA TODAY, "United Airlines is investigating Ted Cruz's flight information 'leak'," 22 Feb. 2021 Romney has been the subject of much scorn from Republicans for voting against the majority of his party at the end of the trial. Bryan Schott, The Salt Lake Tribune, "Lee says Romney shouldn’t be punished for impeachment vote," 19 Feb. 2021 Republicans in Congress overwhelmingly oppose the relief bill, casting it as bloated and budget-busting, with some heaping particular scorn on a measure to send $350 billion in assistance to states and cities. Matt Delong, Star Tribune, "TALKERS021521," 15 Feb. 2021 But the proposal brought immediate scorn from conservatives. Rob Crilly, Washington Examiner, "Republicans scoff at Biden plan to create conservative outreach post," 9 Dec. 2020 The Left and the Trump Right speak of the Koch family with equal scorn. Jay Nordlinger, National Review, "The COVID toll, &c.," 24 Feb. 2021 The prime minister has not brought appropriate attire (brown shoes, aforementioned huge socks, waxed jacket, head hanky), and is treated with scorn for it. Carolyn Wells, Longreads, "The Joy of a Pointless Walk," 7 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The militarized look of the Capitol drew scorn from several lawmakers, including Arizona Rep. Andy Biggs, who said the fencing prevented visitors from entering the grounds. Jake Dima, Washington Examiner, "Some Capitol razor wire fencing removed after months of tight security," 21 Mar. 2021 Some tribes worked with Enbridge on the route, while others like Winona LaDuke of the White Earth Band of Ojibwe have nothing but scorn for Enbridge. Bill Weir, CNN, "As spring thaws the Minnesota ice, a new pipeline battle fires up," 13 Mar. 2021 Those intuitions usually commended a staid deism and scorn for those whose beliefs extended any further. Jeffrey Collins, WSJ, "‘The Enlightenment’ Review: Daring to Feel," 12 Mar. 2021 The beaches in the hotel zone looked nothing like the packed south Florida beaches that have drawn scorn from Miami Beach Mayor Dan Gelber though rough waves and high winds may have played a role. USA Today, "'We got bored and wanted to go on a trip': Tales from a pandemic spring break in Cancun, Mexico," 21 Mar. 2021 There are parts of the world calling out for this vaccine, and if the European Union continues to pour scorn on ... Allie Yang, ABC News, "European countries pause AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine rollout," 16 Mar. 2021 Critical race theory has earned scorn from some sectors, with conservative website Legal Insurrection creating a tool for parents and students to track the theory's use at more than 200 colleges and universities. Carly Roman, Washington Examiner, "'Hateful, divisive, manipulative fraud': Chinese American organization denounces critical race theory," 24 Feb. 2021 Greene's comments drew public scorn from fellow members of Congress, who denounced her actions as transphobic. Marlene Lenthang, ABC News, "Rep. Marie Newman displays transgender pride flag after Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene insults daughter with transphobic comments," 25 Feb. 2021 At the end of this road lies theocracy, which could only be achieved at the point of the sword, or withdrawal into faith communities whose existence is protected by the polity their members scorn. William A. Galston, WSJ, "A Start at Bridging the Partisan Gulf," 29 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scorn.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of scorn

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for scorn

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French escharne, escar, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German scern jest

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Time Traveler for scorn

Time Traveler

The first known use of scorn was in the 13th century

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Statistics for scorn

Last Updated

18 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Scorn.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scorn. Accessed 21 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for scorn

scorn

noun

English Language Learners Definition of scorn

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a feeling that someone or something is not worthy of any respect or approval
: harsh criticism that shows a lack of respect or approval for someone or something

scorn

verb

English Language Learners Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

: to show that you think (someone or something) is not worthy of respect or approval : to feel or express scorn for (someone or something)
formal : to refuse or reject (someone or something that you do not think is worthy of respect or approval)

scorn

noun
\ ˈskȯrn How to pronounce scorn (audio) \

Kids Definition of scorn

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a strong feeling of disgust and anger I have nothing but scorn for cheaters.
2 : an expression of disgust and anger They poured scorn on the idea.

scorn

verb
scorned; scorning

Kids Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

: to show disgust and anger for

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More from Merriam-Webster on scorn

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for scorn

Nglish: Translation of scorn for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of scorn for Arabic Speakers

Comments on scorn

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