scorn

noun
\ ˈskȯrn \

Definition of scorn 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : open dislike and disrespect or derision often mixed with indignation

2 : an expression of contempt or derision

3 : an object of extreme disdain, contempt, or derision : something contemptible

scorn

verb
\ ˈskȯrn \
scorned; scorning; scorns

Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to treat with scorn : reject or dismiss as contemptible or unworthy scorned local traditions scorned to reply to the charge

intransitive verb

: to show disdain or derision : scoff

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Other words from scorn

Verb

scorner noun

Choose the Right Synonym for scorn

Verb

despise, contemn, scorn, disdain mean to regard as unworthy of one's notice or consideration. despise may suggest an emotional response ranging from strong dislike to loathing. despises cowards contemn implies a vehement condemnation of a person or thing as low, vile, feeble, or ignominious. contemns the image of women promoted by advertisers scorn implies a ready or indignant contempt. scorns the very thought of retirement disdain implies an arrogant or supercilious aversion to what is regarded as unworthy. disdained popular music

Examples of scorn in a Sentence

Noun

Unlike government censorship, this corruption eats at one of China's more beleaguered professions from within its ranks. The trading of favors for cash is so prevalent that, like the honest cop in a corrupt police unit, an ethical journalist risks the scorn of colleagues. —Gady A. Epstein, Forbes, 21 July 2008 He burns with generous indignation at the scorn with which many literary critics have treated Tolkien, and his subtitle, "author of the Century," is meant to provoke. But provocation is only one of his purposes. —Richard Jenkyns, New Republic, 28 Jan. 2002 Claiming their inalienable rights as teenagers, the two exercise an unmitigated scorn for all adults in the immediate vicinity … —B. Ruby Rich, Nation, 3 & 10 Sept. 2001 They treated his suggestion with scorn. an expression full of scorn Her political rivals have poured scorn on her ideas for improving the tax system.

Verb

My parents scorned packaged and ready-made foods. It did not matter that, at the time, our hometown was a test-market capital for these sorts of food products; my father still thought that convenience food was a Communist plot, and my mother insisted that only trashy people failed to practice a separation of food groups. —Molly O'Neill, Vogue, January 2007 A union member and activist since age 15, bound for an academic career at Cornell and NYU, Fitch, now past 65, writes like a lover scorned. —Rob Long, National Review, 13 Feb. 2006 Stung by attacks on his new Excursion—a 12.5-m.p.g. guzzler dubbed "Ford Valdez" by critics—he has expressed fears that auto companies could be scorned like tobacco companies if they don't clean up their act. Similarly, GM has sought to position itself as the greenest car company, beginning in 1996 when it launched the nation's first modern, mass-produced electric car, the EV-1. —Margot Roosevelt, Time, 14 Aug. 2000 He scorns anyone who earns less money than he does. Her actions were scorned by many people. They were scorned as fanatics.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Suddenly television cameras trained their eyes on deteriorating conditions, and soon politicians, including Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, swooped in, with scorn for city officials’ promises of assistance to tenants. New York Times, "After Years of Disinvestment, City Public Housing Is Poised to Get U.S. Oversight," 1 June 2018 But Dershowitz, according to the man himself, has become the subject of scorn in other circles, despite having voted for Clinton and twice for Barack Obama. Kristine Phillips, Washington Post, "Alan Dershowitz says ‘friends on Martha’s Vineyard’ are shunning him for defending Trump," 3 July 2018 The democracy movement has drawn the predictable scorn of right-wing outlets, which have cheered on his grossest violations. Jonathan Chait, Daily Intelligencer, "Why Trump’s Assault on Democracy Doesn’t Bother the Illiberal Left," 16 May 2018 Yet as the sisters step out into their community, their scorn is thrown right back in their faces. Thomas Harlander, Los Angeles Magazine, "Boyle Heights-Set Dramedy Vida Is Exactly the Show L.A. Needs Right Now," 7 May 2018 In recent weeks, China’s data have invited further scorn. The Economist, "China’s statistics are bad. Many criticisms of them are worse," 7 July 2018 And despite steps forward, social scorn is still a powerful force that could put the entire process at risk. Kristen Chick, The Christian Science Monitor, "Kosovo's attempt to help wartime rape survivors reopens old wounds," 10 May 2018 His bill drew bipartisan scorn and quickly died in committee. Washington Post, "The giant company that could: How Dominion turned scorn into a big payday," 9 Mar. 2018 Many programs lose their way, produce huge cost overruns, face Congressional scorn and generate inevitable comparisons to teacher salaries. Joe Pappalardo, Popular Mechanics, "Why You Should Care About America's Next Bomber," 27 Oct. 2015

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

If anything, Gomez’s reputation is less a discernible track record of being the woman scorned and more as the heartbreaker herself. Michelle Ruiz, Vogue, "You Really Don’t Need to Worry About Selena Gomez," 11 July 2018 One of the most notable cases happened in 2015 when Minnesota dentist Walter Palmer was internationally scorned for killing the beloved Cecil the lion near a national park in Zimbabwe. Lisa Gutierrez, kansascity, "Hunter defends killing 'rare' black giraffe, says it was too old to breed," 2 July 2018 Donald Trump may scorn liberal norms, but America’s checks and balances are strong, and will outlast him. The Economist, "After decades of triumph, democracy is losing ground," 14 June 2018 But why people in Anchorage prefer some lakes and scorn others may be down to preference and perception rather than pollution, Urbanus said. Michelle Theriault Boots, Anchorage Daily News, "Feel like a swim? Here’s the lowdown on Anchorage lakes," 4 July 2018 The Tampa Bay Times, a regional paper in Florida, is cutting up to 50 jobs because of the soaring paper costs, which affect every newspaper that publishes in America, including large national publications scorned by Trump. Jackie Spinner, chicagotribune.com, "Trump's trade war threatens the U.S. newspaper industry: 'This is insane'," 25 June 2018 Italy, where an earlier version of the new governing coalition seemed to scorn the euro zone’s spending rules, will not have reassured them. The Economist, "France and Germany finally have a common position on euro-zone reform," 21 June 2018 Acupuncture was once a fringe treatment in the United States, scorned by the medical establishment as well as by mainstream patients. Beth Teitell, BostonGlobe.com, "Physical therapists vs. Acupuncturists: Who’s sticking it to whom?," 9 June 2018 But now their homes are subjects of neighborhood scorn, even though both say their facilities buck the trend of the unsavory sober-living operator. Lily Altavena, azcentral, "Waiting for state sober living home rules, cities add their own restrictions," 7 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scorn.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of scorn

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for scorn

Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French escharne, escar, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German scern jest

Verb

see scorn entry 1

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Learn More about scorn

Dictionary Entries near scorn

scoriform

scorify

scorious

scorn

scornful

scorodite

Scorpaena

Phrases Related to scorn

pour scorn on

Statistics for scorn

Last Updated

30 Aug 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for scorn

The first known use of scorn was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for scorn

scorn

noun

English Language Learners Definition of scorn

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a feeling that someone or something is not worthy of any respect or approval

: harsh criticism that shows a lack of respect or approval for someone or something

scorn

verb

English Language Learners Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

: to show that you think (someone or something) is not worthy of respect or approval : to feel or express scorn for (someone or something)

: to refuse or reject (someone or something that you do not think is worthy of respect or approval)

scorn

noun
\ ˈskȯrn \

Kids Definition of scorn

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a strong feeling of disgust and anger I have nothing but scorn for cheaters.

2 : an expression of disgust and anger They poured scorn on the idea.

scorn

verb
scorned; scorning

Kids Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

: to show disgust and anger for

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Comments on scorn

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