scorn

noun
\ ˈskȯrn How to pronounce scorn (audio) \

Definition of scorn

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : open dislike and disrespect or mockery often mixed with indignation
2 : an expression of contempt or derision
3 : an object of extreme disdain, contempt, or derision : something contemptible

scorn

verb
\ ˈskȯrn How to pronounce scorn (audio) \
scorned; scorning; scorns

Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to treat with scorn : reject or dismiss as contemptible or unworthy scorned local traditions scorned to reply to the charge

intransitive verb

: to show disdain or derision : scoff

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Other Words from scorn

Verb

scorner noun

Choose the Right Synonym for scorn

Verb

despise, contemn, scorn, disdain mean to regard as unworthy of one's notice or consideration. despise may suggest an emotional response ranging from strong dislike to loathing. despises cowards contemn implies a vehement condemnation of a person or thing as low, vile, feeble, or ignominious. contemns the image of women promoted by advertisers scorn implies a ready or indignant contempt. scorns the very thought of retirement disdain implies an arrogant or supercilious aversion to what is regarded as unworthy. disdained popular music

Examples of scorn in a Sentence

Noun Unlike government censorship, this corruption eats at one of China's more beleaguered professions from within its ranks. The trading of favors for cash is so prevalent that, like the honest cop in a corrupt police unit, an ethical journalist risks the scorn of colleagues. — Gady A. Epstein, Forbes, 21 July 2008 He burns with generous indignation at the scorn with which many literary critics have treated Tolkien, and his subtitle, "author of the Century," is meant to provoke. But provocation is only one of his purposes. — Richard Jenkyns, New Republic, 28 Jan. 2002 Claiming their inalienable rights as teenagers, the two exercise an unmitigated scorn for all adults in the immediate vicinity … — B. Ruby Rich, Nation, 3 & 10 Sept. 2001 They treated his suggestion with scorn. an expression full of scorn Her political rivals have poured scorn on her ideas for improving the tax system. Verb My parents scorned packaged and ready-made foods. It did not matter that, at the time, our hometown was a test-market capital for these sorts of food products; my father still thought that convenience food was a Communist plot, and my mother insisted that only trashy people failed to practice a separation of food groups. — Molly O'Neill, Vogue, January 2007 A union member and activist since age 15, bound for an academic career at Cornell and NYU, Fitch, now past 65, writes like a lover scorned. — Rob Long, National Review, 13 Feb. 2006 Stung by attacks on his new Excursion—a 12.5-m.p.g. guzzler dubbed "Ford Valdez" by critics—he has expressed fears that auto companies could be scorned like tobacco companies if they don't clean up their act. Similarly, GM has sought to position itself as the greenest car company, beginning in 1996 when it launched the nation's first modern, mass-produced electric car, the EV-1. — Margot Roosevelt, Time, 14 Aug. 2000 He scorns anyone who earns less money than he does. Her actions were scorned by many people. They were scorned as fanatics.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Like the target of her scorn, Rangappa also goes by her middle name. Tobias Hoonhout, National Review, "The ‘Principles’ of CNN’s Asha Rangappa," 30 Aug. 2020 Political abuse in America comes in many flavors, few more ugly than the scorn showered by many Indian-Americans on Nikki Haley, arguably the most successful ethnic Indian politician in U.S. history. Tunku Varadarajan, WSJ, "The Smearing of Nikki Haley," 27 Aug. 2020 Her attempts to advocate for herself were often met with scorn and derision by the very institutions who kept her in check. Anne Cohen, refinery29.com, "Megan Fox: “Why Did I Let Myself Get Shit On For Something I Knew Wasn’t True?”," 25 Aug. 2020 Since then Wolf has earned the scorn of many Democrats and some Republicans for sending federal agents to confront protesters in Portland, among other actions. Nick Miroff, Washington Post, "Trump to nominate Chad Wolf to be DHS secretary, nearly 10 months after appointing him to acting role," 25 Aug. 2020 And from Spain, the spiritual and historical home of the guitar, came the loudest scorn of all. The Economist, "Passion plays Julian Bream died on August 14th," 22 Aug. 2020 Hunter Biden, the son of Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and a focal point for GOP scorn, will speak during the final night of the party’s national convention on Thursday. Bart Jansen, USA TODAY, "Live: DNC Day 4 will feature former Vice President Joe Biden accepting the nomination to challenge Trump," 21 Aug. 2020 Idols fall hard, and Marie Curie suffered the scorn of France and the world, yet went on to win a second Nobel Prize that year. Cristine Russell, Scientific American, "The Film Radioactive Shows how Marie Curie Was a "Woman of the Future."," 9 Aug. 2020 Kaepernick’s peaceful protest was met with scorn, derision and threats. Dp Opinion, The Denver Post, "Letters: What if more had knelt with Kaepernick? (6/7/20)," 7 June 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Atlas already has drawn scorn from some public health authorities for his aggressive push to reopen the economy. Erin Allday, SFChronicle.com, "The pandemic is a matter of life and death: Election politics is turning it into a matter of opinion," 5 Sep. 2020 But by doing so, United, Delta and American are abandoning a fee that has drawn particular scorn from customers, consumer advocates and members of Congress. David Koenig, Star Tribune, "Delta, American join United in dropping most US change fees," 31 Aug. 2020 But by doing so, United and now Delta are abandoning a fee that has drawn particular scorn from customers, consumer advocates and members of Congress. David Koenig, chicagotribune.com, "Delta joins United in dropping $200 ticket-change fee for travel within US," 31 Aug. 2020 The fundraiser prompted scorn, including from ASU College Republicans, a separate GOP group at ASU. Madison Dibble, Washington Examiner, "GOP group at Arizona State University raises money for alleged Kenosha gunman," 30 Aug. 2020 But Paradissis has poured scorn on Maguire's claims of innocence. Paul Gittings And Elinda Labropoulou, CNN, "Greek lawyer labels Manchester United star's kidnap claims as 'fiction'," 29 Aug. 2020 At the same time, Republicans scorn Biden as a willing puppet of the left. Joe Garofoli, SFChronicle.com, "Trump will use California to drive home his message: Democrats will wreck America," 23 Aug. 2020 In a brief address, Clinton offered praise for Biden and heaped scorn on Trump. Bill Glauber, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "'With bravery. With unwavering faith.' Jill Biden lauds husband Joe Biden as he claims Democratic presidential nomination," 18 Aug. 2020 Experts poured scorn on the executive order Donald Trump signed on May 28th in reaction to a decision by Twitter, a microblogging service, to flag one of his tweets as unsubstantiated. The Economist, "The moderator’s dilemma Donald Trump has reignited a debate about regulating speech online," 4 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scorn.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of scorn

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for scorn

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French escharne, escar, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German scern jest

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Time Traveler for scorn

Time Traveler

The first known use of scorn was in the 13th century

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Statistics for scorn

Last Updated

8 Sep 2020

Cite this Entry

“Scorn.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scorn. Accessed 20 Sep. 2020.

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More Definitions for scorn

scorn

noun
How to pronounce scorn (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of scorn

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a feeling that someone or something is not worthy of any respect or approval
: harsh criticism that shows a lack of respect or approval for someone or something

scorn

verb
How to pronounce scorn (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

: to show that you think (someone or something) is not worthy of respect or approval : to feel or express scorn for (someone or something)
formal : to refuse or reject (someone or something that you do not think is worthy of respect or approval)

scorn

noun
\ ˈskȯrn How to pronounce scorn (audio) \

Kids Definition of scorn

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a strong feeling of disgust and anger I have nothing but scorn for cheaters.
2 : an expression of disgust and anger They poured scorn on the idea.

scorn

verb
scorned; scorning

Kids Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

: to show disgust and anger for

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Comments on scorn

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