scorn

noun
\ ˈskȯrn How to pronounce scorn (audio) \

Definition of scorn

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : open dislike and disrespect or mockery often mixed with indignation
2 : an expression of contempt or derision
3 : an object of extreme disdain, contempt, or derision : something contemptible

scorn

verb
\ ˈskȯrn How to pronounce scorn (audio) \
scorned; scorning; scorns

Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to treat with scorn : reject or dismiss as contemptible or unworthy scorned local traditions scorned to reply to the charge

intransitive verb

: to show disdain or derision : scoff

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Other Words from scorn

Verb

scorner noun

Choose the Right Synonym for scorn

Verb

despise, contemn, scorn, disdain mean to regard as unworthy of one's notice or consideration. despise may suggest an emotional response ranging from strong dislike to loathing. despises cowards contemn implies a vehement condemnation of a person or thing as low, vile, feeble, or ignominious. contemns the image of women promoted by advertisers scorn implies a ready or indignant contempt. scorns the very thought of retirement disdain implies an arrogant or supercilious aversion to what is regarded as unworthy. disdained popular music

Examples of scorn in a Sentence

Noun

Unlike government censorship, this corruption eats at one of China's more beleaguered professions from within its ranks. The trading of favors for cash is so prevalent that, like the honest cop in a corrupt police unit, an ethical journalist risks the scorn of colleagues. — Gady A. Epstein, Forbes, 21 July 2008 He burns with generous indignation at the scorn with which many literary critics have treated Tolkien, and his subtitle, "author of the Century," is meant to provoke. But provocation is only one of his purposes. — Richard Jenkyns, New Republic, 28 Jan. 2002 Claiming their inalienable rights as teenagers, the two exercise an unmitigated scorn for all adults in the immediate vicinity … — B. Ruby Rich, Nation, 3 & 10 Sept. 2001 They treated his suggestion with scorn. an expression full of scorn Her political rivals have poured scorn on her ideas for improving the tax system.

Verb

My parents scorned packaged and ready-made foods. It did not matter that, at the time, our hometown was a test-market capital for these sorts of food products; my father still thought that convenience food was a Communist plot, and my mother insisted that only trashy people failed to practice a separation of food groups. — Molly O'Neill, Vogue, January 2007 A union member and activist since age 15, bound for an academic career at Cornell and NYU, Fitch, now past 65, writes like a lover scorned. — Rob Long, National Review, 13 Feb. 2006 Stung by attacks on his new Excursion—a 12.5-m.p.g. guzzler dubbed "Ford Valdez" by critics—he has expressed fears that auto companies could be scorned like tobacco companies if they don't clean up their act. Similarly, GM has sought to position itself as the greenest car company, beginning in 1996 when it launched the nation's first modern, mass-produced electric car, the EV-1. — Margot Roosevelt, Time, 14 Aug. 2000 He scorns anyone who earns less money than he does. Her actions were scorned by many people. They were scorned as fanatics.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Boston Unlike Gustav Mahler, who famously predicted that his time would come, but didn’t live to see it, John Corigliano has seen critical reactions to his music shift from scorn to embrace and acknowledgment of his influence. Allan Kozinn, WSJ, "John Corigliano-Boston Modern Orchestra Project Review: Feting an Elder Statesman," 26 Feb. 2019 One person briefed on negotiations said Canada offered concessions regarding its dairy trade regime, which has earned scorn from Mr. Trump because of its high tariffs aimed at thwarting foreign competition. Paul Vieira, WSJ, "U.S., Canada Near a Deal on Nafta as Midnight Deadline Looms," 30 Sep. 2018 Brazilian soccer star Neymar was the subject of scorn during his team's 2-0 win over Mexico in a Round-of-16 match at the World Cup in Russia. Pete Grathoff, kansascity, "Youth soccer team is practicing Neymar's exaggerated World Cup flopping," 5 July 2018 There is perhaps no more virulent form of public scorn than the kind heaped upon the openly unfaithful. Marcia Desanctis, Town & Country, "Mark Sanford, Act II," 14 Feb. 2013 Palmer, lacking resources, moved cautiously at first and earned the scorn of those demanding a crackdown. David Pietrusza, WSJ, "Bombs in the Mail Bring Echoes of Anarchism," 2 Nov. 2018 Rockets fans are pouring on the scorn for Ayesha Curry's new barbecue joint in Houston, which hasn't even opened yet. Thomas Leavy, CBS News, "Ayesha Curry's restaurant slammed by Rockets fans on Yelp before it even opens," 21 June 2018 Apple’s squid emoji, which was integrated in 2016, is on the receiving end of scorn from the scientific community following a tweet from the Monterey Bay Aquarium team. Julia Alexander, The Verge, "Monterey Bay Aquarium takes Apple to task for its backward squid emoji," 5 Dec. 2018 But equally deserving of scorn are all the credulous rich and powerful old men who bought into this house of cards. Jonathan M. Gitlin, Ars Technica, "The downfall of Theranos, from the journalist who made it happen," 15 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

In times gone by, that kind of practice was scorned by industry critics who judged designer potential only on ability to scale. Sarah Mower, Vogue, "The Brexit Deadline Is Looming—Here’s How It Will Affect London Fashion Week," 14 Feb. 2019 It’s participants were scorned as troublemakers and druggies. Jacob Feldman, SI.com, "How Does an Action Sports Superstar Age? Tony Hawk Is Figuring It Out on the Fly," 2 July 2018 Many fans were unhappy with the president’s decision, to say the least, while politicians and players jumped in to scorn Trump. Aubrey Nagle, Philly.com, "Trump cancels Eagles celebration, Krasner wants list of tainted police | Morning Newsletter," 5 June 2018 There’s something for everyone here, whether you’re recently scorned, hoping to reconcile, or dedicating yourself to Botox. Vogue, "These Are the Best Anti–Valentine’s Day Movies to Make You Very Glad You’re Single," 12 Feb. 2019 Author of more than 25 books, Roth was a fierce satirist and uncompromising realist, confronting readers in a bold, direct style that scorned false sentiment or hopes for a heavenly reward. Hillel Italie, USA TODAY, "Philip Roth, Pulitzer Prize-winning author and literary icon, dies at 85," 22 May 2018 Yet shows like The Tudors and Wolf Hall depict her as cunning and scorned, a woman who seduced her dead husband’s brother, who deserves to whither and die alone as a young, virile Henry VIII chases Anne Boleyn. Julie Kosin, Harper's BAZAAR, "The First Teaser Trailer for," 25 Jan. 2019 Developments such as the dada art movement, a reaction to the insanity of the war that rejected logic, embraced irrationality and scorned nationalism, also provide a framework for modern understanding of the widespread effects on society. Chuck Thompson, Popular Mechanics, "What You Need To Know Before Watching "They Shall Not Grow Old"," 28 Dec. 2018 Losing him without compensation was more like a nightmare for scorned Islanders fans, some of whom torched Tavares jerseys instead of Fourth of July firecrackers. Helene Elliott, latimes.com, "The start of NHL free agency allows John Tavares to live his childhood dream with the Toronto Maple Leafs," 2 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scorn.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of scorn

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for scorn

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Anglo-French escharne, escar, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German scern jest

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Learn More about scorn

Dictionary Entries near scorn

scoriform

scorify

scorious

scorn

scornful

scorodite

Scorpaena

Statistics for scorn

Last Updated

23 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for scorn

The first known use of scorn was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for scorn

scorn

noun

English Language Learners Definition of scorn

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a feeling that someone or something is not worthy of any respect or approval
: harsh criticism that shows a lack of respect or approval for someone or something

scorn

verb

English Language Learners Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

: to show that you think (someone or something) is not worthy of respect or approval : to feel or express scorn for (someone or something)
formal : to refuse or reject (someone or something that you do not think is worthy of respect or approval)

scorn

noun
\ ˈskȯrn How to pronounce scorn (audio) \

Kids Definition of scorn

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a strong feeling of disgust and anger I have nothing but scorn for cheaters.
2 : an expression of disgust and anger They poured scorn on the idea.

scorn

verb
scorned; scorning

Kids Definition of scorn (Entry 2 of 2)

: to show disgust and anger for

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More from Merriam-Webster on scorn

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with scorn

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for scorn

Spanish Central: Translation of scorn

Nglish: Translation of scorn for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of scorn for Arabic Speakers

Comments on scorn

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