scone

noun
\ ˈskōn, ˈskän\

Definition of scone

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a rich quick bread cut into usually triangular shapes and cooked on a griddle or baked on a sheet

Scone

geographical name
\ ˈskün \

Definition of Scone (Entry 2 of 2)

locality in eastern Scotland northeast of Perth population 3713

Examples of scone in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

As part of the feature, the duo set about demonstrating a recipe for chocolate chip scones. Lauren Hubbard, Town & Country, "Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York, Is All of Us in This Hilarious Throwback Baking Video with Oprah," 28 Aug. 2018 French Meadow Bakery & Cafe—serves up chipotle goat cheese quesadillas and bison short ribs along with scones and mini cheesecakes. Barbara Peterson, Condé Nast Traveler, "The Best Airports in the U.S.: 2018 Readers' Choice Awards," 9 Oct. 2018 The baking possibilities with this versatile berry are limited only by your imagination; think blueberry pie, coffeecake, doughnuts, pancakes, waffles, muffins, scones and more. Ashleigh Spitza, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "'Little blue dynamos,' blueberries pack in flavor and nutrients," 11 June 2018 So do vintage French art deco Lightolier scones and ceiling fixtures that match the home's originals. Debbie Arrington, sacbee, "Think Sacramento feels like Iowa? They'd agree | The Sacramento Bee," 21 Apr. 2018 Afternoon tea is formal tea with proper tea settings, biscuits, scones and the like. Sarah Solomon, Town & Country, "25 Things I Learned at The Plaza’s Etiquette School," 14 Apr. 2017 The long-standing ritual which includes finger sandwiches, scones, pastries, and more set them back about $30/person. Megan Stein, Country Living, "Christina El Moussa Is on a Vacation with Ant Anstead and His Kids and It Looks Like a Fairytale," 26 July 2018 In the spirit of St. Patrick's Day, these scones from King Arthur Flour celebrate all things Irish. Fox News, "9 sweet treats for St. Patrick's Day," 11 Mar. 2016 Pastry options generally include fresh fruit danishes, pineapple and blueberry scones, and refrigerated cake squares in flavors like guava, chocolate haupia and chantilly (a macadamia nut version of German chocolate). Jill Lightner, The Seattle Times, "Patrick’s Bakery & Cafe: sweet treats and Hawaiian snacks at great prices," 1 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'scone.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of scone

Noun

1513, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for scone

Noun

perhaps from Dutch schoonbrood fine white bread, from schoon pure, clean + brood bread

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Dictionary Entries near scone

Scombroidei

sconce

sconcheon

scone

Scone

scooch

scoop

Statistics for scone

Last Updated

11 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for scone

The first known use of scone was in 1513

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More Definitions for scone

scone

noun

English Language Learners Definition of scone

: a small, often sweet bread that sometimes has pieces of dried fruit in it

More from Merriam-Webster on scone

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with scone

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about scone

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