scathe

1 of 2

noun

ˈskāt͟h How to pronounce scathe (audio)
ˈskāth
scatheless adjective

scathe

2 of 2

verb

scathed; scathing

transitive verb

1
: to do harm to
specifically : scorch, sear
2
: to assail with withering denunciation

Examples of scathe in a Sentence

Verb newspaper cartoonists scathed the lecherous governor with a series of cruel caricatures
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Sky Sports’ Monday Night Football debates always seem to scathe a few players in the new, with last Monday’s discussions centred around Newcastle forward Dwight Gayle. SI.com, 13 Feb. 2018

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'scathe.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English skathe, from Old Norse skathi; akin to Old English sceatha injury, Greek askēthēs unharmed

First Known Use

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of scathe was in the 13th century

Dictionary Entries Near scathe

Cite this Entry

“Scathe.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scathe. Accessed 14 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

scathe

1 of 2 noun
scatheless adjective

scathe

2 of 2 verb
scathed; scathing
1
: to do harm to : injure
especially : to injure by fire : scorch, sear
2
: to attack with very harsh accusations

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