salamander

noun

sal·​a·​man·​der ˈsa-lə-ˌman-dər How to pronounce salamander (audio)
 also  ˌsa-lə-ˈman-
1
: a mythical animal having the power to endure fire without harm
2
: an elemental being in the theory of Paracelsus inhabiting fire
3
: any of numerous amphibians (order Caudata) superficially resembling lizards but scaleless and covered with a soft moist skin and breathing by gills in the larval stage
4
: an article used in connection with fire: such as
a
: a cooking utensil for browning a food (such as pastry or pudding)
b
: a portable stove
c
: a cooking device with an overhead heat source like a broiler
5
: a mass of unfused material (such as metallic iron or partially reduced ore) in the hearth of a blast furnace
6
: the pocket gopher (Geomys tuza) of the southeastern U.S.
salamandrine adjective

Examples of salamander in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Today, the wetland is home to an array of species, including approximately 39 mammals, 200 birds, 38 fish, and several reptiles and amphibians, including Siberian salamanders. Kristen Pope, Travel + Leisure, 8 June 2024 Ridge said some birds, salamanders, weasels, snakes, toads, pigs and raccoons will feed on the worms, but don’t make much difference. Ed Stannard, Hartford Courant, 11 Feb. 2024 Among animals, lungfish and a group of aquatic salamanders have some of the largest genomes. Will Sullivan, Smithsonian Magazine, 4 June 2024 The salamanders were taken from the wild as eggs and brought to the Nashville Zoo to hatch and grow. Olivia Lloyd, Charlotte Observer, 24 May 2024 See all Example Sentences for salamander 

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'salamander.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English salamandre "a reptile believed to live in fire," borrowed from Anglo-French, borrowed from Latin salamandra, borrowed from Greek salamándra, probably of pre-Greek substratal origin

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of salamander was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near salamander

Cite this Entry

“Salamander.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/salamander. Accessed 21 Jun. 2024.

Kids Definition

salamander

noun
sal·​a·​man·​der ˈsal-ə-ˌman-dər How to pronounce salamander (audio)
1
: an imaginary creature not harmed by fire
2
: any of an order of amphibians that are covered with scaleless usually smooth moist skin and look like lizards

More from Merriam-Webster on salamander

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