rogue

noun
\ ˈrōg How to pronounce rogue (audio) \

Definition of rogue

 (Entry 1 of 4)

2 : a dishonest or worthless person : scoundrel
3 : a mischievous person : scamp
4 : a horse inclined to shirk or misbehave
5 : an individual exhibiting a chance and usually inferior biological variation

rogue

verb
rogued; roguing or rogueing

Definition of rogue (Entry 2 of 4)

intransitive verb

: to weed out inferior, diseased, or nontypical individuals from a crop plant or a field

rogue

adjective

Definition of rogue (Entry 3 of 4)

1 : resembling or suggesting a rogue elephant especially in being isolated, aberrant, dangerous, or uncontrollable capsized by a rogue wave
2 : corrupt, dishonest rogue cops
3 : of or being a nation whose leaders defy international law or norms of international behavior rogue states

Rogue

geographical name
\ ˈrōg How to pronounce Rogue (audio) \

Definition of Rogue (Entry 4 of 4)

river about 200 miles (320 kilometers) long in southwestern Oregon rising in Crater Lake National Park and flowing west and southwest into the Pacific Ocean

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Other Words from rogue

Noun

roguish \ ˈrō-​gish How to pronounce roguish (audio) \ adjective
roguishly adverb
roguishness noun

Examples of rogue in a Sentence

Noun Many of the vagabonds were rogues and cheaters of various kinds, and formed a subcommunity on the fringes of official society. — Charles Barber, Early Modern English, 1976 Cartier decided that the two boys were a choice pair of rogues who would probably try to run him aground if taken as pilots, and that he would dispense with their services. — Samuel Eliot Morison, The European Discovery of America, 1971 His account of their discoveries in the low life of a seaport town would have made a charming book, and in the various characters that came their way the student might easily have found matter for a very complete dictionary of rogues. — W. Somerset Maugham, Moon and Sixpence, 1919 He's a lovable old rogue. a rogue who had nothing but contempt for people who made their living honestly Adjective Americans assume that our country was built by rogue males but there's more to the breed than wanderlust and rugged individualism. — Florence King, National Review, 27 Aug. 2007 Perhaps more important, defense planners worried for the past year about the instability of the Soviet Union and the nightmare that a rogue Soviet submarine skipper might decide on his own to launch close to 200 warheads at U.S. targets. — John Barry, Newsweek, 3 June 1991 In "The In-Laws," Alan Arkin is a dentist led astray by a rogue C.I.A. operative …  , whose son his daughter is marrying, and he winds up dodging bullets on a Caribbean island. — Terrence Rafferty, New Yorker, 30 July 1990 a rogue administrator who took bribes to falsify paperwork
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun King’s rogues gallery is deep, and in a year when Pennywise again got most of the headlines, Rose more than holds her own with a tempting menace. Brian Truitt, Detroit Free Press, "Sinister ‘Doctor Sleep’ is a solid ‘Shining’ follow-up," 7 Nov. 2019 Robert Levinson, a former F.B.I. agent who was on a rogue C.I.A. operation, disappeared on Kish Island in 2007. Robin Wright, The New Yorker, "The Hostage Drama in Iran Drags On—Forty Years Later," 4 Nov. 2019 The explanation turns out to be a bit of an eye-roller, but stick with Frisbee, whose otherwise tautly plotted novel won the North American Review’s Gas Station Pulp Crime Noir Contest, and savor the rogue wave of an ending. oregonlive, "8 books to help you get into the spirit of the Halloween season," 20 Oct. 2019 Currently, the rogue regime in the Gulf is the U.S., which blew up the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action on Iran’s nuclear program when the Trump administration pulled out of it a year ago. Washington Post, "Why ‘Maximum Pressure’ on Iran Could Backfire," 20 Sep. 2019 McBride must travel to the edge of the solar system to find his missing father, a brilliant astronaut played by Tommy Lee Jones who went rogue years ago and may be stirring up cosmic trouble that threatens to destroy the Earth. Martha Ross, The Mercury News, "How Brad Pitt has wrestled with ‘toxic masculinity’ since his split from Angelina Jolie," 30 Aug. 2019 In the meantime, the rogue ruler sidestepped taxation laws and whipped up hatred among his subjects, sentiments that fueled a civil war and his eventual execution for treason. Erin Blakemore, National Geographic, "The dramatic history of prorogation in British parliament," 29 Aug. 2019 The rogue image flashed first like an apparition, a spectral splash across billboards, spreading from Allentown to Wilmington to Trenton. Jacob Feldman, SI.com, "Mystery: Who Bought Those ‘Zeke Who?’ Billboards in Philadelphia?," 29 Aug. 2019 Water access is emerging as a lead cause of regional conflict, especially as scarce water falls under the control of rogue black markets. Emily Atkin, The New Republic, "The Blood-Dimmed Tide," 16 Sep. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb But a conservative Court of Appeals panel could rogue and decide to disobey Roe and Casey. Dylan Matthews, Vox, "America under Brett Kavanaugh," 11 July 2018 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Urzikstan—chasing down terrorists and a rogue Russian military faction, both of which are intent on controlling Urzikstan. Wired, "Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Has Nothing Interesting to Say," 1 Nov. 2019 Why, then, is the U.S. still an ally of this anti-American rogue nation? Victor Davis Hanson, National Review, "Untenable Alliance Is No Turkish Delight," 24 Oct. 2019 The only problem is that for some reason the US government has declared my house a 'rogue state' and tried to freeze my bank account. Andrew Daniels, Popular Mechanics, "Did You Know You Can Just … Buy Uranium?," 23 Oct. 2019 Some analysts – citing previous attacks over the summer, one in which involved Iran allegedly downed a $125 million U.S. surveillance drone over international waters – said the rogue nation was operating on a policy of plausible deniability. Fox News, "'Locked and loaded': Military options on table in response to Saudi oil attack as Trump seeks to avoid war," 17 Sep. 2019 The bank has repeatedly denied wrongdoing and claimed that it was misled by rogue employees who intentionally deceived its legal and compliance teams. Jill Disis, CNN, "Goldman Sachs' top international banker among 17 charged over 1MDB scandal," 9 Aug. 2019 In the Friday incident, a rogue ground-crew employee got into a pushback tractor, attached it to the empty aircraft and turned the airplane toward the runways, authorities said. Mike Baker, The Seattle Times, "Sea-Tac officials, airlines to meet Monday to discuss security protocols after turboprop heist," 13 Aug. 2018 Their feast/free lawn care services ended by around 8:30 am local time — about an hour and a half later — when the bosses of We Rent Goats arrived in the neighborhood to round up their rogue employees. Jen Kirby, Vox, "Here are some goats wreaking havoc on a Boise neighborhood," 3 Aug. 2018 There were six other horses, who also tested for levels of scopolamine, which would indicate feed contamination as opposed to a rogue trainer. John Cherwa, Los Angeles Times, "Racing! More on Justify’s positive drug test," 13 Sep. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'rogue.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of rogue

Noun

1561, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1766, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

1835, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for rogue

Noun

of obscure origin

Verb

derivative of rogue entry 1

Adjective

derivative of rogue entry 1

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More Definitions for rogue

rogue

noun
How to pronounce Rogue (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of rogue

 (Entry 1 of 2)

old-fashioned : a man who is dishonest or immoral
: a man who causes trouble in a playful way

rogue

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of rogue (Entry 2 of 2)

used to describe something or someone that is different from others in usually a dangerous or harmful way

rogue

noun
\ ˈrōg How to pronounce rogue (audio) \

Kids Definition of rogue

1 : a dishonest or evil person
2 : a pleasantly mischievous person

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More from Merriam-Webster on rogue

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for rogue

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with rogue

Spanish Central: Translation of rogue

Nglish: Translation of rogue for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of rogue for Arabic Speakers

Comments on rogue

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