rogue

noun
\ ˈrōg \

Definition of rogue 

(Entry 1 of 4)

1 : vagrant, tramp

2 : a dishonest or worthless person : scoundrel

3 : a mischievous person : scamp

4 : a horse inclined to shirk or misbehave

5 : an individual exhibiting a chance and usually inferior biological variation

rogue

verb
rogued; roguing or rogueing

Definition of rogue (Entry 2 of 4)

intransitive verb

: to weed out inferior, diseased, or nontypical individuals from a crop plant or a field

rogue

adjective

Definition of rogue (Entry 3 of 4)

1 : resembling or suggesting a rogue elephant especially in being isolated, aberrant, dangerous, or uncontrollable capsized by a rogue wave

2 : corrupt, dishonest rogue cops

3 : of or being a nation whose leaders defy international law or norms of international behavior rogue states

Rogue

geographical name
\ ˈrōg \

Definition of Rogue (Entry 4 of 4)

river about 200 miles (320 kilometers) long in southwestern Oregon rising in Crater Lake National Park and flowing west and southwest into the Pacific Ocean

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Other words from rogue

Noun

roguish \ˈrō-gish \ adjective
roguishly adverb
roguishness noun

Examples of rogue in a Sentence

Noun

Many of the vagabonds were rogues and cheaters of various kinds, and formed a subcommunity on the fringes of official society. —Charles Barber, Early Modern English, 1976 Cartier decided that the two boys were a choice pair of rogues who would probably try to run him aground if taken as pilots, and that he would dispense with their services. —Samuel Eliot Morison, The European Discovery of America, 1971 His account of their discoveries in the low life of a seaport town would have made a charming book, and in the various characters that came their way the student might easily have found matter for a very complete dictionary of rogues. —W. Somerset Maugham, Moon and Sixpence, 1919 He's a lovable old rogue. a rogue who had nothing but contempt for people who made their living honestly

Adjective

Americans assume that our country was built by rogue males but there's more to the breed than wanderlust and rugged individualism. —Florence King, National Review, 27 Aug. 2007 Perhaps more important, defense planners worried for the past year about the instability of the Soviet Union and the nightmare that a rogue Soviet submarine skipper might decide on his own to launch close to 200 warheads at U.S. targets. —John Barry, Newsweek, 3 June 1991 In "The In-Laws," Alan Arkin is a dentist led astray by a rogue C.I.A. operative …  , whose son his daughter is marrying, and he winds up dodging bullets on a Caribbean island. —Terrence Rafferty, New Yorker, 30 July 1990 a rogue administrator who took bribes to falsify paperwork
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

But Samantha the attendant finally puts a lid on the rogue play, sending Murphy home to his wife early. Amy S. Rosenberg, Philly.com, "Ocean City and the most cutthroat pickleball game at the Jersey Shore," 11 July 2018 Fresenius claims Akorn officials sought to cover up that rogue employees falsified test results and the company's executives submitted the phony findings in three FDA drug applications. Jef Feeley, chicagotribune.com, "Akorn's lax computer security linked to deal cancellation," 10 July 2018 Behind a rogue lightning flash near Silver Spring from a storm in Falls Church] On March 19 this year, a powerful line of storms was approaching the Atlanta metro area from the west. Matthew Cappucci, Washington Post, "Bolts from the blue: Here’s how lightning can strike when a storm is tens of miles away," 27 June 2018 Look for lots of dolphin tricks, including that underwater corkscrew maneuver, macaws in flight (there’s always one rogue one, right?) and Lycra-clad trainers doing that side-to-side and slide dance thing between instructions. Dewayne Bevil, OrlandoSentinel.com, "SeaWorld Orlando sails into summer with free beer, dolphin show, 'Ignite' fireworks, more," 5 June 2018 Rainway researchers reported the rogue malware to the unnamed service provider that hosted it. Dan Goodin, Ars Technica, "Rash of Fortnite cheaters infected by malware that breaks HTTPS encryption," 3 July 2018 Likewise, the show's pirates are lovable rogues, at once endearing and threatening, bloodthirsty and cowardly. Jack Helbig, Chicago Reader, "After 139 years, Pirates of Penzance is still a satisfying combination of sweet and salty," 27 June 2018 There are also questions as to how quickly such machines will proliferate and how to deal with such technology in the hands of rogue, non-state actors. Bloomberg, Fortune, "The U.S. Army Is Planning New, More Complex Battlefield Robots," 18 May 2018 The suit comes as the White House is preparing for a high-stakes meeting between President Donald Trump and North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, with the aim of trying to persuade the rogue nation to denuclearize. Anne Saker, Cincinnati.com, "Warmbiers file lawsuit against North Korea, alleging regime 'tortured and murdered' Otto," 26 Apr. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

But a conservative Court of Appeals panel could rogue and decide to disobey Roe and Casey. Dylan Matthews, Vox, "America under Brett Kavanaugh," 11 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

Image The core elements of the premise — rogue tentacles, prickly villains, a found family and swoon-worthy romances — are familiar to aficionados of genre entertainment. Maureen Ryan, New York Times, "A Cult Show’s Recipe for Success: Whiskey, Twitter and Complex Women," 6 July 2018 During a court hearing Thursday in the case against Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, the special counsel's team indirectly pushed back against assertions that its investigation has gone rogue or corrupt. Veronica Stracqualursi, CNN, "Comey memos, Rudy and Russia: The latest jam-packed news day in Trump's presidency," 20 Apr. 2018 Since then, foreign policy watchers have warned that the move would isolate the US, risk further destabilizing the Middle East, and invite another nuclear rogue nation into the world. Andy Greenberg, WIRED, "The Iran Nuclear Deal's Unraveling Raises Fears of Cyberattacks," 9 May 2018 The thing with fentanyl is, rogue chemists can alter its makeup just slightly and change the drug to create new, sometimes even more powerful, and hard-to-identify fentanyl types. Terry Demio, Cincinnati.com, "Covington business grows with the opioid epidemic," 2 July 2018 According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration website, rogue waves are extremely rare but there are several known causes . Washington Post, "Rogue waves hit Hawaii fishing vessel that sank, owner says," 28 Mar. 2018 And the report uncovered new texts between those two rogue FBI agents having an affair, Peter Strzok and Lisa Page. Fox News, "Two FBI agents sought to 'stop' Trump," 18 June 2018 Yet, in Tehran, Trump’s enthusiastic outreach to a rogue nation with a history of human rights and nonproliferation violations renewed accusations of U.S. hypocrisy. Ramin Mostaghim, latimes.com, "Remember the 'axis of evil'? There's one member left, and its chances for a Trump summit look dim," 14 June 2018 There are doubts that rogue agents could have carried out the attack without approval from the top levels of Russian government. Kara Fox And Katie Polglase, CNN, "Experts unable to identify source of nerve agent used in Skripal attack," 3 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'rogue.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of rogue

Noun

1561, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1766, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

1835, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for rogue

Noun

of obscure origin

Verb

derivative of rogue entry 1

Adjective

derivative of rogue entry 1

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Statistics for rogue

Last Updated

19 Aug 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for rogue

The first known use of rogue was in 1561

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More Definitions for rogue

rogue

noun

English Language Learners Definition of rogue

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a man who is dishonest or immoral

: a man who causes trouble in a playful way

rogue

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of rogue (Entry 2 of 2)

—used to describe something or someone that is different from others in usually a dangerous or harmful way

rogue

noun
\ ˈrōg \

Kids Definition of rogue

1 : a dishonest or evil person

2 : a pleasantly mischievous person

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Comments on rogue

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