rogue

noun
\ ˈrōg How to pronounce rogue (audio) \

Definition of rogue

 (Entry 1 of 4)

1 : vagrant, tramp
2 : a dishonest or worthless person : scoundrel
3 : a mischievous person : scamp
4 : a horse inclined to shirk or misbehave
5 : an individual exhibiting a chance and usually inferior biological variation

rogue

verb
rogued; roguing or rogueing

Definition of rogue (Entry 2 of 4)

intransitive verb

: to weed out inferior, diseased, or nontypical individuals from a crop plant or a field

rogue

adjective

Definition of rogue (Entry 3 of 4)

1 : resembling or suggesting a rogue elephant especially in being isolated, aberrant, dangerous, or uncontrollable capsized by a rogue wave
2 : corrupt, dishonest rogue cops
3 : of or being a nation whose leaders defy international law or norms of international behavior rogue states

Rogue

geographical name
\ ˈrōg How to pronounce Rogue (audio) \

Definition of Rogue (Entry 4 of 4)

river about 200 miles (320 kilometers) long in southwestern Oregon rising in Crater Lake National Park and flowing west and southwest into the Pacific Ocean

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Other Words from rogue

Noun

roguish \ ˈrō-​gish How to pronounce roguish (audio) \ adjective
roguishly adverb
roguishness noun

Examples of rogue in a Sentence

Noun

Many of the vagabonds were rogues and cheaters of various kinds, and formed a subcommunity on the fringes of official society. — Charles Barber, Early Modern English, 1976 Cartier decided that the two boys were a choice pair of rogues who would probably try to run him aground if taken as pilots, and that he would dispense with their services. — Samuel Eliot Morison, The European Discovery of America, 1971 His account of their discoveries in the low life of a seaport town would have made a charming book, and in the various characters that came their way the student might easily have found matter for a very complete dictionary of rogues. — W. Somerset Maugham, Moon and Sixpence, 1919 He's a lovable old rogue. a rogue who had nothing but contempt for people who made their living honestly

Adjective

Americans assume that our country was built by rogue males but there's more to the breed than wanderlust and rugged individualism. — Florence King, National Review, 27 Aug. 2007 Perhaps more important, defense planners worried for the past year about the instability of the Soviet Union and the nightmare that a rogue Soviet submarine skipper might decide on his own to launch close to 200 warheads at U.S. targets. — John Barry, Newsweek, 3 June 1991 In "The In-Laws," Alan Arkin is a dentist led astray by a rogue C.I.A. operative …  , whose son his daughter is marrying, and he winds up dodging bullets on a Caribbean island. — Terrence Rafferty, New Yorker, 30 July 1990 a rogue administrator who took bribes to falsify paperwork
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Meeting at a tech conference in Shanghai, Musk warned of A.I. agents gone rogue, while Ma talked up the promise of super-intelligent computers. Adam Lashinsky, Fortune, "The Best Way to Thwart Hackers and Cyber Crooks—Data Sheet," 30 Aug. 2019 The Cubs went rogue by wearing their blue hats Friday against the Nationals. Sam Fortier, The Denver Post, "MLB wanted to make baseball fun with Players’ Weekend jerseys. It backfired.," 26 Aug. 2019 Indicted and imprisoned, then kidnapped by the very mercenaries who did try to kill the president, Banning has no choice but to go rogue (as per usual). Katie Walsh, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Review: ‘Angel Has Fallen’ but Gerard Butler manages to get up for a third time," 22 Aug. 2019 One former senior federal transportation safety official said NHTSA needs to take a more active role in overseeing self-driving technologies to ensure development is not squandered by a rogue actor taking advantage of a lax regulatory environment. Faiz Siddiqui, Washington Post, "Tesla floats fully self-driving cars as soon as this year. Many are worried about what that will unleash.," 17 July 2019 Under a previous president, such an incident might have been written off as a mistake, or at least a rare case of immigration officials gone rogue. Matt Ford, The New Republic, "Trump’s Cynical War on American Citizenship," 30 July 2019 Ever since Billie Jean King famously went rogue in 1973, defying tennis’s male-dominated governing body to launch her own Women’s Tennis Association, female professional athletes have been waging a battle for equality in nearly every major sport. Rachel Sturtz, Outside Online, "Meet the Billie Jean King of Cycling," 24 July 2019 When planning the 1979 film Apocalypse Now, director Francis Ford Coppola originally imagined one of his main characters, Colonel Walter E. Kurtz, a former Green Beret who has gone rogue in Cambodia, would wear no adornment besides his dog tags. Olivia Martin, Town & Country, "Marlon Brando’s Iconic Rolex Goes Up For Auction," 19 July 2019 In any previous administration, Friedman would be reined in for going rogue; instead, he's been encouraged by his bosses. latimes.com, "Today: Trump’s Envoy of Discord in Israel," 9 July 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

But a conservative Court of Appeals panel could rogue and decide to disobey Roe and Casey. Dylan Matthews, Vox, "America under Brett Kavanaugh," 11 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

There were six other horses, who also tested for levels of scopolamine, which would indicate feed contamination as opposed to a rogue trainer. John Cherwa, Los Angeles Times, "Racing! More on Justify’s positive drug test," 13 Sep. 2019 CBS Sports reported he could potentially have faced a fine from the league for his rogue behavior. Christopher Brito, CBS News, "Wearing 9/11-inspired cleats, Mets get emotional win on anniversary of September 11 attacks," 12 Sep. 2019 As international pressure mounted, the kingdom eventually settled on the explanation that he was killed by rogue officials in a brawl inside their consulate. Fox News, "Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi asked killers not to 'suffocate' him in final words: reports," 11 Sep. 2019 The court also explains, in compelling terms, how the combined misconduct by defense counsel and a few rogue jurors led to an unjust result. Janelle Bitker, SFChronicle.com, "Judge calls for retrial in French Laundry pregnancy discrimination case," 11 Sep. 2019 As international pressure mounted, the kingdom eventually settled on the explanation that he was killed by rogue officials in a brawl inside their consulate. San Diego Union-Tribune, "In last words, Jamal Khashoggi asked his killers not to cover his mouth, report says," 10 Sep. 2019 Drug gangs in the favelas and militia groups led by rogue ex-police regained ground. The Economist, "Police killings in the state of Rio de Janeiro are at a 20-year high," 3 Sep. 2019 According to the film, the pilot was part of a rogue military group called the South African Institute for Maritime Research (SAIMR), which ran covert operations at the behest of the CIA and MI5. Daphne Merkin, The New Republic, "Cold Case Hammarskjöld’s Artful Paranoia," 3 Sep. 2019 Yet there’s no stopping its improvement: Even in the unlikely event that the U.S. banned gene-editing research, other countries (and rogue scientists) would proceed regardless. Robert Verbruggen, National Review, "Death of the ‘Gay Gene’," 3 Sep. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'rogue.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of rogue

Noun

1561, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1766, in the meaning defined above

Adjective

1835, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for rogue

Noun

of obscure origin

Verb

derivative of rogue entry 1

Adjective

derivative of rogue entry 1

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More Definitions for rogue

rogue

noun

English Language Learners Definition of rogue

 (Entry 1 of 2)

old-fashioned : a man who is dishonest or immoral
: a man who causes trouble in a playful way

rogue

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of rogue (Entry 2 of 2)

used to describe something or someone that is different from others in usually a dangerous or harmful way

rogue

noun
\ ˈrōg How to pronounce rogue (audio) \

Kids Definition of rogue

1 : a dishonest or evil person
2 : a pleasantly mischievous person

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More from Merriam-Webster on rogue

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with rogue

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for rogue

Spanish Central: Translation of rogue

Nglish: Translation of rogue for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of rogue for Arabic Speakers

Comments on rogue

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