ridge

noun
\ˈrij \

Definition of ridge 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an elevated body part or structure

2a : a range of hills or mountains

b : an elongate elevation on an ocean bottom

3 : an elongate crest or a linear series of crests

4 : a raised strip (as of plowed ground)

5 : the line of intersection at the top between the opposite slopes or sides of a roof

ridge

verb
ridged; ridging

Definition of ridge (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to form into a ridge

intransitive verb

: to extend in ridges

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Other Words from ridge

Noun

ridged \ ˈrijd \ adjective

Synonyms for ridge

Synonyms: Noun

crest

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Examples of ridge in a Sentence

Noun

We hiked along the ridge. the ridges on the sole of a boot the ridge of a roof
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Akatsuki saw a gigantic ridge at the top of the cloud layer that stayed in place despite the fact that Venus’ atmospheric circulation circumnavigates the globe in just four Earth-days. Scott K. Johnson, Ars Technica, "Huge wave in Venus’ clouds changes the length of a day," 22 June 2018 The devil’s tongue has a ridge that splits it down the center. Karen Russell, The New Yorker, "Orange World," 4 June 2017 From the ridge just short of the summit, wide vistas are visible. Roger Naylor, azcentral, "10 best hikes in Arizona show off state's diverse scenery," 13 July 2018 The avalanche came from a ridge between the nearby Pumori and Lingtren peaks, more than 3,000 feet higher. Alex Hutchinson, Outside Online, "The Devastating Aftermath of an Avalanche on Everest," 6 July 2018 The park gleans its name from a narrow, rocky ridge known as the Devil’s Backbone. Jay Jones, chicagotribune.com, "Pitch a tent, and play outdoors at these 5 Midwest campgrounds," 13 June 2018 But the Afghans didn’t guard the position full-time, and at night Islamic State fighters descended from the ridges and seeded it with mines. Michael M. Phillips, WSJ, "Green Berets Brace for Islamic State Offensive in Afghanistan," 15 May 2018 Spurs are ridges and grooves are channels, often filled with sediment. Martina Schimitschek, sandiegouniontribune.com, "At Scripps, a seascape landscape," 5 July 2018 Among those receiving the cardinals’ biretta — a crimson-red square cap with three ridges — was his point man for helping Rome’s homeless and poor. Washington Post, "Pope to 14 new cardinals: Defend the dignity of the poor," 28 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

High pressure over southeastern Michigan will be ridging into the region on Wednesday resulting in a mixture of clouds and sunshine with temperatures in the 60s and lower 70s. Gary Lessor, courant.com, "Weather Forecast For Wednesday June 6, 2018," 5 June 2018 Sometimes they are ridged, but this is a mere decoration and not a structural element. Julia Moskin, New York Times, "The Best Summer Fries, Ranked," 22 May 2018 Similar to a waffle iron but with shallower grooves, the irons produce two 4- to 5-inch decoratively ridged cookies at a time. baltimoresun.com, "The taste of Italy in a cookie," 18 May 2018 When Mohamed met him, his collarbone ridged out of his skin. Greg Betza, Washington Post, "Syria, a love story," 1 May 2018 High pressure to the north is trying to ridge southward and prevent the heavier snow from crossing the state. Gary Lessor, courant.com, "Here We Go Again: Another Nor'easter Wednesday," 20 Mar. 2018 Heat outdoor grill or ridged grill pan over medium-high heat. Woman's Day, "Chicken Satay," 7 July 2014 This pattern results from ridging along the coast during that period. Katy Moeller, idahostatesman, "Boise’s mild winter confuses bears, but it’s great for those who want to ‘ski and tee’," 31 Jan. 2018 Her stories about finding graveyards involve hiking through woods and climbing to ridge tops. Amy Mcrary, The Seattle Times, "Book details Smokies’ cemeteries and their eternal residents," 23 Dec. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'ridge.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of ridge

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1523, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for ridge

Noun

Middle English rigge, from Old English hrycg; akin to Old High German hrukki ridge, back

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Statistics for ridge

Last Updated

10 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for ridge

The first known use of ridge was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for ridge

ridge

noun

English Language Learners Definition of ridge

: a long area of land that is on top of a mountain or hill

: a raised part or area on the surface of something

: the place where two sloping surfaces meet

ridge

noun
\ˈrij \

Kids Definition of ridge

1 : a range of hills or mountains or its upper part

2 : a raised strip The plow created a ridge of soil.

3 : the line made where two sloping surfaces come together Birds sat perched on the ridge of the roof.

Other Words from ridge

ridged \ ˈrijd \ adjective

ridge

noun
\ˈrij \

Medical Definition of ridge 

: a raised or elevated part and especially a body part: as

a : the projecting or elevated part of the back along the line of the backbone

b : an elevated body part projecting from a surface

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Comments on ridge

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