restorative

adjective
re·​stor·​ative | \ ri-ˈstȯr-ə-tiv How to pronounce restorative (audio) \

Definition of restorative

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: of or relating to restoration especially : having power to restore restorative sleep

restorative

noun

Definition of restorative (Entry 2 of 2)

: something that serves to restore to consciousness, vigor, or health

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Examples of restorative in a Sentence

Adjective the restorative powers of rest took a restorative vitamin mix to improve his immune system Noun Sleep is a powerful restorative.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The old rewards and repercussions are giving way to restorative justice, in which students and educators sit down to sort out what happened. Washington Post, 29 May 2021 Amid disparities, Black doctors use TikTok and Instagram to foster restorative justice and encourage the most vulnerable to get vaccinated. Los Angeles Times, 18 May 2021 What restorative justice might mean for communities experiencing acts of random violence in public, rather than discrimination from a specific entity, is still being hashed out. Eveline Chao, Curbed, 17 May 2021 But $40 million was set aside for economic development and restorative justice programs under the 2021 budget. Alice Yin, chicagotribune.com, 13 May 2021 The organization quickly raised more than $5.5 million toward restorative justice efforts, for victims of the violence and for cultural leaders. Halley Bondy, NBC News, 3 May 2021 Mirani has said in his online materials that his greatest priorities are equity, mental health and restorative justice. Jacob Calvin Meyer, baltimoresun.com, 29 Apr. 2021 Activists last year sought to halt additional spending on SROs at Orange County public schools, saying the money would be better invested in mental health professionals and restorative justice programs. Cristóbal Reyes, orlandosentinel.com, 24 Apr. 2021 To take the think-piece bait: The word reform has inescapable connotations in a song about prison that’s being released in an era when restorative justice and mass incarceration are hotly discussed. Spencer Kornhaber, The Atlantic, 11 May 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Sound baths have nothing to do with a relaxing soak in the tub, and yet more psychiatrists, therapists and other wellness experts are acknowledging the practice as ultra restorative and cleansing. Zee Krstic, Good Housekeeping, 6 May 2021 Billed as an appetizer, the restorative is best experienced at the end of a meal, says Chiou. Washington Post, 19 Mar. 2021 The productions leave little residue in the mind; watching them feels restorative, like a nap. Sarah Manguso, The New York Review of Books, 31 May 2020 Of course, there is something loutish about driving this very proper British convertible so barbarously fast—a little like putting four olives in your afternoon restorative at the Lord's Club. John Phillips, Car and Driver, 20 May 2020 And for a touch of self-care, T Magazine rounded up ingredients that can help transform a simple bath into a restorative, spalike escape. Remy Tumin, New York Times, 20 Mar. 2020 Blue skies and sunshine are uplifting for the spirit and restorative for the soul. Jay Brinker, Cincinnati.com, 6 Mar. 2020 After the flowers knock you out with wonder, the ethereal evening fragrance works like a restorative. R. Daniel Foster, latimes.com, 22 June 2018 Our visit was in late winter — snow had fallen and temperatures had dropped into the 20s — so soup was a welcome restorative: a smooth (vegetarian) purée of white onions that neglected neither the onions’ sweetness nor their natural sharpness. Edward Schneider, New York Times, 21 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'restorative.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of restorative

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for restorative

Time Traveler

The first known use of restorative was in the 14th century

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Statistics for restorative

Last Updated

11 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Restorative.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/restorative. Accessed 14 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for restorative

restorative

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of restorative

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal : having the ability to make a person feel strong or healthy again

restorative

noun

English Language Learners Definition of restorative (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : something that makes a person feel strong or healthy again

restorative

adjective
re·​stor·​ative | \ ri-ˈstōr-ət-iv, -ˈstȯr- How to pronounce restorative (audio) \

Medical Definition of restorative

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: of, relating to, or providing restoration restorative treatment restorative dentistry

restorative

noun

Medical Definition of restorative (Entry 2 of 2)

: something (as a medicine) that serves to restore to consciousness, vigor, or health

More from Merriam-Webster on restorative

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for restorative

Britannica English: Translation of restorative for Arabic Speakers

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