repertoire

noun
rep·er·toire | \ ˈre-pər-ˌtwär , ˈre-pə- \

Definition of repertoire 

1a : a list or supply of dramas, operas, pieces, or parts that a company or person is prepared to perform

b : a supply of skills, devices, or expedients part of the repertoire of a quarterback broadly : amount, supply an endless repertoire of summer clothes

c : a list or supply of capabilities the instruction repertoire of a computer

2a : the complete list or supply of dramas, operas, or musical works available for performance our modern orchestral repertoire

b : the complete list or supply of skills, devices, or ingredients used in a particular field, occupation, or practice the repertoire of literary criticism

Keep scrolling for more

Add This Word History to Your repertoire

The Late Latin noun repertorium, meaning "list," has given us two words that can be used to speak of the broad range of things that someone or something can do. One is repertory, perhaps most commonly known as a word for a company that presents several different plays, operas, or other works at one theater, or the theater where such works are performed. Repertoire, which comes from repertorium via French, once meant the same thing as repertory but later came to refer to the range of skills that a person has under his or her belt, such as the different pitches a baseball pitcher can throw or the particular dishes that are a chef's specialty.

Examples of repertoire in a Sentence

In later years, he sang in English and expanded his repertoire to include rhythm and blues, rock and even skiffle music. —John Swenson, Rolling Stone, 14 Oct. 1993 Jackson is best known for a career that included radio and television concerts and a repertoire that leaned heavily upon songs such as "Amazing Grace" and "The Day is Past and Gone." —Leslie Williams, (New Orleans) Times-Picayune, 12 May 1993 Like resident stock companies, they presented a number of plays in repertoire; the genre of the programs tended to vary, although there seemed to be a preference for popular melodramas … —George Mann, Theatre Lethbridge, 1993 Grenadine … is bright red in color and has a sweet, fresh flavor. It is completely non-alcoholic, but plays an essential part in any good barman's repertoire. The Encyclopedia of Herbs, Spices, & Flavorings, 1992 The fiery orators taking their turn at the microphone wore work shirts and overalls. The college choir sang a repertoire of early Joan Baez. —John Krich, Music in Every Room, 1984 The band's repertoire includes both classic and modern jazz. He has a limited repertoire when it comes to cooking.
See More

Recent Examples on the Web

And yet this does raise the question of what the purpose of SFDanceworks will be in light of Sofranko’s commitments to a larger company with a wider repertoire. Mary Ellen Hunt, SFChronicle.com, "Through the darkness, SFDanceworks takes flight," 9 June 2018 The Matador, 215 N. 8th St., pours 100 varieties of tequila and has a wide repertoire of creative mixed drinks. Dana Oland, idahostatesman, "10 ways to get a real taste of Boise: New spots and beloved staples | Idaho Statesman," 21 May 2018 But when keeping his concentration, Fognini is one of the top players in the world on clay, possessing a vast repertoire. Ravi Ubha, CNN, "Rafael Nadal: Who can stop the 'King of Clay' at the French Open?," 21 May 2018 The promotion of Stevo to our first-ever GM of pop/rock A&R in Nashville recognizes his fantastic accomplishments as an ace A&R exec, as well as the vitality and importance of the city as a diverse, genre-spanning repertoire center. Lilly Milman, Billboard, "Steve Robertson Named General Manager/SVP of Pop-Rock A&R at Atlantic Records Nashville," 12 July 2018 The song had been a staple of their live repertoire since their days as The Quarrymen. John Harrington And Charles Stockdale, USA TODAY, "50 fascinating facts you may not know about The Beatles," 10 July 2018 The next free performance is on July 25 with bassist Steve Clarke, whose repertoire includes R&B and straight-ahead jazz. Alison Kuznitz, courant.com, "Spectra Wired Café Opens Bar5, A Patio And Beer Garden In Downtown Hartford," 28 June 2018 When barbecue expert Steven Raichlen began writing about live-fire cooking, most weekend warriors limited their repertoire to simple items such as burgers, hot dogs and steaks. Noelle Carter, latimes.com, "Steven Raichlen, the 'Julia Child of BBQ,' shares tips and recipes for your summer cookout," 28 June 2018 The young sparrows mimic the songs sung by their elders so accurately that their musical repertoire has remained relatively unchanged for all that time. Robert Lachlan, National Geographic, "This Bird Has Been Singing the Same Song for 1,000 Years," 20 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'repertoire.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of repertoire

1819, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for repertoire

French répertoire, from Late Latin repertorium — see repertory

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about repertoire

Share repertoire

Listen to Our Podcast about repertoire

Statistics for repertoire

Last Updated

14 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for repertoire

The first known use of repertoire was in 1819

See more words from the same year

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for repertoire

repertoire

noun

English Language Learners Definition of repertoire

: all the plays, songs, dances, etc., that a performer or group of performers knows and can perform

: all the things that a person is able to do

repertoire

noun
rep·er·toire | \ ˈre-pər-ˌtwär \

Kids Definition of repertoire

: a list or supply of plays, operas, or pieces that a company or person is prepared to perform

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on repertoire

What made you want to look up repertoire? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

by word of mouth

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Name that Food Quiz

Name That Thing

Test your visual vocabulary with our 10-question challenge!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Dictionary Devil

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!