regurgitate

verb
re·​gur·​gi·​tate | \ (ˌ)rē-ˈgər-jə-ˌtāt How to pronounce regurgitate (audio) \
regurgitated; regurgitating

Definition of regurgitate

intransitive verb

: to become thrown or poured back

transitive verb

: to throw or pour back or out from or as if from a cavity regurgitate food memorized facts to regurgitate on the exam

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Did You Know?

Something regurgitated has typically been taken in, at least partially digested, and then spit back out . . . either literally or figuratively. The word often appears in biological contexts (e.g., in describing how some birds feed their chicks by regurgitating incompletely digested food), or in references to ideas or information that have been acquired and restated. A student, for example, might be expected to learn information from a textbook or a teacher and then regurgitate it for a test. Regurgitate, which entered the English vocabulary in the mid-17th century, is of Latin origin and traces back to the Latin word for "whirlpool," which is gurges.

Examples of regurgitate in a Sentence

The bird regurgitates to feed its young. The bird regurgitates food to feed its young. She memorized the historical dates only to regurgitate them on the exam. The speaker was just regurgitating facts and figures.
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Recent Examples on the Web People with rumination disorder repeatedly regurgitate their food and then re-chew, re-swallow, or spit it out. Colleen Murphy, Health.com, "The Different Types of Eating Disorders—What They Are and What You Need to Know About Them," 24 Feb. 2021 Trust me, a diamond ring sounds nice, but as womxn of color, we are constantly questioned about our capabilities, so a degree is a tangible piece of evidence that defies patriarchal norms that regurgitate demeaning ideals for womxn. Fairoj Tashnia, refinery29.com, "Why I Want A Degree In My Hand Before A Ring On My Finger," 30 Oct. 2020 Like many owls, barn owls swallow prey whole, then regurgitate tough material like fur and bone into what’s called an owl pellet. National Geographic, "Barn owl," 31 Oct. 2020 Any analysis the Trump White House commissions, of course, might well just regurgitate talking points from the American Petroleum Institute. Kate Aronoff, The New Republic, "Are You Fracking Kidding Me, Trump?," 28 Oct. 2020 Asset managers return their investors’ capital about as often as sharks regurgitate swimmers without a scratch. Jason Zweig, WSJ, "‘Our Recent Performance Sucks.’ Here’s Your $10 Billion Back.," 23 Oct. 2020 Two construction workers in Ohio who recently spoke to the Economist are the president’s platonic ideal—voters who simply regurgitate the president’s own highly misleading statements. Alex Shephard, The New Republic, "Why Aren’t Voters Blaming Donald Trump for the Bad Economy?," 15 Sep. 2020 Sick deer foam at the mouth, regularly regurgitate and have diarrhea. Peter Fimrite, SFChronicle.com, "California wildlife officials: Help deer stop congregating, deadly outbreak is killing them," 6 Aug. 2020 Rubio was regurgitating the FBI’s talking points about how tasking informants to chat up Trump campaign officials about the campaign’s purported collusion with Russia was somehow not investigating the campaign. Andrew C. Mccarthy, National Review, "More Media Misdirection on Trump-Russia," 22 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'regurgitate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of regurgitate

1578, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for regurgitate

Medieval Latin regurgitatus, past participle of regurgitare, from Latin re- + Late Latin gurgitare to engulf, from Latin gurgit-, gurges whirlpool — more at voracious

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Time Traveler for regurgitate

Time Traveler

The first known use of regurgitate was in 1578

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Cite this Entry

“Regurgitate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/regurgitate. Accessed 10 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for regurgitate

regurgitate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of regurgitate

: to bring food that has been swallowed back to and out of the mouth
disapproving : to repeat (something, such as a fact, idea, etc.) without understanding it

regurgitate

verb
re·​gur·​gi·​tate | \ rē-ˈgər-jə-ˌtāt How to pronounce regurgitate (audio) \
regurgitated; regurgitating

Kids Definition of regurgitate

: to bring food that has been swallowed back to and out of the mouth

regurgitate

verb
re·​gur·​gi·​tate | \ (ˈ)rē-ˈgər-jə-ˌtāt How to pronounce regurgitate (audio) \
regurgitated; regurgitating

Medical Definition of regurgitate

intransitive verb

: to become thrown or poured back

transitive verb

: to throw or pour back or out from or as if from a cavity regurgitate swallowed food into the mouth

More from Merriam-Webster on regurgitate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for regurgitate

Nglish: Translation of regurgitate for Spanish Speakers

Comments on regurgitate

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