voracious

adjective
vo·​ra·​cious | \ vȯ-ˈrā-shəs How to pronounce voracious (audio) , və- \

Definition of voracious

1 : having a huge appetite : ravenous
2 : excessively eager : insatiable a voracious reader

Other Words from voracious

voraciously adverb
voraciousness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for voracious

voracious, gluttonous, ravenous, rapacious mean excessively greedy. voracious applies especially to habitual gorging with food or drink. teenagers are often voracious eaters gluttonous applies to one who delights in eating or acquiring things especially beyond the point of necessity or satiety. an admiral who was gluttonous for glory ravenous implies excessive hunger and suggests violent or grasping methods of dealing with food or with whatever satisfies an appetite. a nation with a ravenous lust for territorial expansion rapacious often suggests excessive and utterly selfish acquisitiveness or avarice. rapacious developers indifferent to environmental concerns

Did you know?

Voracious is one of several English words that derive from the Latin verb vorare, which means "to eat greedily" or "to devour." Vorare is also an ancestor of devour and of the -ivorous words, which describe the diets of various animals. These include carnivorous ("meat-eating"), herbivorous ("plant-eating"), omnivorous ("feeding on both animals and plants"), frugivorous ("fruit-eating"), graminivorous ("feeding on grass"), and piscivorous ("fish-eating").

Veracious or voracious?

Take care to distinguish between the near-homophones veracious and voracious, whose similarities in sound mask utterly different meanings. Veracious (“honest, truthful”), like its cousins veritable, verify, and very, concerns that which is true. Voracious (”having a greedy or insatiable appetite”), on the other hand, describes the urge to consume large quantities of something, often food, books, or ideas. One way to remember the difference is that the one with the E as its second letter means "truE," and the one with the O as its second letter means "ravenOus." Not coincidentally, these adjectives have near-homophonous noun derivatives: veracity ("truthfulness") and voracity ("the quality or state of being voracious").

Examples of voracious in a Sentence

He has a voracious appetite. it seemed like the voracious kitten was eating her weight in food every day
Recent Examples on the Web Their voracious caterpillars have caused widespread damage to forests, parks and trees in streets and yards. Beth Botts, Chicago Tribune, 18 June 2022 Smallmouth bass, even more voracious, arrived in the 1990s. Brittany Peterson And John Flesher, USA TODAY, 15 June 2022 Smallmouth bass, even more voracious, arrived in the 1990s. CBS News, 15 June 2022 The disconnect is a result of India’s uneven growth, which is powered by the voracious consumption of the country’s upper strata but whose benefits often do not extend beyond the urban middle class. New York Times, 13 June 2022 The wine is named for the voracious hares that feed on the sap of grapevines, causing damage to vineyards. Ellen Bhang, BostonGlobe.com, 7 June 2022 This level of success reveals a voracious desire for innovation and high performance — principles that help McLaren stay one step ahead of the competition. Forbes, 1 June 2022 Goldfish, as voracious eaters, will devour snails, small insects, fish eggs, and young fish—and will wildly out-compete native fish. Elizabeth Gamillo, Smithsonian Magazine, 31 May 2022 As a teenager, the voracious bookworm became frustrated with the cumbersome, inadequate technology available to blind and visually impaired readers. Robert Gauthier, Los Angeles Times, 27 May 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'voracious.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of voracious

1635, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for voracious

Latin vorac-, vorax, from vorare to devour; akin to Old English ācweorran to guzzle, Latin gurges whirlpool, Greek bibrōskein to devour

Learn More About voracious

Time Traveler for voracious

Time Traveler

The first known use of voracious was in 1635

See more words from the same year

Listen to Our Podcast About voracious

Dictionary Entries Near voracious

-vora

voracious

voracity

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for voracious

Last Updated

22 Jun 2022

Cite this Entry

“Voracious.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/voracious. Accessed 3 Jul. 2022.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More Definitions for voracious

voracious

adjective
vo·​ra·​cious | \ vȯ-ˈrā-shəs How to pronounce voracious (audio) , və- \

Kids Definition of voracious

1 : very hungry : having a huge appetite
2 : very eager a voracious reader

Other Words from voracious

voraciously adverb

More from Merriam-Webster on voracious

Nglish: Translation of voracious for Spanish Speakers

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Which Word Does Not Belong?

  • one green toy robot amidst many red toy robots
  • Which of these words does not mean "nonsense"?
True or False

Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!