rapport

noun
rap·​port | \ ra-ˈpȯr How to pronounce rapport (audio) , rə-\

Definition of rapport

: a friendly, harmonious relationship especially : a relationship characterized by agreement, mutual understanding, or empathy that makes communication possible or easy

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Did You Know?

Report comes from the French verb reporter and rapport comes from the French rapporter. Both verbs mean "to bring back" and can be traced back to the Latin verb portare, meaning "to carry." Rapporter also has the additional sense of "to report," which influenced the original English meaning of rapport ("an act or instance of reporting"). That sense of rapport dropped out of regular use by the end of the 19th century.

Examples of rapport in a Sentence

Carter had some conventional assets. Although he was a southerner, he had an easy rapport with blacks and the early support of some key black leaders in his home state … — Jack W. Germond, Fat Man in a Middle Seat, 2002 The name "horse whisperer" appears to be an ancient one from the British Isles, given to people whose rapport with horses seemed almost mystical. — Paul Trachtman, Smithsonian, May 1998 … is said to have established an unusual rapport with the Afghan officers through demonstrating his respect for their traditions and way of life. — Carey Schofield, The Russian Elite, 1993 Moreover, I shall … be arguing that the strength of even the more formal Southern writers stems from their knowledge of and rapport with the language spoken by the unlettered. — Cleanth Brooks, The Language of the American South, 1985 He quickly developed a good rapport with the other teachers. She works hard to build rapport with her patients. There is a lack of rapport between the members of the group.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Thompson and Hemsworth's easy rapport helps carry the film through its rough patches. Brian Lowry, CNN, "'Men in Black' can't catch lightning despite 'Thor' duo," 12 June 2019 This isn’t the first time Beckinsale has shared examples of the mother-daughter duo’s funny rapport. Ashley Boucher, PEOPLE.com, "Kate Beckinsale Asks Her Daughter if She's Doing 'a Lot of Cocaine' During a Relatable Mom Moment," 4 June 2019 Israel’s chief predator ecologist for Golan, Alon Reichman, says that scientists and ranchers need to establish a certain level of rapport. Josh Adler, National Geographic, "Making peace in the Golan Heights—between humans and wolves," 11 Apr. 2019 Trump has an easy rapport with Kudlow, 70, other advisers said, in part because of their long history together in New York. Author: Ashley Parker, Josh Dawsey, Philip Rucker, Anchorage Daily News, "With new West Wing cast, Trump calls shots, aides follow," 29 May 2018 Meanwhile, Hannah has been killing it at nabbing time with Underwood, staying out of the drama (of which there's a LOT this season) and just quietly building a good rapport with the former football player. Katherine J. Igoe, Marie Claire, "Hannah Godwin From 'The Bachelor' Has a History With This 'Bachelorette' Alum," 8 Feb. 2019 Wheeler also appears to be trying to build a rapport directly with the EPA's press corps. Dino Grandoni, Washington Post, "The Energy 202: The EPA won't change policy after Pruitt. But it might be more transparent about it.," 10 July 2018 What impressed throughout Friday’s performance, with Mario Venzago on the podium ensuring a close rapport between soloist and ensemble, was the integrity Armstrong brought to the score. Tim Smith, baltimoresun.com, "A May of Mozart and other treats from BSO, Freiburg Baroque Orchestra," 23 May 2018 Building an early rapport, especially with Victor Oladipo, would serve as the cement needed to solidify the franchise’s new young cornerstones. Jake Fischer, SI.com, "Pacers Building Block Myles Turner is a Star Wars Legos Master," 21 Mar. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'rapport.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of rapport

1660, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for rapport

French, from rapporter to bring back, refer, from Old French raporter to bring back, from re- + aporter to bring, from Latin apportare, from ad- ad- + portare to carry — more at fare

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Statistics for rapport

Last Updated

17 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for rapport

The first known use of rapport was in 1660

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More Definitions for rapport

rapport

noun

English Language Learners Definition of rapport

formal : a friendly relationship

rapport

noun
rap·​port | \ ra-ˈpȯr How to pronounce rapport (audio) \

Kids Definition of rapport

: a friendly relationship

rapport

noun
rap·​port | \ ra-ˈpȯ(ə)r, rə- How to pronounce rapport (audio) \

Medical Definition of rapport

: harmonious accord or relation that fosters cooperation, communication, or trust rapport between a patient and psychotherapist

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More from Merriam-Webster on rapport

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with rapport

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for rapport

Spanish Central: Translation of rapport

Nglish: Translation of rapport for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of rapport for Arabic Speakers

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