prodigious

adjective
pro·​di·​gious | \ prə-ˈdi-jəs How to pronounce prodigious (audio) \

Definition of prodigious

1 : causing amazement or wonder
2 : extraordinary in bulk, quantity, or degree : enormous
3a : resembling or befitting a prodigy : strange, unusual
b obsolete : being an omen : portentous

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Other Words from prodigious

prodigiously adverb
prodigiousness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for prodigious

monstrous, prodigious, tremendous, stupendous mean extremely impressive. monstrous implies a departure from the normal (as in size, form, or character) and often carries suggestions of deformity, ugliness, or fabulousness. the monstrous waste of the project prodigious suggests a marvelousness exceeding belief, usually in something felt as going far beyond a previous maximum (as of goodness, greatness, intensity, or size). made a prodigious effort and rolled the stone aside tremendous may imply a power to terrify or inspire awe. the tremendous roar of the cataract stupendous implies a power to stun or astound, usually because of size, numbers, complexity, or greatness beyond description. a stupendous volcanic eruption

Examples of prodigious in a Sentence

Graceful afield and afoot in his youth, he bullied into a prodigious slugger in his final years. — Tom Verducci, Sports Illustrated, 28 July 2003 She had what was known in those days as a hollow leg, meaning she was able to drink prodigious amounts of liquor without getting drunk, or so she thought. Vanity Fair, July 2000 … Isaac [Newton] was allowed to resume at Grantham and go on to Cambridge, where … he was to remain for nearly thirty-five secluded, prodigious years. — John Updike, New Yorker, 30 Mar. 1998 stage magicians performing prodigious feats for rapt audiences a prodigious supply of canned food kept in the basement for emergencies
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Recent Examples on the Web This thoughtful young man, this prodigious, big-hitting talent, is just three strokes out of the lead halfway through the Masters. Christine Brennan, USA TODAY, 10 Apr. 2021 Armed with one of the most powerful lineups in baseball and a deeper starting rotation than before, the Yankees hope to end a championship drought that enters its 12th season despite their prodigious talent and spending. James Wagner, New York Times, 1 Apr. 2021 Today, the 41-year-old native of Liberty Heights, Miami, is widely lauded for his prodigious talents—but for the young Jenkins entering Florida State University, this was hardly foreseen. Jennifer Ogunsola, Essence, 26 Feb. 2021 His prodigious power, quick hands, Gold Glove defense and instinctive style of play have transformed him into one of the best shortstops in baseball. Meghan Montemurro, chicagotribune.com, 4 Apr. 2021 Historians theorize that the giant’s prodigious phallus, which measures 26 feet in length, may have been intended as a fertility aid, according to BBC News. David Kindy, Smithsonian Magazine, 14 May 2021 With their prodigious resources, programming talent and dominant market position, U.S. companies have the ability to dictate the design of many products used by the rest of the world. Richard Fontaine And Kara Frederick, WSJ, 7 May 2021 At times during his freshman season, the star 7-footer appeared unwilling to use those prodigious skills to take control of a game. Ryan Kartje, Los Angeles Times, 16 Apr. 2021 The move would represent another attempt to monetize Saudi Arabia’s prodigious oil assets—once considered so strategic that even a minority stake sale seemed far-fetched. WSJ, 28 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'prodigious.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of prodigious

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3b

History and Etymology for prodigious

see prodigy

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Time Traveler for prodigious

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The first known use of prodigious was in the 15th century

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Last Updated

9 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Prodigious.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/prodigious. Accessed 17 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for prodigious

prodigious

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of prodigious

formal
: amazing or wonderful : very impressive
: very big

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