prodigious

adjective
pro·​di·​gious | \ prə-ˈdi-jəs How to pronounce prodigious (audio) \

Definition of prodigious

1 : causing amazement or wonder
2 : extraordinary in bulk, quantity, or degree : enormous
3a : resembling or befitting a prodigy : strange, unusual
b obsolete : being an omen : portentous

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Other Words from prodigious

prodigiously adverb
prodigiousness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for prodigious

monstrous, prodigious, tremendous, stupendous mean extremely impressive. monstrous implies a departure from the normal (as in size, form, or character) and often carries suggestions of deformity, ugliness, or fabulousness. the monstrous waste of the project prodigious suggests a marvelousness exceeding belief, usually in something felt as going far beyond a previous maximum (as of goodness, greatness, intensity, or size). made a prodigious effort and rolled the stone aside tremendous may imply a power to terrify or inspire awe. the tremendous roar of the cataract stupendous implies a power to stun or astound, usually because of size, numbers, complexity, or greatness beyond description. a stupendous volcanic eruption

Examples of prodigious in a Sentence

Graceful afield and afoot in his youth, he bullied into a prodigious slugger in his final years. — Tom Verducci, Sports Illustrated, 28 July 2003 She had what was known in those days as a hollow leg, meaning she was able to drink prodigious amounts of liquor without getting drunk, or so she thought. Vanity Fair, July 2000 … Isaac [Newton] was allowed to resume at Grantham and go on to Cambridge, where … he was to remain for nearly thirty-five secluded, prodigious years. — John Updike, New Yorker, 30 Mar. 1998 stage magicians performing prodigious feats for rapt audiences a prodigious supply of canned food kept in the basement for emergencies
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Recent Examples on the Web Known for his prodigious power, Torkelson starred for three seasons at Arizona State before heading into this season as the consensus top pick. Anthony Fenech, Detroit Free Press, "Spencer Torkelson's dream comes true in 'cool moment' at Detroit Tigers' Comerica Park," 7 July 2020 Bottle of Lies is based on a decade of prodigious research and investigation in six foreign countries and throughout the United States. Daniel J. Kevles, The New York Review of Books, "The Scandal of Our Drug Supply," 6 July 2020 The novices are part of a global wave of individual traders, who have been lured into markets by prodigious volatility and with the encouragement of influential social-media users. Frances Yoon, WSJ, "Cub Investors, Taking Cues From YouTube Gurus, Help Hoist Korean Stocks," 3 July 2020 The Hamiltons put everything on the line so that a prodigious talent could succeed. Aimee Lewis, CNN, "Lewis Hamilton, Formula One's voice and conscience," 2 July 2020 That prodigious output may seem to contradict his famous reticence during oral arguments. The Economist, "Radical justice Will Clarence Thomas stick it out for a 30th year on the court?," 27 June 2020 The typical American owner has more than one rabbit, so speed dating is important, because rabbits, despite their prodigious ability to multiply, don’t always get along. Susan Orlean, The New Yorker, "The Rabbit Outbreak," 29 June 2020 Ms Gideon is telegenic and a prodigious fundraiser, raking in more this cycle than Ms Collins. The Economist, "The Maine Senate race The bid to unseat the last New England Republican in Congress," 20 June 2020 To put the prodigious tree in perspective, 1 to 4 bushels was average at the time. Paula Allen, ExpressNews.com, "Hunt is on for massive San Antonio pecan tree photographed in early 1900s by controversial eugenics promoter," 13 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'prodigious.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of prodigious

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3b

History and Etymology for prodigious

see prodigy

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Time Traveler for prodigious

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The first known use of prodigious was in the 15th century

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Last Updated

14 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Prodigious.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/prodigious. Accessed 14 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for prodigious

prodigious

adjective
How to pronounce prodigious (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of prodigious

formal
: amazing or wonderful : very impressive
: very big

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Comments on prodigious

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