pregnant

adjective

preg·​nant ˈpreg-nənt How to pronounce pregnant (audio)
1
: containing a developing embryo, fetus, or unborn offspring within the body : gravid
2
3
: rich in significance or implication
the pregnant phrases of the BibleEdmund Wilson
a pregnant pause
4
: having possibilities of development or consequence : involving important issues : momentous
draw inspiration from the heroic achievements of that pregnant ageKemp Malone
5
: abounding in fancy, wit, or resourcefulness : inventive
all this has been said … by great and pregnant artistsThe Times Literary Supplement (London)
6
archaic : cogent
7
obsolete : inclined, disposed
your own most pregnant and vouchsafed earWilliam Shakespeare
pregnantly adverb

Examples of pregnant in a Sentence

She got pregnant soon after her marriage. There was a pregnant pause before the winner was announced.
Recent Examples on the Web Brandon married for a second time in January 2020 to his pregnant fiancée Cayley Stoker at the Santa Barbara Courthouse. Lynsey Eidell, Peoplemag, 27 Feb. 2024 But nearly every pregnant person will get a condition called diastasis recti (DR), when the abdominal muscles separate to allow room for a growing uterus.1 For many parents, that ab separation can last long after the pregnancy is over. Alesandra Dubin, Parents, 27 Feb. 2024 The video would also discuss conditions that can threaten the life or health of a pregnant woman and the criteria that providers might use to decide the best course of treatment. Arielle Zionts, NPR, 27 Feb. 2024 Supporters said the measure would bring civil law in line with existing state criminal law that allows for additional penalties against people charged with harming a pregnant woman. Lori Rozsa, Washington Post, 27 Feb. 2024 The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women provides supplemental nutritious foods and nutrition information to pregnant women, infants and children under 5 years old. USA TODAY, 26 Feb. 2024 Her family confirmed that Mooney was two months pregnant at the time of her death. Summer Lin, Los Angeles Times, 23 Feb. 2024 Listeria are bacteria that can contaminate many foods and primarily affect pregnant people and their newborns, adults age 65 or older, and people with weakened immune systems, according to the CDC. The Arizona Republic, 23 Feb. 2024 Because of the danger to fetuses and newborns, pregnant women are a prime risk group. Jon Healey, Los Angeles Times, 15 Feb. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'pregnant.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English, from Latin praegnant-, praegnans carrying a fetus, alteration of praegnas, from prae- pre- + -gnas (akin to gignere to give birth to) — more at kin

First Known Use

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 6

Time Traveler
The first known use of pregnant was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near pregnant

Cite this Entry

“Pregnant.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pregnant. Accessed 5 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

pregnant

adjective
preg·​nant ˈpreg-nənt How to pronounce pregnant (audio)
1
: containing a developing embryo, fetus, or unborn offspring within the body
2
: full of meaning
a pregnant pause
pregnantly adverb

Medical Definition

pregnant

adjective
preg·​nant ˈpreg-nənt How to pronounce pregnant (audio)
: containing a developing embryo, fetus, or unborn offspring within the body : gestating, gravid

More from Merriam-Webster on pregnant

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