gestate

verb
ges·​tate | \ ˈje-ˌstāt How to pronounce gestate (audio) \
gestated; gestating

Definition of gestate

transitive verb

1 : to carry in the uterus during pregnancy
2 : to conceive and gradually develop in the mind

intransitive verb

: to be in the process of gestation

Examples of gestate in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web In the meantime, Reilly’s plan to re-examine—and perhaps restrict—the use of climate models will have had a chance to gestate further. Adam Federman, Wired, "The Trump Team Has a Plan to Not Fight Climate Change," 15 Sep. 2020 By alternating embryo implantations between two reproductive tracts—each with its own uterus and cervix—these marsupials can gestate nonstop throughout their entire adulthoods, staying knocked up for up to seven years straight, Menzies estimates. Katherine J. Wu, Smithsonian Magazine, "Swamp Wallabies Can Get Pregnant While Pregnant," 2 Mar. 2020 But his mature art, which took two decades to gestate before consolidating in the nineteen-twenties, is timeless, or perhaps time-free: a series of freeze-dried, uncannily telling moments. Peter Schjeldahl, The New Yorker, "Edward Hopper and American Solitude," 1 June 2020 An unanticipated problem was encountered, check back soon and try again Jennifer Lopez wants Reese Witherspoon to get right with her long-gestating Legally Blonde sequel. Joey Nolfi, EW.com, "Jennifer Lopez tells Reese Witherspoon to film Legally Blonde 3, already!," 7 Apr. 2020 That explains how a woman in Bangladesh gave birth to one baby and then had twins, who were gestating in her other uterus, nearly a month later. Katherine Hobson, New York Times, "Know Your Uterus," 18 Apr. 2020 Steven Spielberg’s ambitious adaptation of a long-gestating Stanley Kubrick project—has already weathered catastrophe. David Sims, The Atlantic, "22 Movies About the End of the World to Watch Now," 18 Apr. 2020 The long-gestating Chaos Walking will also keep its Jan. 22, 2021, release. Mia Galuppo, The Hollywood Reporter, "Lionsgate Sets New Dates for 'John Wick 4,' 'Spiral'," 1 May 2020 Dirt is the long-gestating sequel to Heat, Buford’s 2006 book about leaving his prestigious job at The New Yorker to become a lowly apprentice in the kitchen of the (now-disgraced) chef Mario Batali. Ryu Spaeth, The New Republic, "Cooking While the World Falls Apart," 30 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'gestate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of gestate

1858, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for gestate

back-formation from gestation

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Time Traveler for gestate

Time Traveler

The first known use of gestate was in 1858

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Statistics for gestate

Cite this Entry

“Gestate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gestate. Accessed 5 Mar. 2021.

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More Definitions for gestate

gestate

verb
ges·​tate | \ ˈjes-ˌtāt How to pronounce gestate (audio) \
gestated; gestating

Medical Definition of gestate

transitive verb

: to carry in the uterus during pregnancy

intransitive verb

: to be in the process of gestation

Comments on gestate

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