predict

verb
pre·​dict | \ pri-ˈdikt \
predicted; predicting; predicts

Definition of predict

transitive verb

: to declare or indicate in advance especially : foretell on the basis of observation, experience, or scientific reason

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Other Words from predict

predictability \ pri-​ˌdik-​tə-​ˈbi-​lə-​tē \ noun
predictable \ pri-​ˈdik-​tə-​bəl \ adjective
predictive \ pri-​ˈdik-​tiv \ adjective
predictively \ pri-​ˈdik-​tiv-​lē \ adverb
predictor \ pri-​ˈdik-​tər \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for predict

foretell, predict, forecast, prophesy, prognosticate mean to tell beforehand. foretell applies to the telling of the coming of a future event by any procedure or any source of information. seers foretold the calamity predict commonly implies inference from facts or accepted laws of nature. astronomers predicted an eclipse forecast adds the implication of anticipating eventualities and differs from predict in being usually concerned with probabilities rather than certainties. forecast snow prophesy connotes inspired or mystic knowledge of the future especially as the fulfilling of divine threats or promises. prophesying a new messiah prognosticate is used less often than the other words; it may suggest learned or skilled interpretation, but more often it is simply a colorful substitute for predict or prophesy. prognosticating the future

Examples of predict in a Sentence

All the local forecasters are predicting rain for this afternoon. She claims that she can predict future events. It's hard to predict how the election will turn out. Many people predicted that the store would fail, but it has done very well. Sales are predicted to be the same as last year.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Conglomerates are narrowing their focus to one or two fields, a trend that Mr. Gallea predicts will generate more deal activity. Ben Dummett, WSJ, "A Big Year for Deals—and Deal Makers," 30 Dec. 2018 Our system of government was built by men who predicted and feared an out-of-control president. Ezra Klein, Vox, "Trump endangers America because congressional Republicans let him," 21 Dec. 2018 The famous marshmallow test that predicts future success, based on which kids can resist an immediate treat? Liz Weston, The Seattle Times, "Liz Weston: You don’t have to live by these money myths," 17 Dec. 2018 The parts of the health unit dedicated to pure research — like those developing algorithms that can predict eye disease and breast cancer — will remain under DeepMind’s control. James Vincent, The Verge, "Privacy advocates sound the alarm after Google grabs DeepMind UK health app," 14 Nov. 2018 Zakary Dychtwald, a consultant to the tourism business in China, thinks her estimates might be overstated, but only slightly, citing Goldman Sachs data that predicts a rise to 220 million by 2025. Mark Ellwood, Condé Nast Traveler, "How Chinese Tourists Are Changing the Travel Landscape," 2 Nov. 2018 But careful observers might have noticed a comment by Danny that predicted Luis's return. Jennifer Aldrich, Country Living, "A 'Blue Bloods' Character Everyone Thought Was Dead Is About to Make a Shocking Return," 2 Nov. 2018 The federal government as soon as this month is expected to clarify some more specifics that observers predict will truly trigger a commotion in the world of high finance. Theodore Schleifer, Recode, "The new hotness for tech billionaires? Do-gooder investments they can write off on their taxes.," 16 Oct. 2018 To help make sense of this upsetting news, here are all of the signs that predicted the end of Ari and Pete's engagement: 1. Carolyn Twersky, Seventeen, "8 Hidden Signs That Predicted Pete Davidson and Ariana Grande’s Breakup," 15 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'predict.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of predict

1590, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for predict

Latin praedictus, past participle of praedicere, from prae- pre- + dicere to say — more at diction

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Statistics for predict

Last Updated

9 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for predict

The first known use of predict was in 1590

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More Definitions for predict

predict

verb

English Language Learners Definition of predict

: to say that (something) will or might happen in the future

predict

verb
pre·​dict | \ pri-ˈdikt \
predicted; predicting

Kids Definition of predict

: to say that (something) will or might happen in the future predict the weather

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More from Merriam-Webster on predict

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with predict

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for predict

Spanish Central: Translation of predict

Nglish: Translation of predict for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of predict for Arabic Speakers

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