persistent

adjective
per·​sis·​tent | \ pər-ˈsi-stənt How to pronounce persistent (audio) , -ˈzi- \

Definition of persistent

1 : existing for a long or longer than usual time or continuously: such as
a : retained beyond the usual period a persistent leaf
b : continuing without change in function or structure persistent gills
c : effective in the open for an appreciable time usually through slow volatilizing mustard gas is persistent
d : degraded only slowly by the environment persistent pesticides
e : remaining infectious for a relatively long time in a vector after an initial period of incubation persistent viruses
2a : continuing or inclined to persist in a course
b : continuing to exist despite interference or treatment a persistent cough has been in a persistent vegetative state for two years

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Other Words from persistent

persistently adverb

Examples of persistent in a Sentence

Contrary to persistent myth, Hoover was an activist. — Steve Forbes, Forbes, 30 June 2008 The high-water mark of such truckling might be the publication of the Cato Institute report "America's Record Trade Deficit: A Symbol of Strength." Freedom had become slavery; persistent deficits had become economic power. — Eric Janszen, Harper's, February 2008 The silence started from your end just about the time you said good-bye to dear St. Elizabeth and it has been constant and persistent ever since. — Archibald Macleish, letter, 11 July 1959 We were nagged by a persistent salesman. He is one of the government's most persistent critics. She has been persistent in pursuing the job. He has been fighting a persistent cold. Flooding has been a persistent problem in the area this year. Persistent rumors that the business is for sale have alarmed the staff.
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Recent Examples on the Web The offer also highlighted the deep and persistent divisions among Republicans — most of whom have balked at a large new federal infusion of pandemic aid — that have complicated the negotiations for months. Emily Cochrane And Alan Rappeport New York Times, Star Tribune, "Days after calling off talks, Trump increases stimulus offer to $1.8 trillion," 9 Oct. 2020 The offer also highlighted the deep and persistent divisions among Republicans — most of whom have balked at a large new federal infusion of pandemic aid — that have complicated the negotiations for months. Alan Rappeport, New York Times, "Trump Raises Stimulus Offer to $1.8 Trillion Days After Halting Negotiations," 9 Oct. 2020 That likely means that heat exposure—which is intensifying in step with global warming—will have a more direct and persistent impact on economic growth and development than previously anticipated. Avery Ellfeldt, Scientific American, "Rising Temperatures Undermine Academic Success and Equity," 6 Oct. 2020 Bronfman used her seemingly endless well of money to fund aggressive and persistent lawsuits against ex-members and critics. Washington Post, "Seagram’s heiress Clare Bronfman sentenced to almost seven years in prison in NXIVM sex trafficking case," 1 Oct. 2020 Seidler and Fowler, patient and persistent once more. Bryce Miller Columnist, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Column: Bold Padres owners Peter Seidler, Ron Fowler savor playoff return," 29 Sep. 2020 Some doctors estimate as many as 10% of those infected will experience persistent or recurring issues. Erin Allday, SFChronicle.com, "Another scary thing about COVID: Survivors aren’t fully recovering," 28 Sep. 2020 Part of getting past rejection is being persistent and patient. Terry Pluto, cleveland, "I know it, I’ll be hurt again! The battle with rejection – Terry Pluto’s Faith & You," 25 Sep. 2020 The change from a historical average of between 90 and 90.5 beats per minute to more than 92 beats per minute is a significant and persistent change. Jason Kahn, STAT, "Kids’ heart rates are rising as the pandemic drags on," 25 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'persistent.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of persistent

1826, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for persistent

Latin persistent-, persistens, present participle of persistere — see persist

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Time Traveler for persistent

Time Traveler

The first known use of persistent was in 1826

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Statistics for persistent

Last Updated

17 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Persistent.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/persistent. Accessed 21 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for persistent

persistent

adjective
How to pronounce persistent (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of persistent

: continuing to do something or to try to do something even though it is difficult or other people want you to stop
: continuing beyond the usual, expected, or normal time : not stopping or going away

persistent

adjective
per·​sist·​ent | \ pər-ˈsi-stənt How to pronounce persistent (audio) \

Kids Definition of persistent

: continuing to act or exist longer than usual a persistent cold

Other Words from persistent

persistently adverb

persistent

adjective
per·​sis·​tent | \ -tənt How to pronounce persistent (audio) \

Medical Definition of persistent

1 : existing or continuing for a long time: as
a : effective in the open for an appreciable time usually through slow volatilizing mustard gas is persistent
b : degraded only slowly by the environment persistent pesticides
c : remaining infectious for a relatively long time in a vector after an initial period of incubation persistent viruses
2 : continuing to exist despite interference or treatment a persistent cough has been in a persistent vegetative state for two years

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Comments on persistent

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