orange

1 of 3

noun

or·​ange ˈär-inj How to pronounce orange (audio)
ˈär(-ə)nj;
chiefly Northern & Midland
ˈȯr-inj How to pronounce orange (audio)
ˈȯr(-ə)nj
1
a
: a globose berry with a yellowish to reddish-orange rind and a sweet edible pulp
He peeled an orange.
b
: any of various small evergreen citrus trees (genus Citrus) with glossy ovate leaves, hard yellow wood, fragrant white flowers, and fruits that are oranges
2
: any of several trees or fruits resembling the orange
3
: any of a group of colors that are between red and yellow in hue
Orange is about midway between red and yellow in hue.

orange

2 of 3

adjective (1)

1
: of or relating to the orange
2
: of the color orange

Orange

3 of 3

adjective (2)

: of, relating to, or sympathizing with Orangemen
Orangeism
ˈär-in-ˌji-zəm
ˈär(ə-)n-
ˈȯr-in- How to pronounce Orange (audio)
ˈȯr(ə-)n-
noun

Examples of orange in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
The venue is popular for civil weddings and is where Queen Anne originally built a garden space to winter her orange trees in 1704. Rebecca Aizin, Peoplemag, 8 Feb. 2024 But for all their similarities, from a legal standpoint the two cases are apples and oranges—and Cook was always going to stand a better chance of holding on to his paycheck. Dylan Sloan, Fortune, 8 Feb. 2024 In one typical untitled painting from 1968, a bulbous white form pauses in front of large blocks of yellow, reddish orange and lavender. Will Heinrich, New York Times, 6 Feb. 2024 This version uses thick baguette slices to soak up a custard flavored with cinnamon and orange. Lisa Cericola, Southern Living, 5 Feb. 2024 Whole oranges contain ample amounts of fiber and water—two elements known to alleviate constipation. Sarah Garone, Health, 31 Jan. 2024 Strain over a large-format ice cube and garnish with orange. Jeff Burkhart, The Mercury News, 31 Jan. 2024 While furniture and walls can be in neutral tones, accessorizing with pillows, linens and draperies that mimic coral oranges and sea-glass blues makes a seaside statement. Charlotte Observer, 31 Jan. 2024 Squibb’s robust orange tabby, Billy Bob, wandered by and rubbed against her shin. Naomi Fry, The New Yorker, 29 Jan. 2024
Adjective
The Gatorade was orange when Kansas City beat the San Francisco 49ers in the 2020 Super Bowl. Ty Roush, Forbes, 10 Feb. 2024 Garnish with orange slices. Add Some Spirits For a boozy version, add 12 ounces vodka or gin. Ivy Odom, Southern Living, 5 Feb. 2024 Regarding the home’s colorful interiors, which feature a glossy orange and green kitchen, blue Case Study-style daybeds and an Eames lounge chair in a custom orange fabric, Agle wanted to fight neutral trends like cream-colored boucle. Lisa Boone, Los Angeles Times, 5 Feb. 2024 Make the toppers by dipping orange wedges or gummy orange candies in dark chocolate. Sarah Martens, Better Homes & Gardens, 31 Jan. 2024 Wearing a black first baseman Logan Morrison T-shirt, orange baseball cap speckled with collectable pins, Marlins logo stylized sunglasses, nickel-sized Marlins logo earrings, homemade bracelets and with a matching orange Marlins phone case slung across her chest, Amador is a beacon of baseball. Chabeli Herrera, Miami Herald, 30 Jan. 2024 The orange liquid landed on the painting’s bulletproof glass casing, and the Renaissance masterpiece suffered no damage. Sonja Anderson, Smithsonian Magazine, 29 Jan. 2024 And, despite the statement gown, Kardashian went all-out with her neckwear for the Margiela show, pairing the dress with an ornate, high-neck choker speckled with green, white and orange stones. Bailey Richards, Peoplemag, 28 Jan. 2024 One exception is the baby blue shirt with orange check in Bunting and Light, which is based on an old Ben Sherman design worn by his father. Simon Chilvers, Vogue, 26 Jan. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'orange.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun and Adjective (1)

Middle English, from Anglo-French orrange, araunge, from Old Occitan auranja, from Arabic nāranj, from Persian nārang, from Sanskrit nāraṅga orange tree

First Known Use

Noun

1532, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Adjective (1)

1542, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective (2)

1795, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of orange was in 1532

Dictionary Entries Near orange

Cite this Entry

“Orange.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/orange. Accessed 23 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

orange

1 of 2 noun
or·​ange ˈär-inj How to pronounce orange (audio) ˈȯr- How to pronounce orange (audio)
-ənj
1
a
: a round usually sweet juicy fruit with a yellowish to reddish orange rind
b
: any of various small evergreen citrus trees having shiny leaves, fragrant white flowers, and fruits which are oranges
2
: a color between red and yellow

orange

2 of 2 adjective
1
: of or relating to the orange
2
: of the color orange

Medical Definition

orange

noun
or·​ange ˈär-inj How to pronounce orange (audio) ˈȯr- How to pronounce orange (audio)
1
a
: a globose berry with a yellowish to reddish orange rind and a sweet edible pulp
b
: any of various rather small evergreen trees (genus Citrus) with ovate leaves, hard yellow wood, fragrant white flowers, and fruits that are oranges
2
often capitalized : agent orange

Geographical Definition

Orange 1 of 2

geographical name (1)

Or·​ange ˈär-inj How to pronounce Orange (audio)
ˈär(-ə)nj,
ˈȯr-inj,
ˈȯr(-ə)nj
1
city in southwestern California north of Santa Ana population 136,416
2
river 1300 miles (2092 kilometers) long in southern Africa flowing from the Drakensberg Mountains in Lesotho west into the Atlantic Ocean

Orange

2 of 2

geographical name (2)

city in southeastern France north of Avignon population 29,135

More from Merriam-Webster on orange

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