obstinate

adjective
ob·​sti·​nate | \ˈäb-stə-nət \

Definition of obstinate 

1 : stubbornly adhering to an opinion, purpose, or course in spite of reason, arguments, or persuasion obstinate resistance to change

2 : not easily subdued, remedied, or removed obstinate fever

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from obstinate

obstinately adverb
obstinateness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for obstinate

obstinate, dogged, stubborn, pertinacious, mulish mean fixed and unyielding in course or purpose. obstinate implies usually an unreasonable persistence. an obstinate proponent of conspiracy theories dogged suggests an admirable often tenacious and unwavering persistence. pursued the story with dogged perseverance stubborn implies sturdiness in resisting change which may or may not be admirable. a person too stubborn to admit error pertinacious suggests an annoying or irksome persistence. a pertinacious salesclerk refusing to take no for an answer mulish implies a thoroughly unreasonable obstinacy. a mulish determination to have his own way

Examples of obstinate in a Sentence

More than 30 cities had sued the gun industry for the costs of violence on their streets. Cuomo had brashly stepped into the legal swamp, hoping he could be the guy to force concessions from an obstinate industry. — Matt Bai, Newsweek, 5 Feb. 2001 With The New York Times calling Klein "a weak nominee" and editorializing that the administration should withdraw him, and with his opponents obstinate and apparently committed, he seemed for a moment to be in serious trouble. — John Heilemann, Wired, November 2000 What did they know of life? All they knew was how to parrot the stock phrases of their profession and to continue to be obstinate until somebody, somewhere, paid up. — Alexander McCall Smith, The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, 1998 When my father finished telling the story, he looked at me, then looked away. A moment of silence lodged between us, an old and obstinate silence. — Bernard Cooper, Harper's, August 1992 his obstinate refusal to obey My parents remain as obstinate as ever.
See More

Recent Examples on the Web

Amazingly, managing the end of the Cold War and the international coalition that forced Saddam out of Kuwait had turned out to be less soul-sapping than trying to negotiate, over and over, with the obstinate right wing of his own party. Neil Swidey, BostonGlobe.com, "How Democrats would be better off if Bill Clinton had never been president," 10 July 2018 As two tiny eyes peer out from beneath the shell, short tentacles tickle the air, revealing a certain obstinate charm. Degen Pener, Los Angeles Magazine, "What’s Being Done to Revive L.A.’s Decimated Abalone Population," 22 June 2018 Ever obstinate nearly two centuries after his death, Beethoven still won’t roll over. Mark Swed, latimes.com, "Beethoven rolls over at the Ojai Music Festival," 8 June 2018 Her life, shuttling between two obstinate men, starts to seem unsustainable. Rachel Syme, The New Republic, ""Billions" reckons with the inflated egos and muddled ethics of Wall Street.," 24 Apr. 2018 Especially obstinate bottles mean plumbers have to remove the entire toilet. The case has been passed off to the Sheboygan County District Attorney's Office for charges to be filed, WBAY reports. Jared Gilmour, miamiherald, "Serial toilet clogger cost city thousands. But a tip just flushed him out, police say," 30 May 2018 One irritating or obstinate writer can bring the entire machinery of a show to a halt. Mike Reiss, WSJ, "How to Succeed Like ‘The Simpsons’," 25 May 2018 The process went smoothly until an obstinate 19th-century steamer trunk refused to open and reveal its insides. Domenica Bongiovanni, Indianapolis Star, "Don't miss your flight looking at this cool vintage luggage at the Indianapolis Airport," 22 May 2018 As Nunes sees it, the cycle of confrontation is part of a legitimate effort by him and other House Republicans to conduct oversight of obstinate law enforcement officials. BostonGlobe.com, "Amid a swirl of investigations, Devin Nunes takes on the Justice Department," 12 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'obstinate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of obstinate

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for obstinate

Middle English, from Anglo-French obstinat, Latin obstinatus, past participle of obstinare to be resolved, from ob- in the way + -stinare (akin to stare to stand)

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about obstinate

Listen to Our Podcast about obstinate

Statistics for obstinate

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for obstinate

The first known use of obstinate was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for obstinate

obstinate

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of obstinate

: refusing to change your behavior or your ideas

: difficult to deal with, remove, etc.

obstinate

adjective
ob·​sti·​nate | \ˈäb-stə-nət \

Kids Definition of obstinate

1 : sticking stubbornly to an opinion or purpose

2 : difficult to deal with or get rid of an obstinate fever

Other Words from obstinate

obstinately adverb

obstinate

adjective
ob·​sti·​nate | \ˈäb-stə-nət \

Medical Definition of obstinate 

1 : adhering to an opinion, purpose, or course in spite of reason, arguments, or persuasion

2 : not easily subdued, remedied, or removed obstinate fever

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on obstinate

What made you want to look up obstinate? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

living or existing for a long time

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

Late Autumn 2018 Words of the Day Quiz

  • frosted-autumn-leaves
  • Which is a synonym of yahoo?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Word Winder's CrossWinder

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!