new blood

noun

Definition of new blood

: persons who are accepted into a group or organization and are expected to provide fresh ideas and vitality : fresh blood … the social exclusivity common in this class in the early part of the century, which served to limit new blood and ideas…— Anne H. Soukhanov

Examples of new blood in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Some significant brand names have disappeared from our shopping malls forever, while others will be led by new blood yet face challenges to compete in the new world ahead. Matt Rubel, WSJ, "For the Retail Industry, 2020 Was a Wild Ride," 15 Dec. 2020 Similar trade-offs apply to the new blood oxygen sensor, and in fact to the entire philosophical underpinnings of Apple’s approach to pervasive non-stop self-surveillance. Alex Hutchinson, Outside Online, "First Look: Apple’s New Fitness+ Streaming Workouts," 14 Dec. 2020 All the while, as members of the opposition are picked off one-by-one, the likelihood of them being replaced by new blood is shrinking, as the spaces for cultivating new talent shrink and the cost of getting involved in politics rises ever higher. James Griffiths, CNN, "With arrests and a security law, who is left to fight for democracy in Hong Kong?," 3 Dec. 2020 By continually bringing in new blood — exchanging its blood — the show has managed to stay current through the years. Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times, "Review: ‘Saturday Night Live’ brings back host Dave Chappelle to bookend four years of Trump," 8 Nov. 2020 Is that necessarily where the Clippers end their search for new blood in the backcourt, however? Andrew Greif, Los Angeles Times, "Five questions for the Clippers entering free agency," 19 Nov. 2020 The big infusion of new blood among decisionmakers at the region’s biggest governments is due to term limits and some council members running for higher office. Michael Smolens Columnist, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Column: It has been an election of change — and more may be coming," 3 Nov. 2020 So, this election is guaranteed to bring new blood to the City Council. Gustavo Solis, San Diego Union-Tribune, "2020 election: two City Council seats up for grabs in Imperial Beach," 7 Oct. 2020 The rest of the afternoon inspired the thought that maybe the holdover Astros and the new blood might get something cooking into October. Gabe Lacques, USA TODAY, "Haters gonna wait: Astros are back and getting 'loud' after beating Twins in Game 1," 29 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'new blood.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of new blood

1824, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for new blood

Time Traveler

The first known use of new blood was in 1824

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Statistics for new blood

Last Updated

27 Dec 2020

Cite this Entry

“New blood.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/new%20blood. Accessed 24 Jan. 2021.

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