myth

noun
\ ˈmith How to pronounce myth (audio) \

Definition of myth

1a : a usually traditional story of ostensibly historical events that serves to unfold part of the world view of a people or explain a practice, belief, or natural phenomenon creation myths
b : parable, allegory Moral responsibility is the motif of Plato's myths.
2a : a popular belief or tradition that has grown up around something or someone especially : one embodying the ideals and institutions of a society or segment of society seduced by the American myth of individualism — Orde Coombs the utopian myth of a perfect society
b : an unfounded or false notion the myth of racial superiority
3 : a person or thing having only an imaginary or unverifiable existence the Superman myth The unicorn is a myth.
4 : the whole body of myths a student of Greek myth

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Synonyms for myth

Synonyms

fable, legend, mythos

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Myth and Urban Myth

For a word so often applied to events or stories from long, long ago, myth has a remarkably recent history in the English language. The earliest evidence for the word is from 1830, well after the time when the events themselves are thought to have occurred (though it should be noted that the related words mythology and mythic are hundreds of years older – still not as old as Achilles, but not young, either!). One application of myth, however – in the phrase urban myth – is quite new. Curiously, an urban myth does not usually have anything to do with the city: it is simply “a story about an unusual event or occurrence that many people believe is true but that is not true.” An example would be the tale that Elvis Presley is still alive after spending decades in a witness protection program. The phrase urban myth has been used to describe such hoaxes since at least 1971.

Examples of myth in a Sentence

It's an enduring myth that money brings happiness. I don't believe the myths and legends about this forest. Contrary to popular myth, no monster lives in this lake.
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Recent Examples on the Web

The idea that sugar is bad and addictive is arguably the queen of all diet myths these days. Jaclyn London, Ms, Rd, Cdn, Good Housekeeping, "Is Sugar Bad for You? Here's What You Need to Know," 26 Mar. 2019 This myth that Drake is less reckless and more chivalrous than rappers like, say, Future, needs to be debunked. refinery29.com, "Can We Finally Admit Drake Isn't The "Good Guy" We Thought He Was?," 29 June 2018 Mr Carreyrou recounts this creation myth without comment. The Economist, "The rise and fall of Elizabeth Holmes, Silicon Valley’s startup queen," 31 May 2018 As anti-Semitism sentiment surges again in Europe and the U.S., echoes of this myth can be seen in similar ideas about Jewish financier George Soros, who right-wing extremists often cast as a puppetmaster-type villain. Benjamin Hart, Daily Intelligencer, "D.C. Councilman Apologizes for Claiming That Jews Control the Weather," 19 Mar. 2018 There’s this tired myth that black and brown faces don’t sell overseas. Gary Thompson, Philly.com, "Tessa Thompson: What to expect from 'Creed II,' and why 'Black Panther' is the movie we need now," 15 Feb. 2018 And those kunzites, evening stones by myth, but shining brightly under the light today. Stellene Volandes, Town & Country, "How to See the Next Jewelry Masterpiece," 14 Mar. 2019 But the notion that he was elected by gritty blue collar people who were unlike typical Republicans is a myth. Jennifer Wright, Harper's BAZAAR, "What Will Actually Happen to Trump?," 19 Dec. 2018 But his determination not to show the physical signs of his polio to the public remains famous decades later, even though the idea that the public didn’t know about his disability is a myth. Gabby Raymond, Time, "Why Newly Discovered Video Footage of Franklin D. Roosevelt Walking Is a Big Deal," 28 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'myth.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of myth

1830, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for myth

earlier mythos, mythus, borrowed from Greek mŷthos "utterance, speech, discourse, tale, narrative, fiction, legend," of obscure origin

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Learn More about myth

Dictionary Entries near myth

mystifiedly

mystify

mystique

myth

mythi

mythical

mythicalness

Statistics for myth

Last Updated

19 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for myth

The first known use of myth was in 1830

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More Definitions for myth

myth

noun

English Language Learners Definition of myth

: an idea or story that is believed by many people but that is not true
: a story that was told in an ancient culture to explain a practice, belief, or natural occurrence
: such stories as a group

myth

noun
\ ˈmith How to pronounce myth (audio) \

Kids Definition of myth

1 : a story often describing the adventures of beings with more than human powers that attempts to explain mysterious events (as the changing of the seasons) or that explains a religious belief or practice
2 : such stories as a group
3 : a person or thing existing only in the imagination The dragon is a myth.
4 : a popular belief that is not true It's just a myth that money can buy happiness.

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More from Merriam-Webster on myth

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with myth

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for myth

Spanish Central: Translation of myth

Nglish: Translation of myth for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of myth for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about myth

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