mythical

adjective
myth·​i·​cal | \ ˈmi-thi-kəl \
variants: or mythic \ -​thik \

Definition of mythical 

1 : based on or described in a myth especially as contrasted with history
2 usually mythical : existing only in the imagination : fictitious, imaginary constructed a mythical all-star team
3 usually mythic : having qualities suitable to myth : legendary the twilight of a mythic professional career— Clayton Riley

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Other Words from mythical

mythically \ -​thi-​k(ə-​)lē \ adverb

Synonyms for mythical

Synonyms

fabled, fabulous, legendary

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Choose the Right Synonym for mythical

fictitious, fabulous, legendary, mythical, apocryphal mean having the nature of something imagined or invented. fictitious implies fabrication and suggests artificiality or contrivance more than deliberate falsification or deception. fictitious characters fabulous stresses the marvelous or incredible character of something without necessarily implying impossibility or actual nonexistence. a land of fabulous riches legendary suggests the elaboration of invented details and distortion of historical facts produced by popular tradition. the legendary exploits of Davy Crockett mythical implies a purely fanciful explanation of facts or the creation of beings and events out of the imagination. mythical creatures apocryphal implies an unknown or dubious source or origin or may imply that the thing itself is dubious or inaccurate. a book that repeats many apocryphal stories

Examples of mythical in a Sentence

Hercules was a mythical hero who was half man and half god. gods fighting in a mythical battle in the sky The sportswriters picked a mythical all-star team. The benefits of the new policy proved to be mythical.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Jamal Murray, Jonas Valanciunas and Boban Marjanovic would be snubbed on this 12-man mythical roster. Tim Reynolds, The Seattle Times, "On Basketball: International stars leaving mark on NBA," 2 Jan. 2019 Most in the media live in or near large, progressive cities, have college degrees, empathize with the left and embrace a mythical divide that puts themselves on the right (left) side of history. WSJ, "‘Divided America’ Myth Strokes Elite Egos," 1 Jan. 2019 So much for the mythical notion of perfectly behaved Japanese children and serene Japanese parenting. Joe Morgenstern, WSJ, "‘Mirai’ Review: On the Cutting Edge of Cute," 29 Nov. 2018 Nina Simone once described freedom as the absence of fear, and as with all humans, the attempt of black Americans to picture a homeland, whether real or mythical, was an attempt to picture a place where there was no fear. Carvell Wallace, New York Times, "Why ‘Black Panther’ Is a Defining Moment for Black America," 12 Feb. 2018 That esoteric and fantastically complex cosmology, with its hundreds of bodhisatvas, demons, gods, and mythical beasts, and its unique theories of consciousness and death, has been all but crushed in Tibet by the Chinese state. Lawrence Osborne, Town & Country, "Why Everyone Is Traveling to Bhutan," 30 Mar. 2015 But given that statistics note that trans people attacking people in bathrooms is so unlikely as to qualify as mythical, that is amazingly low on my list of concerns. Jennifer Wright, Harper's BAZAAR, "Transgender Women Are Women. Transgender Men Are Men.," 23 Oct. 2018 The mythical half-human, half-fish hybrid may not exist in real life, but these Halloween decorations look scary-realistic. Taysha Murtaugh, Country Living, "Mermaid Skeletons Are Here to Make a Splash This Halloween," 10 Oct. 2018 Perhaps the timing of Ditte and Nicolaj’s Ganni in the late aughts, ushering in a fresh interpretation of Scandinavian style, aligned well with our collective tiring of these mythical style icons. Alexandra Ilyashov, Glamour, "How Ganni Came to Dictate Everything You Want to Wear Right Now," 10 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'mythical.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of mythical

1610, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for mythical

mythical, from Late Latin mȳthicus "of myth, legendary" (borrowed from Greek mȳthikós, from mŷthos "utterance, tale, myth" + -ikos -ic entry 1) + -al entry 1; mythic, borrowed from Late Latin mȳthicus

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Dictionary Entries near mythical

mystique

myth

mythi

mythical

mythicalness

mythicist

mythicize

Statistics for mythical

Last Updated

14 Jan 2019

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Time Traveler for mythical

The first known use of mythical was in 1610

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More Definitions for mythical

mythical

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of mythical

: based on or described in a myth

: existing only in the imagination

mythical

adjective
myth·​i·​cal | \ ˈmi-thi-kəl \

Kids Definition of mythical

1 : based on or told of in a myth a mythical hero
2 : imaginary a mythical town

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More from Merriam-Webster on mythical

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for mythical

Spanish Central: Translation of mythical

Nglish: Translation of mythical for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of mythical for Arabic Speakers

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