mundane

adjective
mun·​dane | \ ˌmən-ˈdān How to pronounce mundane (audio) , ˈmən-ˌdān \

Definition of mundane

1 : of, relating to, or characteristic of the world
2 : characterized by the practical, transitory, and ordinary : commonplace the mundane concerns of day-to-day life

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Other Words from mundane

mundanely adverb
mundaneness \ ˌmən-​ˈdān-​nəs How to pronounce mundaneness (audio) , ˈmən-​ˌdān-​ \ noun
mundanity \ ˌmən-​ˈdā-​nə-​tē How to pronounce mundanity (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for mundane

earthly, worldly, mundane mean belonging to or characteristic of the earth. earthly often implies a contrast with what is heavenly or spiritual. abandoned earthly concerns and entered a convent worldly and mundane both imply a relation to the immediate concerns and activities of human beings, worldly suggesting tangible personal gain or gratification worldly goods and mundane suggesting reference to the immediate and practical. a mundane discussion of finances

Examples of mundane in a Sentence

On him, a mundane navy blazer looked like an Armani dinner jacket; around him, a dusky locker room became the chandeliered lobby of the Savoy. — Curry Kirkpatrick, ESPN, 19 Mar. 2001 How did our ancestors pass from the mundane activity of counting to the concept of 'number' in the abstract, devoid of any particular collection of objects to label? — John D. Barrow, Pi in the Sky, 1992 They decided on buttock tattoos, rather than the more mundane engagement ring, because a tattoo is permanent. You can always pawn a ring. — Mike Royko, Chicago Tribune, 25 Aug. 1988 The day began with the mundane business of getting my white chiffon dress shortened … — Lady Bird Johnson, January 14, 1964, in A White House Diary1970 mundane chores, like washing dishes They lead a pretty mundane life. prayer and meditation helped her put her mundane worries aside
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Recent Examples on the Web Knowing that life and death hang in the balance of seemingly mundane choices is a heavy weight to bear. Julie Beck, The Atlantic, "Just Because You Can Doesn’t Mean You Should," 30 June 2020 Batting practice and such will no longer be mundane but especially meaningful. Robert Avery, Houston Chronicle, "Aside from some discomfort, Acosta all but recovered from serious hand injury," 30 June 2020 Still, thousands of them continued to fly back and forth between the U.S. and their home countries, for weddings or funerals—or for work assignments or to get mundane paperwork taken care of. Olivia Carville, Bloomberg.com, "Thousands Stranded, Families Separated After Trump H-1B Decree," 30 June 2020 Her vivid descriptions make even mundane settings come alive, including the bustle of a competent wait staff during a busy restaurant dinner shift. Joan Gaylord, The Christian Science Monitor, "‘How is your novel going?’ A young woman writer’s struggle.," 29 June 2020 For now, the components that the AI is tasked with making are pretty mundane. Daniel Oberhaus, Wired, "NASA’s New Moon-Bound Space Suits Will Get a Boost From AI," 29 June 2020 However, the museum became aware that human remains may be lurking among more mundane items tucked away in their archaeological archives. Debra Utacia Krol, The Arizona Republic, "Tribes' human remains and cultural items have been scattered across the U.S. Here's how they get returned," 27 June 2020 Or the explanation could be more mundane: the xenon could merely be contaminated with tritium—a heavier form of hydrogen whose natural radiation could have muddied the signal seen at XENON1T. Dan Falk, Scientific American, "Is Dark Matter Made of Axions?," 23 June 2020 But the county was not equipped to process a large number of payments quickly, and allocation was slowed from issues as mundane as emails being sent to spam and applicants incorrectly filling out parts of their application. Adrienne Roberts, Detroit Free Press, "Millions in grants is available for small businesses. But time is running out.," 22 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'mundane.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of mundane

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for mundane

Middle English mondeyne, from Anglo-French mundain, from Late Latin mundanus, from Latin mundus world

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Time Traveler for mundane

Time Traveler

The first known use of mundane was in the 15th century

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Statistics for mundane

Last Updated

5 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Mundane.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mundane. Accessed 9 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for mundane

mundane

adjective
How to pronounce mundane (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of mundane

: dull and ordinary
: relating to ordinary life on earth rather than to spiritual things

mundane

adjective
mun·​dane | \ ˌmən-ˈdān, ˈmən-ˌdān \

Kids Definition of mundane

1 : dull and ordinary I helped with mundane tasks, like doing dishes.
2 : relating to ordinary life on earth rather than spiritual things

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More from Merriam-Webster on mundane

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for mundane

Spanish Central: Translation of mundane

Nglish: Translation of mundane for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of mundane for Arabic Speakers

Comments on mundane

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