moving

adjective
mov·​ing | \ ˈmü-viŋ How to pronounce moving (audio) \

Definition of moving

1a : marked by or capable of movement
b : of or relating to a change of residence moving expenses
c : used for transferring furnishings from one residence to another a moving van
d : involving a motor vehicle that is in motion a moving violation
2a : producing or transferring motion or action
b : stirring deeply in a way that evokes a strong emotional response a moving story of a faithful dog

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Other Words from moving

movingly \ ˈmü-​viŋ-​lē How to pronounce moving (audio) \ adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for moving

moving, impressive, poignant, affecting, touching, pathetic mean having the power to produce deep emotion. moving may apply to any strong emotional effect including thrilling, agitating, saddening, or calling forth pity or sympathy. a moving appeal for contributions impressive implies compelling attention, admiration, wonder, or conviction. an impressive list of achievements poignant applies to what keenly or sharply affects one's sensitivities. a poignant documentary on the homeless affecting is close to moving but most often suggests pathos. an affecting deathbed reunion touching implies arousing tenderness or compassion. the touching innocence in a child's eyes pathetic implies moving to pity or sometimes contempt. pathetic attempts to justify misconduct

Examples of moving in a Sentence

a moving story of a faithful dog He gave a moving speech at the memorial service.
Recent Examples on the Web The profile for the ideal head coach, though, is a moving target. Jarrett Bell, USA Today, "Eric Bieniemy is ready to be a head coach. Which NFL team will finally take him?," 30 Dec. 2020 And the Water Train is still a moving target for vigilantes and eco-warriors. Malcom Forbes, Star Tribune, "Review: 'Stillicide,' by Cynan Jones," 28 Dec. 2020 This is a moving target that will be dictated by numerous variables. Eliott C. Mclaughlin, CNN, "When can YOU get the vaccine? It depends on your health, occupation and where you live," 22 Dec. 2020 The forecast was this storm was very challenging as the rain-snow line was a moving target. Washington Post, "Here’s how much snow and ice fell in D.C. region from Wednesday’s winter storm," 17 Dec. 2020 Decisions whether to open or close schools, like so much else during the pandemic, are a moving target. Lenora Chu, The Christian Science Monitor, "Bars or schools? How nations rank education in pandemic priorities.," 3 Dec. 2020 The eight-minute applause track contains surely the longest, and most moving, cast scroll, with the names of all 1,400 performers. Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times, "Miss the ecstasy and extravagance of Mahler’s Eighth? You’re not alone," 28 Oct. 2020 As this year has proved, the agency’s financial plan is a moving target. Justin George, Washington Post, "Metro budget cuts weekend service, half of bus routes and closes 19 stations amid dire financial forecast," 1 Dec. 2020 The act can be applied to regulations finalized 60 legislative days before a congressional session ends, which can be a moving target. Jay Heflin, Washington Examiner, "Trump deregulatory efforts at stake in Georgia runoff," 24 Nov. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'moving.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of moving

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

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Time Traveler for moving

Time Traveler

The first known use of moving was in the 14th century

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Statistics for moving

Last Updated

8 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Moving.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/moving. Accessed 17 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for moving

moving

adjective
How to pronounce moving (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of moving

: changing place or position
: having a strong emotional effect : causing feelings of sadness or sympathy
: relating to the activity or process of moving to a different place to live or work

moving

adjective
mov·​ing | \ ˈmü-viŋ \

Kids Definition of moving

1 : changing place or position a moving target
2 : causing feelings of sadness or sympathy a moving story
3 : used for transporting belongings from one place to another a moving van

Other Words from moving

movingly adverb spoke movingly

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Comments on moving

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