moving

adjective
mov·​ing | \ ˈmü-viŋ How to pronounce moving (audio) \

Definition of moving

1a : marked by or capable of movement
b : of or relating to a change of residence moving expenses
c : used for transferring furnishings from one residence to another a moving van
d : involving a motor vehicle that is in motion a moving violation
2a : producing or transferring motion or action
b : stirring deeply in a way that evokes a strong emotional response a moving story of a faithful dog

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Other Words from moving

movingly \ ˈmü-​viŋ-​lē How to pronounce movingly (audio) \ adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for moving

moving, impressive, poignant, affecting, touching, pathetic mean having the power to produce deep emotion. moving may apply to any strong emotional effect including thrilling, agitating, saddening, or calling forth pity or sympathy. a moving appeal for contributions impressive implies compelling attention, admiration, wonder, or conviction. an impressive list of achievements poignant applies to what keenly or sharply affects one's sensitivities. a poignant documentary on the homeless affecting is close to moving but most often suggests pathos. an affecting deathbed reunion touching implies arousing tenderness or compassion. the touching innocence in a child's eyes pathetic implies moving to pity or sometimes contempt. pathetic attempts to justify misconduct

Examples of moving in a Sentence

a moving story of a faithful dog He gave a moving speech at the memorial service.

Recent Examples on the Web

One of the most moving moments of the video came around the four-minute mark when a choked-up Candace decided to address her fellow cast members. Kayla Keegan, Good Housekeeping, "'Fuller House' Star Candace Cameron Bure Gets Emotional at First Reading Sans Lori Loughlin," 24 May 2019 Yet some of his most moving stories were about the kind of regular people who only read about luxuries such as the Concorde. Danica Kirka, Fox News, "Veteran AP reporter, editor Robert Barr dies at age 71," 31 Aug. 2018 And so buoy 46410 and all that moving water got shared — in text messages, phone calls and on social media. Zaz Hollander, Anchorage Daily News, "The case of the phantom tsunami: Why an Alaska buoy showed a big wave that wasn’t there.," 25 Jan. 2018 Here are the biggest moments from a truly moving hour of television. Mehera Bonner, Harper's BAZAAR, "Roger Finally Redeemed Himself on Outlander," 21 Jan. 2019 Netflix's Tidying Up with Marie Kondo may have ridiculously banal content—watching people clean out their closets and drawers—but the emotional toll of letting go is a surprisingly moving experience. Lonnie Firestone, Glamour, "It Took a Fire in My Building to Understand Marie Kondo's Method," 15 Jan. 2019 Clearly moved by the story, Harry popped the letter in his jacket pocket and offered up some moving words of comfort and affirmation to Otia. Lucy Wood, Marie Claire, "Prince Harry Had Some Touching Advice For a 6-Year-Old Boy Who Lost His Mother," 31 Oct. 2018 Written and directed by Debra Granik (Winter’s Bone), Leave No Trace is an often surprising and very moving film about familial love. Alissa Wilkinson, Vox, "A dozen streamable shows and movies that kids can watch (and parents will like)," 24 Dec. 2018 The moving photo shows Wade sitting down while Union, standing, leans down to kiss his head. Sarah Jacoby, SELF, "Gabrielle Union on What It’s Like to Have a Baby After Multiple Miscarriages," 3 Dec. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'moving.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of moving

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

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Statistics for moving

Last Updated

3 Jun 2019

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Time Traveler for moving

The first known use of moving was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for moving

moving

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of moving

: changing place or position
: having a strong emotional effect : causing feelings of sadness or sympathy
: relating to the activity or process of moving to a different place to live or work

moving

adjective
mov·​ing | \ ˈmü-viŋ\

Kids Definition of moving

1 : changing place or position a moving target
2 : causing feelings of sadness or sympathy a moving story
3 : used for transporting belongings from one place to another a moving van

Other Words from moving

movingly adverb spoke movingly

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More from Merriam-Webster on moving

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for moving

Spanish Central: Translation of moving

Nglish: Translation of moving for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of moving for Arabic Speakers

Comments on moving

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