mislead

verb
mis·​lead | \ ˌmis-ˈlēd \
misled\ -​ˈled \; misleading

Definition of mislead

transitive verb

: to lead in a wrong direction or into a mistaken action or belief often by deliberate deceit His comments were a deliberate attempt to mislead the public.

intransitive verb

: to lead astray : give a wrong impression exciting as they are, they mislead— E. M. Forster

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Other Words from mislead

misleader noun
misleadingly \ -​ˈlē-​diŋ-​lē \ adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for mislead

deceive, mislead, delude, beguile mean to lead astray or frustrate usually by underhandedness. deceive implies imposing a false idea or belief that causes ignorance, bewilderment, or helplessness. tried to deceive me about the cost mislead implies a leading astray that may or may not be intentional. I was misled by the confusing sign delude implies deceiving so thoroughly as to obscure the truth. we were deluded into thinking we were safe beguile stresses the use of charm and persuasion in deceiving. was beguiled by false promises

Examples of mislead in a Sentence

We believe that her comments were deliberately meant to mislead the public. We believe that her comments were deliberately meant to mislead.

Recent Examples on the Web

And that form is either confusing, or feels misleading, in the digital environment. Eric Johnson, Recode, "Why the New York Times won’t sell itself to a billionaire," 5 Nov. 2018 The Ohr testimony is also further evidence that the FBI misled the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court in its Page warrant application. Kimberley A. Strassel, WSJ, "What Bruce Ohr Told the FBI," 17 Jan. 2019 These include efforts to offer potential witnesses pardons, efforts to pressure Attorney General Jeff Sessions into reversing his recusal, Trump’s involvement in his son Don Jr.’s misleading public statement about his Trump Tower Russian meeting. Andrew Prokop, Vox, "Trump’s attorney general nominee wrote a memo expressing deep suspicion of the Mueller probe," 20 Dec. 2018 From faking diplomas to spreading questionable details about their family backgrounds, many politicians have been accused of misleading their constituents in recent months. Jennifer Earl, Fox News, "Politicians caught padding their resumes, from fake diplomas to biographical discrepancies," 21 Sep. 2018 The bill’s supporters argued that Cotton either misunderstood the bill or was misleading the public about it. German Lopez, Vox, "The Senate just passed criminal justice reform," 19 Dec. 2018 Lawrence Kudlow, director of the White House’s National Economic Council, also presented a rosy picture, though others who are tracking the talks say statements may be misleading. Vivian Salama, WSJ, "Trump Names Lighthizer to Run U.S.-China Negotiations," 3 Dec. 2018 But claims that the repeal plans would have eliminated coverage for all of them are misleading. Linda Qiu, The Seattle Times, "A Fact-Checker’s Guide to Thanksgiving Politics," 21 Nov. 2018 Schnader Harrison and Rosenfield on Monday said the claims in the federal court suit in Philadelphia were misleading and inaccurate. Bob Fernandez, Philly.com, "Philly law firm Schnader Harrison, lawyer sued in Middleton brother-sister feud over billions," 26 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'mislead.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of mislead

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

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Learn More about mislead

Dictionary Entries near mislead

misky

mislabel

mislay

mislead

mislear

misleared

mislearn

Statistics for mislead

Last Updated

12 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for mislead

The first known use of mislead was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for mislead

mislead

verb

English Language Learners Definition of mislead

: to cause (someone) to believe something that is not true

mislead

verb
mis·​lead | \ mis-ˈlēd \
misled\ -​ˈled \; misleading

Kids Definition of mislead

: to cause (someone) to believe something that is not true His comments were intended to mislead the public.

mislead

verb
mis·​lead | \ mis-ˈlēd \
misled\ -​ˈled \; misleading

Legal Definition of mislead

transitive verb

: to lead into a mistaken action or belief : to cause to have a false impression

intransitive verb

: to create a false impression — compare deceive

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More from Merriam-Webster on mislead

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for mislead

Spanish Central: Translation of mislead

Nglish: Translation of mislead for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of mislead for Arabic Speakers

Comments on mislead

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