mirror

noun
mir·​ror | \ ˈmir-ər How to pronounce mirror (audio) , ˈmi-rər\

Definition of mirror

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a polished or smooth surface (as of glass) that forms images by reflection She looked at herself in the mirror.
2a : something that gives a true representation the press as a mirror of public opinion— C. G. Bowers
b : an exemplary model She is the mirror of feminine beauty.

mirror

verb
mirrored; mirroring; mirrors

Definition of mirror (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to reflect in or as if in a mirror
2 : resemble

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Other Words from mirror

Noun

mirrored \ ˈmir-​ərd How to pronounce mirrored (audio) , ˈmi-​rərd , ˈmir-​əd , ˈmi-​rəd \ adjective
mirrorlike \ ˈmir-​ər-​ˌlīk How to pronounce mirrorlike (audio) , ˈmi-​rər-​ \ adjective

Synonyms for mirror

Synonyms: Noun

glass, looking glass

Synonyms: Verb

image, reflect

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Examples of mirror in a Sentence

Noun

breaking a mirror is supposed to bring seven years of bad luck

Verb

The building was mirrored in the lake. the still waters of the pond mirroring the cloudless sky above
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The mirror is a hanger, jewelry holder, and phone stand all in one. Tainaya Nash, House Beautiful, "This Space-Saving Mirror Is the One Thing Every College Student Should Own," 21 June 2019 That’s the alter ego of Issa Dee, who raps and responds to her conversation from her reflection in the mirror. Danielle Young, Essence, "What Does A Regina Hall Get-Over-Your-Ex Pep Talk Sound Like?," 17 June 2019 This makes particle beams immune to measures that can deflect lasers, like brightly polished, mirror-like surfaces. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "The Pentagon Wants to Test a Space-Based 'Particle Beam' by 2023," 18 Mar. 2019 Installed in Chicago's Millennium Park in 2006, the 110-ton sculpture shaped like a jellybean with a mirror-like finish quickly became an icon, a tourist magnet and popular backdrop for photos and selfies. Lisa Gutierrez, kansascity, "Artist behind Chicago's 'The Bean' asked NRA to stop using it in ad. Now he's suing," 22 June 2018 Mr McBride, for one, is not afraid to look in the mirror. The Economist, "Australia’s surprising disregard for free speech," 15 June 2019 Lee often splits the group in half so everyone has a chance to practice the dance with plenty of space and a view of themselves in the mirror. Sara Cagle, latimes.com, "Dance like you're in a BTS video? The K-pop workout that doesn't feel like work," 15 June 2019 Rosen’s piece consists of a room filled with fog, where viewers are invited to take a picture of themselves in a mirror. Washington Post, "The second annual By The People festival aims to be bigger, better and barge-ier," 12 June 2019 To prepare for such attacks, corporations should look in the mirror. Matthew F. Ferraro For Cnn Business Perspectives, CNN, "Disinformation is harming businesses. Here are 6 ways to fight it," 10 June 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Over the past four years, the top-tier Women’s Super League has grown to 12 clubs and moved to a fall-to-spring calendar that mirrors the English Premier League’s. Joshua Robinson, WSJ, "England Entertains Thoughts of World Cup Victory," 30 June 2019 Wisps of vapor rise from the land back to the sky to make new clouds and fresh showers, forming a cycle that mirrors that of Earth’s. Shannon Stirone, Scientific American, "New NASA Mission Will Fly Titan’s Frigid Skies to Search for Life’s Beginnings," 27 June 2019 Mobile County does have non-discrimination language it its employment policies that mirrors federal law. John Sharp, al.com, "In Alabama, protecting the LGBTQ community has become a ‘very local issue’," 27 June 2019 The new look includes a restored Pacific Electric train dining car, terrazzo tiles that mirror those on the Walk of Fame and Bugsy Siegel’s actual safe. Hadley Tomicki, latimes.com, "Jeremy Fox to open Birdie G's this week, Pizzana in WeHo and Leo's Tacos in the SFV," 18 June 2019 The last year has brought a rousing reversal of fortune that mirrors what's occurring across the state and nationally, as younger Hispanics are winning elections in partisan and nonpartisan races. Dallas News, "Hispanics get more political clout in Dallas, North Texas as new, younger leaders emerge," 17 June 2019 In a story that mirrors China’s metamorphosis into a global power, the company opened its first German office in Eschborn, near Frankfurt, back in 2001. Clifford Coonan, The Christian Science Monitor, "At stake in Huawei’s German bid, economic gain vs. national security," 6 June 2019 The dip largely mirrors both countries economic struggles with sluggish growth and high unemployment. Yomi Kazeem, Quartz Africa, "Nigeria and South Africa’s economic struggles are starting to hurt African phone sales," 13 June 2019 In obvious ways, the team mirrors its home region of the Bay Area, a place now flooded with tech overlords who seem invincible and wield immense powers, the true nature of which have yet to be revealed. Jason Parham, WIRED, "Depth of Field: The Glorious Scale of the NBA Finals' Game 5," 13 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'mirror.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of mirror

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1593, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for mirror

Noun

Middle English mirour "object with a reflective surface, reflection, model of conduct," borrowed from Anglo-French mirur, mireour, from mirer "to look at" (going back to Latin mīrārī "to be surprised, look with wonder at") + -ur, -eour -or entry 1 — more at admire

Verb

derivative of mirror entry 1

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Statistics for mirror

Last Updated

3 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for mirror

The first known use of mirror was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for mirror

mirror

noun

English Language Learners Definition of mirror

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a piece of glass that reflects images
: something that shows what another thing is like in a very clear and accurate way

mirror

verb

English Language Learners Definition of mirror (Entry 2 of 2)

: to be very similar to (something) : to show (something) in a very clear and accurate way
: to show the image of (something) on a surface

mirror

noun
mir·​ror | \ ˈmir-ər How to pronounce mirror (audio) \

Kids Definition of mirror

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a piece of glass that reflects images
2 : something that gives a true likeness or description The painting is a mirror of medieval life.

mirror

verb
mirrored; mirroring

Kids Definition of mirror (Entry 2 of 2)

: to reflect in or as if in a mirror “Why is the sea such a color?” he asked. “Sea mirrors sky,” his father replied.— Pearl S. Buck, The Big Wave

mirror

noun
mir·​ror | \ ˈmir-ər How to pronounce mirror (audio) \

Medical Definition of mirror

: a polished or smooth surface (as of glass) that forms images by reflection

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More from Merriam-Webster on mirror

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with mirror

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for mirror

Spanish Central: Translation of mirror

Nglish: Translation of mirror for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of mirror for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about mirror

Comments on mirror

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