mirror

noun
mir·​ror | \ ˈmir-ər , mi-rər\

Definition of mirror

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a polished or smooth surface (as of glass) that forms images by reflection She looked at herself in the mirror.
2a : something that gives a true representation the press as a mirror of public opinion— C. G. Bowers
b : an exemplary model She is the mirror of feminine beauty.

mirror

verb
mirrored; mirroring; mirrors

Definition of mirror (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to reflect in or as if in a mirror
2 : resemble

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Other Words from mirror

Noun

mirrored \ -​(r)ərd , -​(r)əd \ adjective
mirrorlike \ -​ˌlīk \ adjective

Synonyms for mirror

Synonyms: Noun

glass, looking glass

Synonyms: Verb

image, reflect

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Examples of mirror in a Sentence

Noun

breaking a mirror is supposed to bring seven years of bad luck

Verb

The building was mirrored in the lake. the still waters of the pond mirroring the cloudless sky above
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

In an extremely revealing photo posted this weekend, Shayk poses in the mirror for a selfie whilst wearing only a tiny Intimissimi lingerie set. Amy Mackelden, Harper's BAZAAR, "Irina Shayk Just Posted the Most Incredible Mirror Selfie & I Am Inspired," 3 Feb. 2019 But just imagine skaters doing triple axels on a silvery mirror gallium surface. Brian Resnick, Vox, "The surprising science of why ice is so slippery," 31 Jan. 2019 Though it had been quickly taken down, a mirror version made its way onto a YouTube account. Kate Storey, Town & Country, "Behind the PR Machine That Helped Change the Nick Sandmann Narrative," 25 Jan. 2019 In celebrity-friendly Aspen, slowing sales mirror the faltering luxury market in New York and Miami. WSJ, "Over 250,000 Votes Later, Hawaii Villa Emerges as the House of the Year," 24 Jan. 2019 The ice skater and his partner looked like hot mirror ball trophy contenders again on Monday evening's live show. Carole Glines, Fox News, "Adam Rippon hopes for a 'same sex' season of 'DWTS'," 2 Oct. 2018 Another woman from California found that her desk caught on fire, likely because of her mirror. Blake Bakkila, Good Housekeeping, "Martha Stewart Posts Terrifying Photos After Her Makeup Mirror Almost "Ignited" Her Bathroom," 7 Jan. 2019 Battery life: Newman never mentioned Qualcomm once, but Intel has to have Qualcomm and its power-sipping Snapdragon 8cx chip in its mirrors. Mark Hachman, PCWorld, "Inside Project Athena: How Intel and PC makers are creating the ultra-responsive laptops of tomorrow," 7 Jan. 2019 Google’s plan to clarify the source of ads placed on its network mirrors a similar initiative announced by Facebook last month, and is a step towards making online political advertising more transparent. Jon Porter, The Verge, "Google tightens political ad policies ahead of 2019 EU elections," 23 Nov. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

All of the kiddos walked the runway in one-of-a-kind outfits that mirrored those worn by the dolls in the collection. Abby Gardner, Glamour, "North West Just Made Her Runway Debut—and Kim Kardashian Was Front Row," 23 Sep. 2018 Each player and coach for the two teams were introduced individually in a manner that mirrored baseball’s Opening Day festivities. David Furones, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Douglas baseball team gets full-fledged MLB experience at Marlins Park," 5 Apr. 2018 But the Common Council — which earlier in the year barely enacted a weak open housing ordinance that mirrored a state law covering barely a third of Milwaukee's housing stock — wasn't exactly thrilled with it either. Chris Foran, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Open housing marches in Milwaukee reached 200 straight days — and kept on going — in 1968," 13 Mar. 2018 Some British lawmakers are also campaigning for legislation that mirrors the Magnitsky Act, a U.S. law passed in 2012 that froze assets of Russian investigators and prosecutors suspected of human rights abuses. Alexander Smith, NBC News, "How can U.K. respond to Russia-linked spy attack?," 13 Mar. 2018 The Styleform lawsuit goes through an expansive narrative that largely mirrors the one brought in the Six4Three complaint, in many instances using very similar if not identical language. Cyrus Farivar, Ars Technica, "Bikini app maker draws another disgruntled developer to its Facebook fight," 7 Dec. 2018 External displays work just like the old Lightning-to-HDMI adapter: the system will simply mirror the iPad Pro by default, but apps that support an extended screen can do different things. Nilay Patel, The Verge, "Apple iPad Pro review 2018: the fastest iPad is still an iPad," 5 Nov. 2018 A decade after Robertson made the pledge, Vancouver’s challenge largely mirrors Seattle’s. Vernal Coleman, The Seattle Times, "Vancouver, B.C., bet on modular housing to ease homelessness. Could it work in Seattle?," 1 Oct. 2018 Here are the views and concerns of the three stakeholders: WORRIED JAPAN Japan, a U.S. ally whose diplomatic policies largely mirror Washington's, is relying on Trump because Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has been unable to meet Kim. Mari Yamaguchi, chicagotribune.com, "North Korea's neighbors may have conflicting goals for Kim-Trump summit," 9 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'mirror.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of mirror

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1593, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for mirror

Noun

Middle English mirour "object with a reflective surface, reflection, model of conduct," borrowed from Anglo-French mirur, mireour, from mirer "to look at" (going back to Latin mīrārī "to be surprised, look with wonder at") + -ur, -eour -or entry 1 — more at admire

Verb

derivative of mirror entry 1

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Statistics for mirror

Last Updated

13 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for mirror

The first known use of mirror was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for mirror

mirror

noun

English Language Learners Definition of mirror

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a piece of glass that reflects images
: something that shows what another thing is like in a very clear and accurate way

mirror

verb

English Language Learners Definition of mirror (Entry 2 of 2)

: to be very similar to (something) : to show (something) in a very clear and accurate way
: to show the image of (something) on a surface

mirror

noun
mir·​ror | \ ˈmir-ər \

Kids Definition of mirror

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a piece of glass that reflects images
2 : something that gives a true likeness or description The painting is a mirror of medieval life.

mirror

verb
mirrored; mirroring

Kids Definition of mirror (Entry 2 of 2)

: to reflect in or as if in a mirror “Why is the sea such a color?” he asked. “Sea mirrors sky,” his father replied.— Pearl S. Buck, The Big Wave

mirror

noun
mir·​ror | \ ˈmir-ər \

Medical Definition of mirror

: a polished or smooth surface (as of glass) that forms images by reflection

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More from Merriam-Webster on mirror

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with mirror

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for mirror

Spanish Central: Translation of mirror

Nglish: Translation of mirror for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of mirror for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about mirror

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