mire

1 of 2

noun

1
: wet spongy earth (as of a bog or marsh)
the mire is relieved only by small stretches of open dry forestSaturday Review
2
: heavy often deep mud or slush
The troops trudged onward through the mire.
3
: a troublesome or intractable situation
found themselves in a mire of debt
miry adjective

mire

2 of 2

verb

mired; miring

transitive verb

1
a
: to cause to stick fast in or as if in mire
The car was mired in the muck.
b
: to hamper or hold back as if by mire : entangle
The company has been mired in legal problems.
2
: to cover or soil with mire
his mired boots

intransitive verb

: to stick or sink in mire
a road in which horses and wagons mired regularlyEdmund Arnold

Examples of mire in a Sentence

Noun The troops marched onward through the muck and the mire. played on a football field that was thick with mire Verb the sight of the standard, which had emerged from the battle mangled and mired, still stirred the soldiers' hearts the case has been mired in probate court for years
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Some were tasked with pulling electrical cords out of the mire while others attempted to tidy up the bedlam. Morena Duwe, Los Angeles Times, 10 Sep. 2023 Bloom’s methodical, risk-averse approach to roster-building as chief baseball officer represented a potential impediment to the Red Sox emerging from the mire of mediocrity. Alex Speier, BostonGlobe.com, 15 Sep. 2023 Most people who have been in the mire of heartbreak will have felt pain in their body somewhere. Eleanor Morgan, refinery29.com, 13 July 2023 Crumbled pistachios climb over the mire like neon green moss, making a bed for fuzzy sprouts of spearmint and peppermint, and ripe blueberries as fat and glossy as sapphires. Adam Erace, Travel + Leisure, 26 June 2023 The letter adds to the confusion around a mire of investigations and legal disputes that came to public attention this month when seven top lawyers in Paxton’s office accused him of bribery, abuse of office and other crimes. Lauren McGaughy, Dallas News, 12 Oct. 2020 Wheels and treads spin and spin, only digging military vehicles deeper into the mire. Michael Schwirtz, New York Times, 1 May 2023 The resulting mire of turbulent plasma and magnetic fields could help explain why the star is currently much brighter than the 400-day cycle would predict. Meghan Bartels, Scientific American, 15 May 2023 Crumbled pistachios climb over the mire like neon green moss, making a bed for fuzzy sprouts of spearmint and peppermint and ripe blueberries as fat and glossy as sapphires. Adam Erace, Travel + Leisure, 9 Nov. 2021
Verb
However the series has already been mired in controversy after contestants required medical assistance during the shoot, which took place in the U.K. during a surprise cold snap. K.j. Yossman, Variety, 22 Sep. 2023 But this progress could end up derailed if the policy conversation gets mired in conspiratorial claims. Caitlin McCulloch, Scientific American, 19 Sep. 2023 Puddles of oozing tar have been showing up over the last week, mucking up car tires and anything else that gets mired in the sticky black substance. Jeremy Childs, Los Angeles Times, 15 Sep. 2023 Even if relief officials wanted to accept foreign assistance, permission would require approval from the very top, and any such request could easily become mired in a bureaucratic chain of command, said Samia Errazzouki, an expert in Moroccan history and governance at Stanford University. Loveday Morris and Annabelle Timsit, Anchorage Daily News, 12 Sep. 2023 Democrats have slammed Republicans for what some see as a retaliatory attempt to get back at the party for its two impeachments of Donald Trump, who was acquitted of those charges by the Senate but is now mired in various federal and state investigations related to his time in office. Virginia Chamlee, Peoplemag, 12 Sep. 2023 Peloton has been mired in a two-year tailspin after being an early pandemic darling. Nick Turner, Fortune, 23 Aug. 2023 The assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, has inspired hundreds of books about a seminal event that, almost 60 years later, remains mired in a toxic quicksand of controversy and misinformation. Michael Granberry, Dallas News, 14 Sep. 2023 Mediterranean Sea The North African nation has been mired in violence between warring factions for more than a decade. Dan Stillman, Washington Post, 12 Sep. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'mire.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Old Norse mȳrr; akin to Old English mōs marsh — more at moss

First Known Use

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Time Traveler
The first known use of mire was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near mire

Cite this Entry

“Mire.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mire. Accessed 2 Oct. 2023.

Kids Definition

mire

1 of 2 noun
1
: wet spongy ground (as of a bog or marsh)
2
: heavy often deep mud or slush
miry adjective

mire

2 of 2 verb
mired; miring
1
a
: to sink or stick fast in mire
2
: to soil with mud or slush

Medical Definition

mire

noun
: any of the objects on the arm of an ophthalmometer that are used to measure astigmatism by the reflections they produce in the cornea when illuminated

More from Merriam-Webster on mire

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