masquerade

noun
mas·​quer·​ade | \ ˌma-skə-ˈrād How to pronounce masquerade (audio) \

Definition of masquerade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a social gathering of persons wearing masks and often fantastic costumes
b : a costume for wear at such a gathering
2 : an action or appearance that is mere disguise or show

masquerade

verb
masqueraded; masquerading

Definition of masquerade (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a : to disguise oneself also : to go about disguised
b : to take part in a masquerade
2 : to assume the appearance of something one is not

Other Words from masquerade

Verb

masquerader noun

Examples of masquerade in a Sentence

Noun She could not keep up the masquerade any longer. although she was deeply bored, she maintained a masquerade of polite interest as her guest droned on Verb He was masquerading under a false name.
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Anti-fatness is often a more socially acceptable masquerade for anti-Blackness. Ashley Andreou, Scientific American, 26 May 2022 One through line is the carnival tradition, which recurs, chameleon-like, in everything from a eighteenth-century landscape of Dutch Suriname to a crowded village masquerade painted by the mid-century Haïtian artist Sénèque Obin. Julian Lucas, The New Yorker, 4 May 2022 Wally Westmore’s makeups and Nellie Manley’s hair supervision are all important in making the spectator accept the masquerade and, at the proper moments, in keeping the audience guessing. Jack Moffitt, The Hollywood Reporter, 13 May 2022 The masquerade will benefit the Center’s youth programs, including the Sunburst Youth Housing Project. San Diego Union-Tribune, 20 Apr. 2022 His masquerade also reveals unexpected lines of kinship. Julian Lucas, The New Yorker, 21 Feb. 2022 Wynne, who has done legitimate business in the Eastern Bloc, trading in scientific machinery, is persuaded to fly to Moscow, to establish an overt professional link with Penkovsky and, under that masquerade, to bring back sensitive information. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker, 15 Mar. 2021 Sophie Beckett, the daughter of an earl who is disdainfully treated as a servant by her stepmother, sneaks out to Lady Bridgerton's famed masquerade ball. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, 25 Mar. 2022 And the part of that campaign that the intelligence community missed was Russia's use of social media masquerade accounts masquerading as Americans to sow divisions. CBS News, 2 Feb. 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Today, many vendors claim zero-trust capabilities that, in reality, masquerade as a subliminal product ad and turn zero trust into product-centric babble. Benny Lakunishok, Forbes, 25 July 2022 In fact, sometimes, cyclical challenges can masquerade or transform into long term ones. Harry G. Broadman, Forbes, 1 July 2022 Branding covers over those questions, so arbitrary choice can masquerade as preference. Ian Bogost, The Atlantic, 30 Apr. 2022 This chewy beauty is as light as a Pinot Noir, and could even masquerade as a Grenache. Tom Mullen, Forbes, 22 May 2022 Gujarat state has a long history of immigration to the United States, a trend that has only intensified during the pandemic, creating brisk demand for smuggling enterprises that masquerade as travel agencies. New York Times, 14 Mar. 2022 Barrel transfers in the dead of night from one vessel to another allowed Iran to masquerade under different flags, selling its oil to keen Asian buyers without catching the eye of Western monitors. Nadeen Ebrahim, CNN, 15 Apr. 2022 What is camp, however, is the production’s decision to put an Oscar winner in 200 pounds of prosthetics to masquerade as a midwestern murdering mom. Michael Appler, Variety, 11 Mar. 2022 Prize will be a private, invitation-only distillers masquerade ball at Aviator Event Center and Pub on Saturday, Nov. 19, with music, food and drinks. Marc Bona, cleveland, 7 Mar. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'masquerade.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of masquerade

Noun

1587, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1677, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for masquerade

Noun

Middle French, from Old Italian dialect mascarada, from Old Italian maschera mask

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Time Traveler for masquerade

Time Traveler

The first known use of masquerade was in 1587

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Dictionary Entries Near masquerade

masquer

masquerade

mass

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Statistics for masquerade

Last Updated

30 Jun 2022

Cite this Entry

“Masquerade.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/masquerade. Accessed 12 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for masquerade

masquerade

noun
mas·​quer·​ade | \ ˌma-skə-ˈrād How to pronounce masquerade (audio) \

Kids Definition of masquerade

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a party (as a dance) at which people wear masks and costumes
2 : the act of pretending to be something different His friendliness was just a masquerade.

masquerade

verb
masqueraded; masquerading

Kids Definition of masquerade (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to wear a disguise
2 : to pretend to be something different : pose He was masquerading as a policeman.

Other Words from masquerade

masquerader noun

More from Merriam-Webster on masquerade

Nglish: Translation of masquerade for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of masquerade for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about masquerade

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