mandate

noun
man·​date | \ ˈman-ˌdāt How to pronounce mandate (audio) \

Definition of mandate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an authoritative command especially : a formal order from a superior court or official to an inferior one
2 : an authorization to act given to a representative accepted the mandate of the people
3a : an order or commission granted by the League of Nations to a member nation for the establishment of a responsible government over a former German colony or other conquered territory
b : a mandated territory

mandate

verb
man·​date | \ ˈman-ˌdāt How to pronounce mandate (audio) \
mandated; mandating

Definition of mandate (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to administer or assign (something, such as a territory) under a mandate
2 : to officially require (something) : make (something) mandatory : order a law mandating recycling also : to direct or require (someone) to do something a commission mandated to investigate corruption

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When Should You Use mandate?

A mandate from a leader is a command you can't refuse. But that kind of personal command is rarely the meaning of mandate today; much more common are connected with institutions. Thus, the Clean Air Act was a mandate from Congress to clean up air pollution—and since mandate is also a verb, we could say instead that the Clear Air Act mandated new restrictions on air pollution. Elections are often interpreted as mandates from the public for certain kinds of action. But since a politician is not just a symbol of certain policies but also an individual who might happen to have an awfully nice smile, it can be risky to interpret most elections as mandating anything at all.

Examples of mandate in a Sentence

Noun Sports fans have considerable forbearance. Year after year they endure escalating ticket prices, the abomination known as seat licensing and the implied mandate that taxpayers should foot the bill for the new stadium or arena that will absolutely revive downtown. — Jack McCallum, Sports Illustrated, 30 July 2007 All provisions requiring congressional approval, such as FDA regulation, were dropped, as were mandates for stronger package warnings, tighter enforcement on sales to youth, stronger public smoking bans, and … provisions to reduce youth smoking. — Allan M. Brandt, The Cigarette Century, 2007 Not the least of the Governors' problems are the new mandates being put on them by Washington—by a President who was once one of their own. — Karen Tumulty, Time, 19 May 2003 Royal mandates must be obeyed. They carried out the governor's mandate to build more roads. He won the election so convincingly that he believed he had been given a mandate for change. Verb The carbon prices on the European exchanges are higher precisely because the allowances for carbon emissions are mandated by government. — Al Gore, An Inconvenient Truth, 2006 But the FDA did nothing. Later, it protested that it doesn't have the authority to mandate additional studies once a drug is marketed, but that is sophistry. The FDA has the authority to pull drugs off the market … — Marcia Angell, New York Review of Books, 8 June 2006 For a few tantalizing weeks this spring, the manufacturers of gun safety locks seemed to have hit the jackpot: the gun-control bill passed by the Senate in the wake of the Littleton shootings mandated that all new handguns be equipped with safety locks. — Calvin Trillin, Time, 5 July 1999 The law mandates that every car have seat belts. He won the election so convincingly that he believed the people had mandated him to carry out his policies.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun But businesses with more than 500 employees are excluded from the mandate, and firms with fewer than 50 can ask for an exemption. Abby Vesoulis, Time, "How COVID-19 Has Created a Childcare Catch-22 for Working Families," 13 May 2020 The case focuses on the ACA's individual mandate after a lower court used it to find the entire law to be unconstitutional. Caitlin Conant, CBS News, "2020 Daily Trail Markers: 20 million more now eligible for Obamacare coverage," 13 May 2020 With inconsistent guidance from political leaders and conflicting social-distancing mandates among states, Americans are navigating how and when to police one another’s behavior. Kaitlyn Tiffany, The Atlantic, "How ‘Karen’ Became a Coronavirus Villain," 6 May 2020 In early April, Airbnb released a statement regarding a community policy update in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, banning hosts from authorizing parties in regions where current public health mandates prohibit events and gatherings. Madeline Mitchell, Cincinnati.com, "'We want to be very clear.' Airbnb will ban Cincinnati guests who attempt to throw parties," 5 May 2020 The new social customs and mandates in Beijing, Hong Kong, and Seoul, as well as Sydney and Taiwan’s capital, Taipei, offer a preview of what might soon be common globally. Su-hyun Lee, BostonGlobe.com, "Across the globe, cities slowly emerging from quarantine face ‘new normal’," 2 May 2020 With comedy clubs from California to New York dark due to social-distancing mandates, comedians are finding ways to keep bringing the laughs to the public. Washington Post, "Comics keep laughs coming even with clubs closed by COVID-19," 27 Apr. 2020 Even before any statewide mandates, many beauty businesses voluntarily closed their doors until further notice to protect their clients and staff. Janell Hickman, Allure, "How to Shave Your Head Into a Cool Buzz Cut at Home," 21 Apr. 2020 These restrictions include social-distancing mandates. Andrew C. Mccarthy, National Review, "The Justice Department Achieves a Victory for Religious Liberty," 16 Apr. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Governors in nearly all 50 states have issued stay-at-home orders and mandated nonessential businesses to close as part of efforts to slow the spread of the coronavirus. CBS News, "Watch live: White House Coronavirus Task Force members give update on COVID-19 response," 23 Apr. 2020 And no other states have mandated the closure of chiropractic offices. Dahlia Ghabour, The Courier-Journal, "These Kentucky businesses have suffered in the pandemic, but they're fighting to survive," 20 Apr. 2020 On March 16, the government mandated strict restrictions across the country. Fox News, "Coronavirus lockdown: Which European countries are easing restrictions?," 20 Apr. 2020 Passed in 2013, the NFSA mandates that the central government supply 5kg of foodgrains at subsidised prices to 75% of the population in rural areas and 50% of the population in urban areas. Scroll Staff, Quartz India, "India may be forgetting over 100 million people in its coronavirus relief measures," 16 Apr. 2020 Face masks, once thought of as an unnecessary precaution for healthy people during the pandemic, are now being mandated in cities and counties across the United States. Rebecca Tan, Washington Post, "The CDC recommends masks. In some cities and counties, they’ll be mandatory.," 9 Apr. 2020 As part of a financial stimulus bill, federal transportation officials have mandated that airlines maintain a minimum amount of baseline flights across the country in exchange for monetary aid. Jessica Puckett, Condé Nast Traveler, "Coronavirus in New York: Airlines Are Slashing Flights to NYC as Outbreak Peak Looms," 6 Apr. 2020 Then, in late January, the federal government mandated the cancelation of all flights to and from China. Ian Johnson, The New York Review of Books, "Pandemic Journal, March 30–April 5," 5 Apr. 2020 The federal rules further mandate that a quarantine be the least restrictive possible measure to enforce the government’s goals. Jeremy B. Merrill, Quartz, "Donald Trump considered quarantining New York. Can he do that?," 28 Mar. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'mandate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of mandate

Noun

1501, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1919, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for mandate

Noun and Verb

Middle French & Latin; Middle French mandat, from Latin mandatum, from neuter of mandatus, past participle of mandare to entrust, enjoin, probably irregular from manus hand + -dere to put — more at manual, do

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Time Traveler for mandate

Time Traveler

The first known use of mandate was in 1501

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Statistics for mandate

Last Updated

17 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Mandate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mandate. Accessed 30 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for mandate

mandate

noun
How to pronounce mandate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of mandate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal
: an official order to do something
: the power to act that voters give to their elected leaders

mandate

verb
How to pronounce mandate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of mandate (Entry 2 of 2)

chiefly US, formal
: to officially demand or require (something)
: to officially give (someone) the power to do something

mandate

noun
man·​date | \ ˈman-ˌdāt How to pronounce mandate (audio) \

Kids Definition of mandate

1 : an order from a higher court to a lower court
2 : a command or instruction from an authority
3 : the instruction given by voters to their elected representatives

mandate

noun
man·​date | \ ˈman-ˌdāt How to pronounce mandate (audio) \

Legal Definition of mandate

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a formal communication from a reviewing court notifying the court below of its judgment and directing the lower court to act accordingly
2 in the civil law of Louisiana : an act by which a person gives another person the power to transact for him or her one or several affairs
3a : an authoritative command : a clear authorization or direction the mandate of the full faith and credit clauseNational Law Journal
b : the authorization to act given by a constituency to its elected representative
mandated; mandating

Legal Definition of mandate (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make mandatory or required the Pennsylvania Constitution mandates a criminal defendant's right to confrontationNational Law Journal

History and Etymology for mandate

Noun

Latin mandatum, from neuter of mandatus, past participle of mandare to entrust, enjoin, probably irregularly from manus hand + -dere to put

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Comments on mandate

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